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C# does not provide a native implementation of a priority queue.

On Stackoverflow, a common answer to this kind of problem is to use the Power Collections.

Should I go ahead with that, or are there any downsides?

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1 Answer

The Power Collections indeed provide some excellent implementations of commonly used data structures that are not (yet) present in the .NET framework. While going with that option would not be terrible, I would like to point out an important flaw with this approach.

The OrderedMultiDictionary (as well as all other Power Collection classes) uses a red-black tree to create an ordered bag of key-value pairs. For an priority queue, RB trees tend to be an inferior data structure. I'm making the assumption that the priority value is hashable into an integer.

The reason is simple - a Dictionary can jump to a specific priority value right away in O(1), where is can use a specialized data structure to store the values of that priority (i.e. a queue).

Test

To check my claims, I wrote a simple benchmark that compares priority queue structures based on 3 different ideas:

  1. Power Collections OrderedMultiDictionary
  2. SortedDictionary
  3. Dictionary

The second option uses a SortedDictionary, which internally is implemented as a BST. The third option uses a simple Dictionary with O(1) lookup.

I tested with a varying number of elements, shown in the Y-axis, and a varying number of distinct values, shown as the X-axis. The results for a particular combination is shown as a 3x3 matrix of values. The first line refers to option 1 (OrdererdMultiDictionary, the second to the SortedDictionary and the third to the Dictionary. The first value in each of these 3 lines shows the time taken to enqueue the respective number of values, the second the time taken to enumerate over all values, the third the time to dequeue all values again.

All times are log 2. A value of 10 indicates 2^10ms = 1s, though the absolute value is of low importance. The number of elements is doubled, which means that, if the structure behaves O(n)-like, time should increase by 1 each time.

Horizontally, the number of distinct values is multiplied by 32 per column. Thus, the first column (with just the same value being inserted over and over) shows the performance of the internal data structure holding the values.

The machine used is an i7 with 16 GB plus SSD.

          |           1        |          32        |        1024        |       32768        |     1048576        |

       128
          | -4.9 / -4.3 /  n/a | -4.7 / -4.1 /  n/a | -4.8 / -2.9 /  n/a | -4.9 / -2.9 /  n/a | -4.9 / -2.9 /  n/a |
          | -7.5 / -6.1 / -5.3 | -6.5 / -5.7 / -5.1 | -4.7 / -4.9 / -4.3 | -4.6 / -4.7 / -4.2 | -4.6 / -4.8 / -4.2 |
          | -7.5 / -7.6 / -6.6 | -6.8 / -7.3 / -6.3 | -5.9 / -5.9 / -3.0 | -6.2 / -6.4 / -2.8 | -6.2 / -6.3 / -2.8 |


       256
          | -3.8 / -3.2 /  n/a | -3.7 / -3.1 /  n/a | -3.7 / -2.2 /  n/a | -3.8 / -1.8 /  n/a | -3.7 / -1.8 /  n/a |
          | -6.8 / -5.5 / -4.4 | -5.8 / -5.4 / -4.2 | -3.8 / -4.3 / -3.4 | -3.5 / -4.1 / -3.2 | -3.5 / -4.1 / -3.1 |
          | -6.6 / -6.9 / -5.7 | -6.1 / -6.7 / -5.7 | -5.5 / -5.3 / -1.8 | -5.3 / -5.0 / -0.9 | -5.3 / -5.6 / -1.0 |


       512
          | -2.7 / -2.1 /  n/a | -2.5 / -2.1 /  n/a | -2.5 / -1.5 /  n/a | -2.6 / -0.7 /  n/a | -2.6 / -0.7 /  n/a |
          | -5.9 / -5.2 / -3.4 | -4.9 / -5.0 / -3.3 | -3.2 / -4.2 / -2.6 | -2.4 / -3.2 / -2.1 | -2.3 / -3.2 / -2.0 |
          | -5.7 / -6.1 / -4.9 | -5.2 / -6.1 / -4.8 | -4.8 / -5.0 / -1.7 | -4.3 / -4.0 /  1.0 | -4.4 / -4.7 /  1.0 |


