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I see this idiom of initializing instance variables quite a bit

public class Test{
    private Long l = 1l;
    private MyClass mc = new MyClass();

    public Test(){}
    ...
 }

But I would prefer

public class Test{
    private Long l;
    private MyClass mc;

    public Test(){
        l = 1l;
        mc = new MyClass();
    }
    ...
}

Considering that these are non-final variables, are the 2 approaches equivalent or is one "more" correct than the other in terms of thread safety?

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1  
on readability; I would prefer you to either use an uppercase L for the long constant or leave it out as the compiler has no problem promoting the value 1 to long. (A lowercase l is easily confused with 1.) Also note the syntax eror in variant 1: missing identifier mc :-) –  rsp Oct 14 '09 at 20:42
    
Yes yes indeed missing mc but luckily you got the point...however my compiler never allows me to do Long l = 1;...if yours does let me know which javac you are using. –  non sequitor Oct 14 '09 at 20:47
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Thread safety isn't an issue because this happens at construction phase, and two threads cannot be constructing the same object. Well, if you let this escape from the constructor, it might be possible for another thread to access the object during construction, but you really shouldn't do that. Functionality-wise, the two options are the same, so even if there were thread-safety issues, they would affect both the same way.

The first option, of initializing the fields at their declaration, is not always possible if you need to do some computation that cannot be done in an initializer (even then, you can keep the initialization out of the constructor if you do it in an initializer block, though). But if either way is possible, then it's purely a style issue, and I don't think there is a clear preference among Java programmers, so go with whichever seems better to you.

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+1 for mentioning the one way that instance variables can get manipulated by another thread while the constructor is executing. However, even making this possible seems like an abuse of a constructor. If you have to do that much initialization, I would put it in a separate method anyway. –  Daniel Pryden Oct 14 '09 at 20:36
    
I just want to mention, that you can do a lot of computations in the instance initializer block ( {} blocks inside the class body ). However I would not recommend using them for general case described in the question ( they are invaluable when doing Java version of closures ). If you need computation, do it in the constructor, or static factory method. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Oct 14 '09 at 20:45
    
@Daniel: It is unfortunately very common that people let "this" escape from the constructor while creating and starting threads (if this implements Runnable), adding themselves as listeners to others etc. FindBugs will catch it but I see it too often to say people understand why it is dangerous. –  Fredrik Oct 18 '09 at 20:14
1  
This answer is, unfortunately, wrong. Making the fields final would be the best solution if the object is immutable. java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/… has more on the importance of final fields in immutable objects that need to be thread safe. –  MB. Oct 6 '10 at 10:01
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since your variables are instance variables, not class variables, you don't have a thread safety issue during initialization using either method. I'm sure others will chime in if there's a Java-standard-recommended best practice.

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@atk: Are you saying that if those were "static" variables there would be a thread safety issue, by my understanding static initialization is guaranteed thread-safe according to the JMM. –  non sequitor Oct 14 '09 at 20:38
    
And, of course, we wouldn't be initializing the "static" variables in the constructor either, so it would either be initialized like above or in a static block which is also thread safe –  non sequitor Oct 14 '09 at 20:40
    
@non sequitor: Yes, there would be a thread safety risk with static variables. Static variables are class-wide instead of instance-specific. Initializing static variables in a constructor may be non-threadsafe if no additional locking is performed. "static initialization" is a different thing than "initializing a static variable". "static initialization" is the OP's first example (if it were with static variables) or within a "static {}" block –  atk Oct 14 '09 at 20:45
    
@atk: my second comment ruled out initializing static variables in the constructor, I've never even tried that -- it shouldn't even be legal to initialize a static variable in a constructor, goes against the spirit of the concepts –  non sequitor Oct 14 '09 at 21:06
    
@non sequitor: Apologies. I didn't realize that you considered the issue ruled out - I thought your initial response was still standing. However, under certain circumstances, it can be appropriate to use or initialize statics in constructors. I realize we haven't been talking about use, but it's probably worth covering. A simple example of use would be counting the number of instances of the class. –  atk Oct 15 '09 at 2:15
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I think it's the matter of personal preference and your project coding standards.

Just make sure you only initialize variables in one place ( either constructor, or inline ).

Having initialization work done in the constructor gives you a better place for exception handling.

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They are both not thread-safe. If thread A constructs the object, then thread B may or may not observer an incompletely initialized Test object or MyClass object. The visibility guarantees after a constructor exits only apply to final fields.

See http://pveentjer.wordpress.com/2007/03/18/immutability-doesnt-guarantee-thread-safety/

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In terms of thread safety, they are equivalent. Both will need to execute the same instructions, and if you prefer the second (which I agree with you in your preference) then I would use that. If you want thread safety around a constructor, you would need a synchronized call around the constructor call.

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as atk noted, I am not sure that there even ARE thread safety issues here, unless the object is stored in a globally accessible location. –  aperkins Oct 14 '09 at 20:23
    
If you make the field final (which ever equivalent piece of code you use) and don't let this escape by the end of the constructor, then the instance will be safe from unsafe publication. In reality, unsafe publication is relatively rare (or at least it is rarely done on purpose). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 14 '09 at 20:32
    
I am aware that unsafe publication is rarely done on purpose, I was simply pointing it out in case they made that mistake - it is a difficult one to track down sometimes :) –  aperkins Oct 14 '09 at 20:34
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