Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C#, I know how to run a .NET executable from code and also find out if an instance of the executable is already running. What I would like to do is if an instance is already running, obtain an instance of the Foo object within the C# code of a different executable.

I have a windows application, (e.g..NET version of Outlook). A user can use the application as normal, but also running in the background is a process watching for an XML file from a third party system.

What I need is for the watcher process to start the .NET program if it is not running (or obtain a handle if it is), and then call the method CreateEmail on the object instance within the new/existing process.

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to SO :o) –  Fredrik Mörk Oct 14 '09 at 20:29
    
Do you want to obtain a handle to the already running foo.exe process or do you want to get an instance of an object used by foo.exe? Could you clarify what you want to do with the existing process? –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Oct 14 '09 at 20:30
    
Ideally I would like a handle on the object passed to Application.Run... –  Philip Wallace Oct 14 '09 at 20:33
    
What kind of object is that? Would you simply like to execute some action in the already running process? Read some data? It's difficult to help without knowing further details. Could you describe what your applications should do? –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Oct 14 '09 at 20:41
    
I have a windows application, for this example let's say it's a .NET version of Outlook. A user can use the application as normal, but also running in the background is a process watching for an xml file from a third party system. What I need is for the Watcher process to start the .NET Outlook if it is not running (or obtain a handle if it is), and then call the method CreateEmail on the object instance within the new/existing process. –  Philip Wallace Oct 14 '09 at 20:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why don't you just added the FileSystemWatcher to the main application? That's if the background process is doing nothing else but monitoring for the XML files.

If that's not feasible, you could use the NamedPipeServerStream and NamedPipeClientStream to send a "command" from the background process to the main application. When the main application receives this command, it will run the CreateEmail method.

share|improve this answer
    
Or use WCF over a named pipe channel -- saves writing your own protocol down at the byte stream level. –  itowlson Oct 14 '09 at 21:30
    
as of .Net 3.5, .Net now supports named pipes. No writing your own protocol. The NamedPipeServerStream and NamedPipeClientStream are very easy to use for IPC. I did a blog post about it a few weeks ago. eclipsed4utoo.com/blog/… –  Eclipsed4utoo Oct 14 '09 at 22:52
    
Consider the main application as signed and sealed. The watcher is a customer specific tool so I don't want it integrated into the main source code. –  Philip Wallace Oct 15 '09 at 13:21
    
After some quick tests, it seems that using WCF over a named pipe channel gives me exactly what I need. Thanks to Eclipsed4utoo and itowlson for the suggestions! –  Philip Wallace Oct 15 '09 at 16:00

You can activate an object in an already running application using .NET Remoting.

Check out the following sample: About .NET Remoting: Three concepts Compared and Simplified

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent idea. Thank you! –  Philip Wallace Oct 14 '09 at 20:56
    
Remoting is deprecated because it allows processes to fiddle around with each other's internals. This is brittle and can lead to nasty surprises (as you can't control what the external process does to your objects). A better way would be for the target process to host a WCF service: because this is a message-based interface, it insulates the calling process from the implementation of the target process (allowing change) and allows the target process to control what is done to its objects and when (preventing surprises). –  itowlson Oct 14 '09 at 21:28
    
WCF sounds like a good option - I'll look into it. –  Philip Wallace Oct 15 '09 at 13:22

Use the System.Diagnostics.Process class.

To run, you can Process.Start("string path"); and also list current running processes to perform the check.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, but as I had said: "I know how to run a .NET executable (foo.exe) from code and also find out if an instance of the executable is already running" –  Philip Wallace Oct 14 '09 at 20:31
    
Misread, thought it was "need to know", apologies. –  Kyle Rozendo Oct 14 '09 at 20:36
1  
Your title says "How to start a .NET process...", so perhaps that should be removed. –  Ed S. Oct 14 '09 at 20:55
    
Done. Hopefully it's a bit clearer. –  Philip Wallace Oct 14 '09 at 21:02

Well, you can use:

Process.GetProcessesByName(<process Name here>);

which returns Process[].

Check out the static methods of the Process class, they are very intuitive and helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, but as I had said: "I know how to run a .NET executable (foo.exe) from code and also find out if an instance of the executable is already running" –  Philip Wallace Oct 14 '09 at 20:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.