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I am fighting this very strange issue and I hope somebody can explain the reason to me.

I have this piece of code to transfer data from file over Socket connection.

    byte[] chunk = new byte[Constants.TRANSFER_CHUNK_SIZE];
    try (InputStream fileInputStream = new FileInputStream(sourceFile); BufferedInputStream buffFileInputStream = new BufferedInputStream(fileInputStream)) {
        while (offset < sourceFileSize) {
            int numBytes = buffFileInputStream.read(chunk, 0, Constants.TRANSFER_CHUNK_SIZE);
            Message chunkMessage = new Message(MessageType.SPM_TRANSFER_CHUNK, numBytes, null, chunk);
            this.sendMessage(chunkMessage);
        }
    }

Method sendMessage doesn't do anything special, just send object over ObjectOutputStream:

private void sendMessage(Message message) {
    try {
       this.conOutputStream.writeObject(message);
       this.conOutputStream.flush();
    } catch (IOException ex) {
            ......
    }
}

The Message class itself looks like:

public class Message implements Serializable {

protected final MessageType type;
protected final int intValue;
protected final String stringValue;
protected byte[] data;
protected final long longValue;

public Message(MessageType type, int intValue, long longValue, String stringValue, byte[] data) {
    this.type = type;
    this.intValue = intValue;
    this.stringValue = stringValue;
    this.data = data;
    this.longValue = longValue;
}

................

}

When I print out the chunk array on the transmitter side the data is ok, but on the receiver side I always receive data from the first chunk, like (only first three bytes are printed):

RC: 73 68 51
RC: 73 68 51
RC: 73 68 51
RC: 73 68 51
.......

What I already know:

  • Problem isn't in transit.
  • Creating a new array in every loop of that while cycle is solving this issue (but is memory inefficient, that's why I changed it.)

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
You're always reading from byte 0 (the second passed in value)? Shouldn't you increment the offset once you've read a chunk? –  Evan Knowles Mar 28 '13 at 13:26
    
This is perplexing. A couple of issues: 1) Why isn't data a final member? 2) You should really make a defensive copy of the array in the constructor. As you pointed out, that fixes your problem, but I'm still not sure why. It looks like you've excerpted your code, so I wonder if something's missing. –  Charles Forsythe Mar 28 '13 at 13:31
    
It has been final, until I started experimenting. It will be final. And yes I excerpted my code, but I don't think anything important is missing, this is the part where the problem happens. –  castor Mar 28 '13 at 13:34

2 Answers 2

public SyncPlaneMessage(MessageType type, int intValue, long longValue, String stringValue, byte[] data) {
    // ...
    this.data = data;
    // ...
}

You're saving a reference to the array that gets passed in. If that array changes after the constructor call then so will this.data. This is why creating a copy of the array fixes the problem.

Copying the arrays does use more memory, but what choice do you have? The right place to make the copy is in the constructor, at least, and not in the while loop.

this.data = Arrays.copyOf(data, data.length);
share|improve this answer
    
Yes that solves a problem. But I want to know whether I have an other option. I have done this with 2 streams (just transferring data from file to HTTP client) and it worked well. If there is an option how to solve this. I would like to do it. –  castor Mar 28 '13 at 13:32
    
The constructor should definitely make a defensive copy of the array, but it's still a mystery why the deserialized objects have only the initial bytes. You'd think the problem would be that bytes from later objects would appear because of the post-constructor data change. It seems like there's a lesson in object serialization in here somewhere... –  Charles Forsythe Mar 28 '13 at 13:36
    
Yes I am wondering why this is happening. And there is no post-constructor data change. There is nothing happening with that array until it's sent. It's just LoadData -> CreateMessage -> TransferMessageObject. Nothing in between to modify that chunk. And anyway, why the initial data? –  castor Mar 28 '13 at 13:38
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Finally found solution to this problem. This issue is caused by Serialisation Cache. ObjectOutputStream does not send the same object (even if changed), if it did so previously to the same stream.

Resetting the ObjectOutputStream before sending every message solved my problem,probably with some performance loss, but problem is solved. Now the ObjectOutputStream always sends fresh data.

So in my case I modified method sendMessage(), so it now resets ObjectOutputStream before sending the message object.

private void sendMessage(Message message) {
    try {
       this.conOutputStream.reset();
       this.conOutputStream.writeObject(message);
       this.conOutputStream.flush();
    } catch (IOException ex) {
            ......
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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