      1024
          | -1.6 / -1.0 /  n/a | -1.4 / -1.0 /  n/a | -1.4 / -0.7 /  n/a | -1.5 /  0.4 /  n/a | -1.5 /  0.3 /  n/a |
          | -4.9 / -4.7 / -2.4 | -4.1 / -4.5 / -2.3 | -2.6 / -4.0 / -1.8 | -1.2 / -2.3 / -1.0 | -1.2 / -2.3 / -0.9 |
          | -4.7 / -5.4 / -3.9 | -4.4 / -5.3 / -3.8 | -4.1 / -4.6 / -1.6 | -3.3 / -3.0 /  2.9 | -3.5 / -3.8 /  3.0 |


      2048
          | -0.4 /  0.1 /  n/a | -0.3 /  0.1 /  n/a | -0.3 /  0.3 /  n/a | -0.3 /  1.5 /  n/a | -0.5 /  1.4 /  n/a |
          | -4.0 / -4.1 / -1.4 | -3.2 / -4.0 / -1.3 | -1.7 / -3.5 / -0.9 | -0.2 / -1.4 /  0.1 | -0.2 / -1.3 /  0.1 |
          | -3.8 / -4.5 / -2.9 | -3.5 / -4.4 / -2.9 | -3.2 / -3.9 / -1.0 | -2.5 / -2.0 /  4.9 | -2.4 / -2.1 /  4.9 |


      4096
          |  0.7 /  1.2 /  n/a |  0.8 /  1.2 /  n/a |  0.9 /  1.3 /  n/a |  0.8 /  2.8 /  n/a |  0.6 /  2.9 /  n/a |
          | -3.0 / -3.2 / -0.4 | -2.2 / -3.3 / -0.3 | -0.8 / -3.0 /  0.1 |  0.9 / -0.4 /  1.1 |  0.9 / -0.2 /  1.2 |
          | -2.9 / -3.5 / -1.9 | -2.6 / -3.5 / -1.9 | -2.3 / -3.2 / -0.9 | -1.6 / -1.1 /  6.6 | -1.3 / -1.1 /  6.9 |


      8192
          |  1.8 /  2.8 /  n/a |  1.9 /  3.0 /  n/a |  2.0 /  3.0 /  n/a |  1.9 /  4.0 /  n/a |  1.8 /  4.1 /  n/a |
          | -2.0 / -2.4 /  0.6 | -1.3 / -2.4 /  0.7 |  0.1 / -2.2 /  1.1 |  1.8 /  0.4 /  2.1 |  2.1 /  0.9 /  2.3 |
          | -1.9 / -2.6 / -1.0 | -1.6 / -2.5 / -0.9 | -1.4 / -2.4 / -0.3 | -0.6 / -0.3 /  8.0 | -0.5 /  0.1 /  8.9 |


     16384
          |  2.9 /  3.7 /  n/a |  3.0 /  3.6 /  n/a |  3.1 /  3.8 /  n/a |  3.1 /  4.6 /  n/a |  3.0 /  5.2 /  n/a |
          | -1.0 / -1.5 /  1.6 | -0.3 / -1.5 /  1.7 |  1.1 / -1.4 /  2.0 |  2.4 /  0.7 /  2.9 |  3.2 /  1.9 /  3.6 |
          | -0.9 / -1.6 /  0.0 | -0.6 / -1.6 /  0.1 | -0.5 / -1.5 /  0.4 |  0.0 / -0.1 /  8.0 |  0.6 /  1.2 / 10.9 |


     32768
          |  4.0 /  5.0 /  n/a |  4.1 /  5.0 /  n/a |  4.3 /  5.0 /  n/a |  4.2 /  5.5 /  n/a |  4.1 /  6.4 /  n/a |
          | -0.1 / -0.5 /  2.6 |  0.7 / -0.5 /  2.7 |  2.0 / -0.5 /  3.1 |  3.1 /  0.9 /  3.8 |  4.3 /  3.0 /  4.8 |
          |  0.1 / -0.6 /  1.0 |  0.4 / -0.6 /  1.1 |  0.5 / -0.5 /  1.3 |  0.9 /  0.4 /  8.0 |  1.6 /  2.3 / 12.9 |


     65536
          |  5.2 /  6.6 /  n/a |  5.4 /  6.4 /  n/a |  5.5 /  6.4 /  n/a |  5.5 /  6.8 /  n/a |  5.4 /  7.4 /  n/a |
          |  1.0 /  0.4 /  3.6 |  1.8 /  0.5 /  3.7 |  3.0 /  0.4 /  4.1 |  4.2 /  1.9 /  4.9 |  5.5 /  4.2 /  6.0 |
          |  1.1 /  0.4 /  2.0 |  1.4 /  0.4 /  2.1 |  1.5 /  0.5 /  2.4 |  2.0 /  1.4 /  9.8 |  3.2 /  3.4 / 14.8 |


