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Python print isn't using __repr__, __unicode__ or __str__ for my unicode subclass when printing. Any clues as to what I am doing wrong?

Here is my code:

Using Python 2.5.2 (r252:60911, Oct 13 2009, 14:11:59)

>>> class MyUni(unicode):
...     def __repr__(self):
...         return "__repr__"
...     def __unicode__(self):
...         return unicode("__unicode__")
...     def __str__(self):
...         return str("__str__")
...      
>>> s = MyUni("HI")
>>> s
'__repr__'
>>> print s
'HI'

I'm not sure if this is an accurate approximation of the above, but just for comparison:

>>> class MyUni(object):
...     def __new__(cls, s):
...         return super(MyUni, cls).__new__(cls)
...     def __repr__(self):
...         return "__repr__"
...     def __unicode__(self):
...         return unicode("__unicode__")
...     def __str__(self):
...         return str("__str__")
...
>>> s = MyUni("HI")
>>> s
'__repr__'
>>> print s
'__str__'

[EDITED...] It sounds like the best way to get a string object that isinstance(instance, basestring) and offers control over unicode return values, and with a unicode repr is...

>>> class UserUnicode(str):
...     def __repr__(self):
...         return "u'%s'" % super(UserUnicode, self).__str__()
...     def __str__(self):
...         return super(UserUnicode, self).__str__()
...     def __unicode__(self):
...         return unicode(super(UserUnicode, self).__str__())
...
>>> s = UserUnicode("HI")
>>> s
u'HI'
>>> print s
'HI'
>>> len(s)
2

The _str_ and _repr_ above add nothing to this example but the idea is to show a pattern explicitly, to be extended as needed.

Just to prove that this pattern grants control:

>>> class UserUnicode(str):
...     def __repr__(self):
...         return "u'%s'" % "__repr__"
...     def __str__(self):
...         return "__str__"
...     def __unicode__(self):
...         return unicode("__unicode__")
... 
>>> s = UserUnicode("HI")
>>> s
u'__repr__'
>>> print s
'__str__'

Thoughts?

share|improve this question
1  
Is your code really indented like the first example? – GreenMatt Mar 28 '13 at 16:54
1  
I had to guess as to what your question is. If I got it wrong, please do update your post to include an actual, clear question. – Martijn Pieters Mar 28 '13 at 16:54
    
Though this is a nice gotcha, I would like to ask why in h*** you would like to subclass str or unicode? I mean, the data will be immutable, so it the resulting object will be quite useless. – Kay Mar 28 '13 at 17:34
    
I added some more after [Edited...]. Feels gross but I don't think it breaks any Pythonic expectations. repr is a string representation that could be used to build a unicode object if needed, right? – Rafe Mar 28 '13 at 22:52
    
@Kay: Not useless at all. I've used it to create a name-convention object model for a 3D graphics software package. Basically making a name a special type of string that encapsulates utilities for working with the convention but can still be passed to the native API transparently. The 3D app is mostly unicode so I was trying to be consistent. However, in the case of this thread, I am wrapping an API object and I want the return value of my class to be dynamic, so it only mimics a true string - just has to pass isinstance(instance, basestring)...don't ask... – Rafe Mar 28 '13 at 22:59
up vote 9 down vote accepted

The problem is that print doesn't respect __str__ on unicode subclasses.

From PyFile_WriteObject, used by print:

int
PyFile_WriteObject(PyObject *v, PyObject *f, int flags)
{
...
        if ((flags & Py_PRINT_RAW) &&
    PyUnicode_Check(v) && enc != Py_None) {
    char *cenc = PyString_AS_STRING(enc);
    char *errors = fobj->f_errors == Py_None ? 
      "strict" : PyString_AS_STRING(fobj->f_errors);
    value = PyUnicode_AsEncodedString(v, cenc, errors);
    if (value == NULL)
        return -1;

PyUnicode_Check(v) returns true if v's type is unicode or a subclass. This code therefore writes unicode objects directly, without consulting __str__.

Note that subclassing str and overriding __str__ works as expected:

>>> class mystr(str):
...     def __str__(self): return "str"
...     def __repr__(self): return "repr"
... 
>>> print mystr()
str

as does calling str or unicode explicitly:

>>> class myuni(unicode):
...     def __str__(self): return "str"
...     def __repr__(self): return "repr"
...     def __unicode__(self): return "unicode"
... 
>>> print myuni()

>>> str(myuni())
'str'
>>> unicode(myuni())
u'unicode'

I believe this could be construed as a bug in Python as currently implemented.

share|improve this answer

You are subclassing unicode.

It'll never call __unicode__ because it already is unicode. What happens here instead is that the object is encoded to the stdout encoding:

>>> s.encode('utf8')
'HI'

except that it'll use direct C calls instead of the .encode() method. This is the default behaviour for print for unicode objects.

The print statement calls PyFile_WriteObject, which in turn calls PyUnicode_AsEncodedString when handling a unicode object. The latter then defers to an encoding function for the current encoding, and these use the Unicode C macros to access the data structures directly. You cannot intercept this from Python.

What you are looking for is an __encode__ hook, I guess. Since this is already a unicode subclass, print needs only to encode, not to convert it to unicode again, nor can it convert it to string without encoding it explicitly. You'd have to take this up with the Python core developers, to see if an __encode__ makes sense.

share|improve this answer
1  
@nneonneo: not sure that I agree just yet. :-) – Martijn Pieters Mar 28 '13 at 17:22
1  
Hm, why would it not be a bug? Treatment of str and unicode should be relatively uniform in Python 2.7. – nneonneo Mar 28 '13 at 17:23
1  
@nneonneo: Turning unicode into a str for printing requires encoding. Turning anything else into a string requires calling __str__. Note the second example in the OP post; printing a custom object uses __str__, not __unicode__. – Martijn Pieters Mar 28 '13 at 17:25
1  
@Rafe: but __unicode__ is for converting something to unicode. unicode(yourtype) certainly will call it. But print is not converting, it is encoding instead. You may want to override the encoding behaviour, but there currently is no hook for that. You'd have to discuss that on the Python dev or ideas list instead, as a new feature. – Martijn Pieters Mar 28 '13 at 22:13
1  
@Martijn: That makes sense, but isn't the issue that the unicode sub-class is ignoring str when printing? That is where it feels like a bug to me. If it didn't ignore str I'd be happy. Am I missing your point still? – Rafe Mar 28 '13 at 23:28

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