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#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

class Base
{
public:
    Base()
    {
        cout << "Base"<<endl;
    }
    ~Base()
    {
        cout << "~Base"<<endl;
    }

};

class Child: public Base
{
public:
    Child()
    {
        cout << "Child"<<endl;
    }
    ~Child()
    {
        cout << "~Child"<<endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    try
    {
        Child cc;
    }
    catch(...)
    {
    }

    return 0;
}

the general output will be

Base 
Child
~Child
~Base

But if something terrible or exception caught while Base is constructor ,then is it possible that the sequece will be :

Base 
~Base
Child
~Child

Can anyone write a demo to illustate this? C++ usually doesn't throw exception in the constuctor, but if it does, then could it leads to that output?

Thanks for all helping. I am not sure that in usually code ,this could happens. Is it possible in complicated Base constructor or something wrong or whatever,that will change the usual output ? If so, can anyone give me one example?

share|improve this question
1  
why can't you "write a demo to illustrate this" yourself? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 28 '13 at 14:46
    
I write some test code, but it seems C++ doesn't support stack rescroll, after got exception, the desctructor will not be called. –  python Mar 28 '13 at 14:48
    
I write some test code, but after caught exception, the destructor will not be called. Is there a way to illustrate that if something wrong or exception happens while at constuctor Base , the output will be Base() ~Base() Child() ~Child(). –  python Mar 28 '13 at 14:50

2 Answers 2

If a exception occurs in your Base class constructor no destructors are called.
Simply because there is no complete object that needs to be destroyed!

Can't help but quote Herb on this:

"It cannot die, for it never lived!"

share|improve this answer
include <stdexcept>
Base()
{
    cout << "Base"<<endl;
    throw std::runtime_error("error");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Did you test this? –  mfontanini Mar 28 '13 at 14:47
    
Unless you really know this works, you should try it. Right? –  mfontanini Mar 28 '13 at 14:50
    
He just wanted a test for it so he can find out himself experimentally –  FatihK Mar 28 '13 at 14:51
    
I tried you way, it seems that after B constructor calls, no other will be called. –  python Mar 28 '13 at 14:56

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