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I want to write a function that works for any derived classes in a certain hierarchy, without modifying the abstract class input parameter:

class A {
public:
    A(int val): m_i(val) { }
    virtual void add(int i) = 0;

    int m_i;
};

class B: public A {
public:
    B(int val): A(val) { }
    B(): A(0) { }
    virtual void add(int i) { m_i += i; }
};

class C: public A {
public:
    C(int val): A(val) { }
    C(): A(0) { }
    virtual void add(int i) { m_i += i*2; }
};

int f(const A& base_class)
{
    // how to create a concrete copy of class base_class?
    base_class.add(5);
}

Here f() should work for both B and C, but I can't create a copy of the concrete class because I don't know the actual type, unless I use dynamic_cast.

Is there another approach to solve this problem or should just use dynamic_cast?

share|improve this question
    
why does f() need to make a copy? –  andre Mar 28 '13 at 14:33
    
Note that the issue here isn't about abstract classes, but about base class references in general. –  Pete Becker Mar 28 '13 at 14:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The typical approach commonly known as the virtual constructor idiom is to define another virtual method for cloning the concrete class, make it virtual in the abstract base, and call it as needed to produce instances of the desired class without knowing its type:

class A {
public:
    A(int val): m_i(val) { }
    virtual void add(int i) = 0;
    virtual A* clone() const = 0; // Override in derived classes to return new B/C
    int m_i;
};
share|improve this answer

The problem is that you are passing const A& but add is not a const method if you take away the const modifier then this works:

int f(A& base_class)
{
    // how to create a concrete copy of class base_class?
   base_class.add(5);

   ///Need a return here
}

I am using gcc and the error that really tells you what is going is this:

error: no matching function for call to 'A::add(int&) const'
  base_class.add(a);                                  ^^^^^  

no known conversion for implicit 'this' parameter from 'const A*' to 'A*'
                                                        ^^^^^^^^

Based on your response the other option is make m_i mutable and make the member methods const like so:

class A {
  public:
    A(int val): m_i(val) { }
    virtual void add(int i) const = 0;

  protected:
    mutable int m_i;
};

class B: public A {
 public:
    B(int val): A(val) { }
    B(): A(0) { }
    virtual void add(int i) const { m_i += i; }
};

class C: public A {
  public:
    C(int val): A(val) { }
    C(): A(0) { }
    virtual void add(int i) const { m_i += i*2; }
};

int f(const  A& base_class)
{
    base_class.add(5) ;

    //Need a return here
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't want to modify the input parameter. –  Robert Kubrick Mar 28 '13 at 14:42
    
@RobertKubrick add mutates the class so you can not pass it as const and call add as well. If there is another const function you want to call instead of add then that would work to. –  Shafik Yaghmour Mar 28 '13 at 14:44
    
@RobertKubrick unless you want to declare m_i as mutable –  Shafik Yaghmour Mar 28 '13 at 14:48
    
@RobertKubrick Added example w/ m_i as mutable –  Shafik Yaghmour Mar 28 '13 at 14:52

It is not clear from your question why you even need to make a copy.

However, if you do, you could have a clone() method:

class A {
public:
    virtual A* clone() const = 0;
};

class B: public A {
public:
    virtual B* clone() const { return new(*this); }
};

class C: public A {
public:
    virtual C* clone() const { return new(*this); }
};
share|improve this answer
    
I need to make a copy because I can't modify the input const reference directly. I can't call add() on that parameter and I cant' change the function signature. –  Robert Kubrick Mar 28 '13 at 14:41

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