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I just assigned an ip to a char array and printed it to make sure it was right and got the following results:

int
main(void)
{
    char ip [11] = "65.55.57.27";
    printf(ip);
    return 0;
}

I get

65.55.57.270 "

But if I increase the array size to 12

int
main(void)
{
    char ip [12] = "65.55.57.27";
    printf(ip);
    return 0;
}

I get

65.55.57.27

Can anyone explain this? Why is it that the array of size 11 return a 13 char result while the array of size 12 returns a 11 char result?

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4  
Please decide which language you're actually interested in. This is not C#. –  Jon Skeet Mar 28 '13 at 16:17

2 Answers 2

The array in

char ip [11] = "65.55.57.27";

has no space for the NUL terminator since the string literal is exactly 11 characters long.

This results in

printf(ip);

having undefined behaviour.

Either of the following would fix the problem:

char ip [12] = "65.55.57.27";
char ip [] = "65.55.57.27";
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Just to add to this answer. Run in any good C IDE this 11 length gives out a descriptive error as well initializer-string for array of chars is too long –  Hanky 웃 Panky Mar 28 '13 at 16:21
    
@HankyPankyㇱ: Actually, in this particular case I wouldn't expect to get a warning (of course if ip was declared as char ip[10], that would be a different kettle of fish altogether). –  NPE Mar 28 '13 at 16:23
    
@NPE why not? The string is 12 chars long. –  Aneri Mar 28 '13 at 16:24
    
That's true but when I ran OP's code I saw that warning so I thought I'll add it here to complement your answer –  Hanky 웃 Panky Mar 28 '13 at 16:25
    
@Aneri: I think it's reasonable for the compiler to think that, if I went through the trouble of explicitly specifying the size of the array, and it happens to match exactly the length of the string literal, that I simply don't want the NUL. This is certainly how gcc behaves, and I think it's spot-on. –  NPE Mar 28 '13 at 16:27

You made space for 11 bytes but there also exists the implicit null byte \0 in your char array:

>> ip

   {'6', '5', '.', '5', '5', '.', '5', '7', '.', '2', '7', '\0'}

Hence your array has 12 elements in it, 1 too many for the size. You should have gotten an error on your compiler. This is what I got:

error: initializer-string for char array is too long

I don't like to deal with these trivial problems; that's why I use std::string:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::string str = "65.55.57.27";

    std::cout << str;
}

Live Demo

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