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In the following code-snippet,

1) Does the try-catch block automatically calls "conn.rollback()" before calling "conn.close()" (by AutoClose)? If not,do I have to add a finally { conn.rollback(); } to that block ?

2) Is the way Connection object passed in to the bar() method ,and the try-catch method in it correct?

public void foo() {
        try (Connection conn = datasource.getConnection()) {

            bar(conn, "arg");
            conn.commit();

        } catch (SQLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

    public void bar(Connection conn, String args) throws SQLException {
        try (PreparedStatement ps = conn.prepareStatement("SOME_QUERY")) {
            // Do something
            ps.executeUpdate();
        } catch (SQLException err) {
            throw err;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

A try-with-resources will simply call the close() method on the Connection. The effect of calling Connection.close() when a transaction is active is implementation defined:

It is strongly recommended that an application explicitly commits or rolls back an active transaction prior to calling the close method. If the close method is called and there is an active transaction, the results are implementation-defined.

In other words: don't depend on it and explicitly call commit() or rollback() as the actual behavior will vary between drivers, maybe even between versions of the same driver.

Given your example I'd suggest:

public void foo() {
    try (Connection conn = datasource.getConnection()) {
        bar(conn, "arg");
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

public void bar(Connection conn, String args) throws SQLException {
    try (PreparedStatement ps = conn.prepareStatement("SOME_QUERY")) {
        // Do something
        ps.executeUpdate();
        conn.commit();
    } catch (SQLException err) {
        conn.rollback();
        throw err;
    }
}

Since you can't use conn in the catch or finally block of the try that created it, you could also nest it:

public void foo() {
    try (Connection conn = datasource.getConnection()) {
        try {
            bar(conn, "arg");
            conn.commit();
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            conn.rollback();
            throw ex;
        }
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the anwer.sorry I forgot to add the commit() in the foo().When does the PreparedStatement created in the bar() methods closes? – Ashika Umanga Umagiliya Mar 28 '13 at 15:14
    
in the link it says : "Note:A try-with-resources statement can have catch and finally blocks just like an ordinary try statement. In a try-with-resources statement, any catch or finally block is run after the resources declared have been closed." So where shall I call "conn.rollback()"? I cannot call it after "conn.close()" is called, can I ? – Ashika Umanga Umagiliya Mar 28 '13 at 15:26
1  
You're right, I got that mixed up. But as you can't access the objects created in the try (including the resources) in the catch or finally block, that is not really relevant in this specific case. (I removed my previous comment so I won't confuse anyone else, link was: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/… ) – Mark Rotteveel Mar 28 '13 at 15:30
1  
In any case, where you call commit() or rollback() is not related to the closing of the PreparedStatement in bar(), which is what your first comment asked for. And given the scope rules, you won't even be able to call those methods after the conn has been closed. – Mark Rotteveel Mar 28 '13 at 15:37

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