Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am beginner to C language and a thing that I can't understand very well is the use of malloc. So I decide to create this example. I would like to understand why it doesn't print out the buffer data and what is the best practice to do this.

#include <stdio.h>      /* printf, scanf, NULL */
#include <stdlib.h>     /* malloc, free, rand */

void f(char * buffer, int i) {
  buffer = (char *) malloc(i+1);
  if (buffer==NULL) 
    exit (1);

  for (int n=0; n<i; n++)
    buffer[n]=rand()%26+'a';

  buffer[i]='\0';
}

int main ()
{
  char * buffer;
  f(buffer, 5);
  printf ("Random string: %s\n",buffer);
  free (buffer);

  return 0;
}

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Does it print "Random string: "? –  Eric Smekens Mar 28 '13 at 15:13
    
Yep...It prints –  Leandro Lima Mar 28 '13 at 15:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your buffer = (char *) malloc(i+1); has no effect outside the function. In effect the function is changing its own copy of buffer, and the caller (main) never sees this change. This is all very well explained in a C FAQ.

Instead of passing it as a parameter, you could return the buffer, since the function doesn't return anything at the moment:

char *f(int i)
    /* ... */
    return buffer;

/* ... */

char * buffer = f(5); 

  • In C casting malloc is a unnecessary, and often considered a dubious practice
  • The n and i variable names are somewhat misleading: one expects them the other way around
  • f is not a goot name for a function
share|improve this answer
    
My doubt is, if I create a pointer inside a function scope, returning it, it will remain valid outside the function? I mean, at the end of the function, the pointer doesn't exist anymore... –  Leandro Lima Mar 28 '13 at 15:23
    
@Leandro You're right to worry. But think of it this way: the pointer itself doesn't exist anymore, that's for sure. But just before it got destroyed, it managed to convey its contents, in effect an address. So now someone else (buffer from main) holds that address. So it's safe, f can safely kill all its local variables. –  cnicutar Mar 28 '13 at 15:26
    
Thank you @cnicutar, It helps me too much. Thank you too much! –  Leandro Lima Mar 28 '13 at 15:34

In order to modify pointer passed to the function, you have to use pointer to pointer:

void f(char** buffer, int i) {
  *buffer = malloc(i+1);
  if (*buffer==NULL) 
    exit (1);

  for (int n=0; n<i; n++)
    (*buffer)[n]=rand()%26+'a';

  (*buffer)[i]='\0';
}

Usage:

char* buff;

f(&buff, len);
share|improve this answer
1  
Don't forget to mention how to pass the buffer to the function. –  user1944441 Mar 28 '13 at 15:18
    
Thanks Alex. I'd like to know also if this is the best practice for this type of problem... –  Leandro Lima Mar 28 '13 at 15:18
    
@Armin fixed, thanks –  Alex Mar 28 '13 at 15:20
    
in the case where I'm trying to change the value of a int, like f(int i), is it the same? f(int ** i)? –  Leandro Lima Apr 1 '13 at 16:26

Variables are passed by value to functions.

When you call f(buffer, 5), then it does not pass the variable buffer to function f; it only copies the value of the variable buffer. In function f, a new variable named buffer (the parameter variable) is created. When you change the value of that variable, the original variable that you passed in from main is not affected.

Different ways to solve this:

Make f return the pointer, and save it in buffer in main:

char * f(int i) {
    char * buffer = malloc(i + 1);

    /* ... */

    return buffer;
}

int main() {
    char * buffer = f(5);

    /* ... */

    return 0;
}

Or pass a pointer to a pointer to f; in main, pass the address of buffer:

void f(char ** buffer, int i) {
    *buffer = malloc(i + 1);

    /* ... */
}

int main() {
    char * buffer;
    f(&buffer, 5);

    /* ... */

    return 0;
}        
share|improve this answer

You cannot change the original value of variables that were passed-by-value.

If you want to malloc in a function, and return the result of malloc in a variable, then that variable must be passed-by-reference.

E.g. instead of:

void f(char * buffer, int i);

It should be:

void f(char **buffer, int i);
share|improve this answer

CNICUTAR is right, but here are interesting information :

MALLOC :

Don't cast malloc (here is an interesting topic about it : Do I cast the result of malloc?).

FOR LOOP :

For the for loop you should use this way (C89 version) :

int i;
for (i = 0; ...)

Regards,

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks by the tip Joze! –  Leandro Lima Mar 28 '13 at 15:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.