Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a method inside which it calls the .NET XDocument.Load() method to load the xml data from a url. I'd like to make my class unit testable.

So how to make that call mockable/unit testable?

private void ProcessData(string url)
{
            // todo: make this mockable
            var xDocument = XDocument.Load(url);
            // the rest of the code
}

One solution I've used is to inject an xmlUrlLoader into the clas like below:

private readonly Func<string, XDocument> _xmlUrlLoader;

public MyConstructor(Func<string,XDocument> xmlUrlLoader)
{
    _xmlUrlLoader = xmlUrlLoader;
}
private void ProcessData(string url)
{
            // todo: make this mockable
            var xDocument = this._xmlUrlLoader(url);
            // the rest of the code
}

Is there any better way?

share|improve this question
1  
I'd move the responsibility for the url loading one level up. So there is one function that takes the data as string or XDocument and processes it, and then a thin wrapper over it that downloads the data and passes it to the processing function. No mocking needed. – CodesInChaos Mar 28 '13 at 16:59
    
If i where you, i simply pass xDocument to this method. – Kirill Bestemyanov Mar 28 '13 at 17:01
    
@KirillBestemyanov I can't pass xDocument to it; I don't want to call xDocument.Load, that should be mocked/isolated. – The Light Mar 28 '13 at 17:02
    
XDocument.Load doesn't take urls, it only takes filenames. So how does your code work at all? – CodesInChaos Mar 28 '13 at 18:49
    
@CodesInChaos nope, it accepts a Uri (either local or external); msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/bb343181.aspx that's the easiest way to load an Xml file over the web :) – The Light Mar 28 '13 at 19:01
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I agree that injecting a loader is the correct approach I'm not sure why it would be of type Func

I would expect an interface along the lines of

public interface IXmlDocumentLoader
{
    XDocument LoadDocument(string url);
}

and then your code would look like

private readonly IXmlDocumentLoader _xmlUrlLoader;

public MyConstructor(IXmlDocumentLoader xmlUrlLoader)
{
    _xmlUrlLoader = xmlUrlLoader;
}

private void ProcessData(string url)
{
            var xDocument = this._xmlUrlLoader(url);
            // the rest of the code
}

But I think that for reasons of separation of concerns the document loader should definitely be in its own class.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks to be a valid simple approach of injecting a dependency. The downside is that I'd have to create a wrapper that will be part of production code but won't be unit testable. – The Light Mar 28 '13 at 18:31

I prefer separating logic from accessing resources. In your case I'd pass the document to the processing function:

void ProcessData(XDocument xDocument);

You can test that function without mocking anything. Then if you want you can add a thin wrapper on top that does the loading.

void ProcessUrl(string url);
{
    var xDocument = XDocument.Load(url);
    ProcessData(xDocument);
}

You can use mocking to unit test the wrapper, but personally I don't see much gain in that. I prefer to exercise those wrappers only as part of integration tests.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand your point on separating the logic from accessing resourcing which is a valid point for readability improvement (arguably) but the above wouldn't solve the issue I raised, how would you mock it? creating an interface and a wrapper? – The Light Mar 28 '13 at 18:28
1  
@TheLight I'd mainly test the version taking an XDocument without mocking anything. I can't say how or if I'd test the wrapper without context. Possibly with an IFileSystem interface, and possibly only with integration tests. | What you mock and how you test is a stylistic issue, and I prefer mocking as little as possible. Other people have different preferences. – CodesInChaos Mar 28 '13 at 18:54
    
I meant the wrapper that runs XDocument.Load(). I'd consider ProcessUrl() method a unit of test although it calls another method so that's why I need to mock. Units of tests don't always have to be one property or one single method. A collection of methods and even classes can be tested and they'd be unit tests still. If I'd be testing the integration of my codse with other external resources/systems (files, database, other web services), then I'd refer to them as integration tests. Otherwise, it's all unit tests. – The Light Mar 28 '13 at 18:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.