Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I need to delete an application (MyApp.app), which has read only permissions in all its enclosed folders. Before I delete it, I should change the permissions on all enclosed files/directories to 0644. How do I do this recursively?

I've tried

begin; FileUtils.chmod(0644, '#{config.appPath}'); rescue; end
begin; FileUtils.rm_r('#{config.appPath}'); rescue; end

but FileUtils.chmod doesn't work recursively. I cannot use Unix commands - it has to be Ruby.

EDIT: I cannot use Unix commands in the current context. OK, this is a RubyCocoa application and the source you see is a part of ruby script, that is supposed to uninstall the application (please don't comment on that, since that's the code my customer has). Uninstalling includes removing all traces of the application, killing the process and in the end deleting the application itself. Normally it works, but not in the case when for some reason the MyApp.app folder gets read only permission. So i thought to run a chmod recursively on the folder and them remove it, but it's not straight forward in Ruby for some reason. That's why i'm asking for a help. There are plenty examples on how to do it from a command line, but how do you do it from the code?

Here some more from the code, just to show how's it implemented:

code =<<FOO
require 'fileutils'
# kill the app before deleting files in case it writes files on exit
%x{/bin/kill -9 #{NSProcessInfo.processInfo.processIdentifier}}
begin; FileUtils.chmod(0644, '#{TBConfig.appPath}'); rescue; end
begin; FileUtils.rm_r('#{TBConfig.appPath}'); rescue; end
FOO
    ff = Tempfile.new('timebridge')
    ff.write(code)
    ff.close
    %x{/usr/bin/ruby #{ff.path}}

Thanks again.

share|improve this question
2  
If you're just deleting it anyway, of what use is it to change the permissions? –  Jeff Kelley Oct 14 '09 at 19:04
    
When you say you cannot use Unix commands, I get confused. You're on OSX. Unix commands work perfectly well there. Is this homework? (Beyond that, Jeff is right: there's no reason to change the permissions on something you're about to delete.) –  Telemachus Oct 14 '09 at 19:09
    
If the MyApp.app has read-only permission on all enclosed folders I can't delete it. Please see the EDIT for better explanation. No it's not a homework... –  Nava Carmon Oct 14 '09 at 21:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

FileUtils.chmod_R should do it

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core/classes/FileUtils.html#M004351

-- EDIT --

seth@oxygen ~ $ mkdir -p foo/bar/seth

seth@oxygen ~ $ ls -ld foo
drwxr-xr-x  3 seth  staff  102 Oct 15 19:24 foo

seth@oxygen ~ $ ls -ld foo/bar
drwxr-xr-x  3 seth  staff  102 Oct 15 19:24 foo/bar

seth@oxygen ~ $ ls -ld foo/bar/seth
drwxr-xr-x  2 seth  staff  68 Oct 15 19:24 foo/bar/seth

seth@oxygen ~ $ cat test.rb
require 'fileutils'
begin; FileUtils.chmod_R(0777, 'foo'); rescue; end

seth@oxygen ~ $ ruby test.rb

seth@oxygen ~ $ ls -ld foo
drwxrwxrwx  3 seth  staff  102 Oct 15 19:24 foo

seth@oxygen ~ $ ls -ld foo/bar
drwxrwxrwx  3 seth  staff  102 Oct 15 19:24 foo/bar

seth@oxygen ~ $ ls -ld foo/bar/seth
drwxrwxrwx  2 seth  staff  68 Oct 15 19:24 foo/bar/seth

A quick test appears to work.

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't do it recursively for some reason. –  Nava Carmon Oct 14 '09 at 20:43
    
I'll be sure to make the same test on my side. Will let you know. Thanks –  Nava Carmon Oct 16 '09 at 4:53
    
@Seth, thank you very much, it worked! For some reason when i tried it it didn't, but probably i didn't use it right. –  Nava Carmon Oct 16 '09 at 8:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.