    131072
          |  6.5 /  7.8 /  n/a |  6.6 /  7.6 /  n/a |  6.8 /  7.4 /  n/a |  6.9 /  7.7 /  n/a |  6.8 /  8.6 /  n/a |
          |  2.0 /  1.4 /  4.6 |  2.9 /  1.4 /  4.8 |  4.1 /  1.5 /  5.2 |  5.2 /  2.4 /  5.8 |  6.8 /  5.4 /  7.0 |
          |  2.1 /  1.4 /  3.1 |  2.4 /  1.4 /  3.1 |  2.5 /  1.5 /  3.3 |  3.0 /  2.0 /  9.9 |  4.4 /  4.6 / 16.6 |


    262144
          |  7.5 /  8.9 /  n/a |  7.6 /  8.9 /  n/a |  7.8 /  8.6 /  n/a |  8.0 /  8.8 /  n/a |  8.2 /  9.6 /  n/a |
          |  3.0 /  2.4 /  5.6 |  3.9 /  2.4 /  5.7 |  5.1 /  2.4 /  6.1 |  6.1 /  2.9 /  6.7 |  8.1 /  6.4 /  8.1 |
          |  3.1 /  2.5 /  4.1 |  3.3 /  2.4 /  4.1 |  3.5 /  2.4 /  4.2 |  4.7 /  3.6 /  9.9 |  5.7 /  5.8 / 18.2 |


    524288
          |  8.6 / 10.0 /  n/a |  8.8 / 10.0 /  n/a |  9.0 /  9.6 /  n/a |  9.4 /  9.7 /  n/a |  9.3 / 10.4 /  n/a |
          |  4.0 /  3.4 /  6.6 |  4.9 /  3.4 /  6.7 |  6.1 /  3.4 /  7.1 |  7.0 /  3.7 /  7.6 |  8.9 /  7.0 /  8.8 |
          |  4.1 /  3.5 /  5.0 |  4.4 /  3.4 /  5.1 |  4.5 /  3.4 /  5.2 |  4.9 /  3.6 /  9.9 |  6.8 /  6.5 / 19.2 |


   1048576
          |  9.7 / 11.0 /  n/a |  9.9 / 11.1 /  n/a | 10.2 / 10.7 /  n/a | 10.7 / 10.7 /  n/a | 10.7 / 11.2 /  n/a |
          |  5.0 /  4.4 /  7.5 |  5.9 /  4.4 /  7.7 |  7.1 /  4.4 /  8.1 |  8.0 /  4.6 /  8.5 |  9.7 /  7.3 /  9.8 |
          |  5.1 /  4.4 /  n/a |  5.3 /  4.4 /  n/a |  5.5 /  4.4 /  n/a |  5.9 /  4.6 /  n/a |  7.7 /  6.8 /  n/a |


   2097152
          | 10.8 / 12.0 /  n/a | 11.0 / 12.1 /  n/a | 11.3 / 11.8 /  n/a | 12.1 / 11.8 /  n/a | 12.0 / 12.1 /  n/a |
          |  6.0 /  5.4 /  8.5 |  7.0 /  5.4 /  8.7 |  8.1 /  5.4 /  9.1 |  9.0 /  5.6 /  9.5 | 10.6 /  7.6 / 10.3 |
          |  6.1 /  5.4 /  n/a |  6.4 /  5.4 /  n/a |  6.6 /  5.4 /  n/a |  6.9 /  5.6 /  n/a |  8.8 /  7.2 /  n/a |


   4194304
          | 11.9 / 13.0 /  n/a | 12.0 / 13.1 /  n/a | 12.5 / 12.9 /  n/a | 13.3 / 12.8 /  n/a | 13.2 / 13.0 /  n/a |
          |  7.0 /  6.4 /  9.5 |  8.0 /  6.4 /  9.7 |  9.2 /  6.4 / 10.1 | 10.1 /  6.5 / 10.5 | 11.6 /  8.0 / 11.1 |
          |  7.1 /  6.4 /  n/a |  7.3 /  6.4 /  n/a |  7.6 /  6.4 /  n/a |  8.0 /  6.5 /  n/a |  9.9 /  7.7 /  n/a |


