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I was writing this code in C when I encountered the following problem.

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
   int i=2;
   int j=3;
   int k,l;
   float a,b;
   k=i/j*j;
   l=j/i*i;
   a=i/j*j;
   b=j/i*i;
   printf("%d %d %f %f\n",k,l,a,b);
   return 0;
}

Can anyone tell me why the code is returning zero for the first and third variables (k and a)?

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5  
What errors are you getting? What do you expect the output to be? What output are you getting? –  Thomas Owens Oct 14 '09 at 19:08
1  
note that you've got /n instead of \n. Is this a copy-paste of your code, or have you re-typed it? Better to have a copy-paste to avoid transcription errors. –  therefromhere Oct 14 '09 at 19:10
1  
I've altered the title/question to what I think was intended –  therefromhere Oct 14 '09 at 19:16
    
@therefromhere: you're just guessing and "fixing" the question doesn't help the asker learn how to ask better questions. –  Greg Hewgill Oct 14 '09 at 19:20
2  
(I accept that this is pretty extreme edit, but it's such a common beginner's error I thought it was worth a stab) –  therefromhere Oct 14 '09 at 19:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What I think you are experiencing is integer arithmetic. You correctly suppose l and b to be 2, but incorrectly assume that k and a will be 3 because it's the same operation. But it's not, it's integer arithmetic (rather than floating-point arithmetic). So when you do i / j (please consider using some whitespace), 2 / 3 = 0.33333... which is cast to an int and thus becomes 0. Then we multiply by 3 again, and 0 * 3 = 0.

If you change i and j to be floats (or pepper your math with (float) casts), this will do what you expect.

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Are you asking why k and a show up as zero? This is because in integer division 2/3 = 0 (the fractional part is truncated).

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Expanding on that, when you write "a = <expr>;" with "a" declared float, it is only the result of <expr> that is casted to float. Since all the values and variables in your expressions are integer, the results are all based on integer arithmetic. –  Steve314 Oct 14 '09 at 19:23
    
This goes for a as well, because he's doing the same operation there (i/j == (int)2/(int)3 == 0) –  T.E.D. Oct 14 '09 at 19:59

You haven't said what you're getting or what you expect, but in this case it's probably easy to guess. When you do 'a=i/j*j', you're expecting the result to be roughly .2222 (i.e. 2/9), but instead you're getting 0.0. This is because i and j are both int's, so the multiplication and (crucially) division are done in integer math, yielding 0. You assign the result to a float, so that 0 is then converted to 0.0f.

To fix it, convert at least one operand to floating point BEFORE the division: a = (float)i/j*j);

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this is due to how the c compiler treats int in divisions:

 #include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
int i=2;
int j=3;
int k,l;
float a,b;
k=i/j*j; // k = (2/3)*3=0*3=0
l=j/i*i; // l = (3/2)*2=1*2=2
a=i/j*j; // same as k
b=j/i*i; // same as b
printf("%d %d %f %f/n",k,l,a,b);
return 0;
}
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If you're asking why k and a are 0: i/j*j is the same as (i/j)*j. Since j is larger than i, i/j is 0 (integer division). 0*j is still 0, so the result (k) is 0. The same applies to the value of a.

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