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I am fairly new to awk and it's my first question I am asking. In case my problem was already answered please direct me to the right one. Thanks. So far I neither found a solution nor did I manage to achieve the output I want. Let's assume I have scientific data, all numbers arranged in a single column but represent an intensities matrix of n(width) by m(height). The column of the input file has in total n*m rows. An input example may look like that:

1
2
3
......
30

The new output should be such that I have n new columns with m rows. Sticking to my example with 30 fields input and n=3, m=10 I would need an output file like this (seperator does not matter much, could be a blank, a tab etc.):

1 11 21
2 12 22
... ... ....
10 20 30

I use gawk under Windows. Please note that there are no special FS, more real-world exsampls are like 60*60 or bigger. Thanks for all answers or advice.

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3 Answers 3

If you are not limited to awk but have GNU core-utils (cygwin, native, ..) then the simplest solution is to use pr:

pr -ts" " --columns 3 file
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Thank you very much for this need solution, perfect with core-utils but the awk solution is more flexible if the number of lines of input does not match n*m output. Still, pleased with a new useful command. –  greta Apr 4 '13 at 21:17

I believe this will do:

awk '
  { split($0,data); }
  END {
     m = 10;
     n = 3;
     for( i = 1; i<=m; i++ ) {
        for( j = 0; j<n; j++ ) {
            printf "%s ", data[j*m + i] # output data plus space in one line
        }
        # here you might want to start a new line though you did not ask for it:
        printf "\n"; 
     }
  }' inputfile

I might have the index counting wrong but I am sure you can figure it out. The trick is the split in the first line. It splits your input on whitespace and creates an array data. The END block runs after processing your file and just accesses data by index. Note array indices count from 0.

Assumption is all data is in a single line. Your question isn't quite clear on this. If it is on several lines you'd have to read it into the array differently.

Hope this gets you started.

EDIT I notice you changed your question while I was answering it. So change

{ split($0,data); }

to

{ data[++i] = $1; }

to account for the input being on different lines. Actually, this would give you the option to read it into a two dimensional array in the first place.

EDIT 2

Read two dimensional array To read as a two dimensional array assuming m and n are known beforehand and not encoded in the input somehow:

awk '
  BEGIN {
     m = 10;
     n = 3;
  }
  { 
     for( i = 0; i<m; i++ ) {
        for( j = 0; j<n; j++ ) {
            data[i,j] = $0;
        }
     }
     # do something with data
  }' inputfile

However, since you only want to reformat your data you could do it immediately. Combining the two solutions getting rid of data and passing m and n on the command line:

awk -v m=10 -v n=3'
  { 
     for( i = 0; i<m; i++ ) {
        for( j = 0; j<n; j++ ) {
            printf "%s ", $0     # output data plus space in one line
        }
        printf "\n";
     }
  }' inputfile
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Dear Michael, many thanks for your answer. It works perfect, indexing is spot on. Sorry for late response, i was away over Easter. The trick is really how to read the input. Would you mind to explain your last sentence how to read data in a 2dim array? The data are in just one long single column, indeed (got the formatting wrong in the first instance). Thanks a lot for your help. –  greta Apr 4 '13 at 21:26
    
I've edited the answer accordingly. –  Michael Lemke Apr 5 '13 at 9:29

Here is a fairly simple solution (in the example I've set n equal to 3; plug in the appropriate value for n):

awk -v n=3 '{ row = row $1 " "; if (NR % n == 0) { print row; row = "" } }' FILE

This works by reading in records one line at a time concatenating each line with the preceding lines. When n lines have been concatenated, it prints the concatenated result on a single new line. This repeats until there are no more lines left in the input.

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