   8388608
          |  n/a /  n/a /  n/a |  n/a /  n/a /  n/a | 13.7 / 14.1 /  n/a | 14.5 / 13.8 /  n/a | 14.4 / 13.9 /  n/a |
          |  8.0 /  7.4 / 10.5 |  9.0 /  7.4 / 10.7 | 10.2 /  7.4 / 11.1 | 11.1 /  7.5 / 11.5 | 12.6 /  8.5 / 12.0 |
          |  8.1 /  7.4 /  n/a |  8.4 /  7.4 /  n/a |  8.6 /  7.4 /  n/a |  9.1 /  7.5 /  n/a | 10.8 /  8.3 /  n/a |


 16777216
         |  n/a /  n/a /  n/a |  n/a /  n/a /  n/a |  n/a /  n/a /  n/a |  n/a /  n/a /  n/a |  n/a /  n/a /  n/a |
         |  9.0 /  8.4 / 11.6 | 10.0 /  8.4 / 11.7 | 11.2 /  8.4 / 12.1 | 12.2 /  8.4 / 12.5 | 13.6 /  9.1 / 12.9 |
         |  9.1 /  8.4 /  n/a |  9.3 /  8.4 /  n/a |  9.6 /  8.4 /  n/a | 10.1 /  8.4 /  n/a | 11.9 /  9.0 /  n/a |

Flaws of the test

All rows with less than 100 values were not shown, as they are of no practical importance and can instead be thought of as warming-up.

All tests were performed only once, no smoothing has been done, so spikes in either direction are possible. The tests for values over 10000 were running for a reasonably long time to at least exclude short spikes. I repeated the whole benchmark a few times, and the differences were within 10%.

The data structures have not been initialized with the proper amount of elements they may expect to hold. This was, partially, due to the memory consumption with larger sets.

There are no values for OMD Dequeuing, as I found no reasonable approach to implement this yet. I would appreciate any help on this.

Results

The results are pretty consistent for larger values.

  1. For smaller bucket counts (number of distinct values), both option 2 or 3-based approaches are several times faster than the OMD at enqueuing and even more at enumeration. No comparison exists for dequeuing.
  2. For larger bucket counts, the OMD does not slow down, while option 2+3 do (factor 10). Eventually option 2 is slightly worse at enqueueing but still extremely fast at enumerating, option 3 (the simple Dictionary) beats both.
  3. However, option 3 gets terrible at dequeuing for large bucket numbers, to the point of definite non-usability. This is due to the permanent search for the minimum key that does not exist in the SortedDictionary.

Regarding memory usage, the OMD used up several times more memory than option 2 and 3, and consistently threw OutOfMemory exceptions for more than 5 million values. Option 3 again used noticably less memory than option 2. After each single test, a complete garbage collection was enforced.

In conclusion, I recommend to use a SortedDictionary of Queues, as it tends to be as least as fast as the RB-tree approach that was used in the Power Collections while using less memory. The advantage increases if there are few distinct priority values. Of course, this only matters if you're dealing with large amounts of data.

Source code

adding the source code of the SortedDictionary. More can be found at http://pastebin.com/J4snVYzb

public class PriorityQueue<TK, TV>
{
    private readonly SortedDictionary<TK, Queue<TV>> _D = new SortedDictionary<TK, Queue<TV>> ();

    public void Enqueue (TK key, TV value)
    {
        Queue<TV> list;
        if (!_D.TryGetValue (key, out list)) {
            list = new Queue<TV> ();
            _D.Add (key, list);
        }
        list.Enqueue (value);
        Count++;
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    public TV Dequeue ()
    {
        var first = _D.First ();
        var item = first.Value.Dequeue ();
        if (!first.Value.Any ()) {
            _D.Remove (first.Key);
        }
        return item;
    }

    public IEnumerable<TV> Values
    {
        get
        {
            var keys = _D.Keys.ToArray ();
            foreach (var key in keys) {
                foreach (var item in _D[key]) {
                    yield return item;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
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how can you type so fast? :) –  David Mar 28 '13 at 14:14
2  
Monkeys. Lots of monkeys. –  mafu Mar 28 '13 at 14:18
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