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I want to fire off a timer to execute once at some point in the future. I want to use a lambda expression for code brevity. So I want to do something like...

(new System.Threading.Timer(() => { DoSomething(); },
                    null,  // no state required
                    TimeSpan.FromSeconds(x), // Do it in x seconds
                    TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(-1)); // don't repeat

I think it's pretty tidy. But in this case, the Timer object is not disposed. What is the best way to fix this? Or, should I be doing a totally different approach here?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This will accomplish what you want, but I am not sure its the best solution. I think its something that short and elegant, but might be more confusing and difficult to follow than its worth.

System.Threading.Timer timer = null;
timer = new System.Threading.Timer(
    (object state) => { DoSomething(); timer.Dispose(); }
    , null // no state required
    ,TimeSpan.FromSeconds(x) // Do it in x seconds
    ,TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(-1)); // don't repeat
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what's the scope of timer var? if it is on the stack, when control leaves the method the timer will be disposed of. If not you need to synchronize access to it –  mfeingold Oct 14 '09 at 21:19
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That approach is flawed.
You are creating an object in memory with no reference to it. This means that the timer object is available to be garbage collected. While this code will work some of the time, you cannot predict when a garbage collection will kick in and remove the timer.

For example in the code below I force a garbage collection and it causes the timer to never fire.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    DoThing();
    GC.Collect();
    Thread.Sleep(5000);
}


static void DoThing()
{
    new System.Threading.Timer(x => { Console.WriteLine("Here"); },
            null,  
            TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1), 
            TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(-1));
}
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Correct, but strange. I would have expected that a Timer would be anchored by the Trheading-timer system somehow. –  Henk Holterman Oct 14 '09 at 20:58
    
Good point. I want to do this with a similarly small amount of code but maybe I'll just have to add more code. –  RichAmberale Oct 14 '09 at 21:01
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Instead of using a timer, leverage the thread pool instead:

bool fired = false;

ThreadPool.RegisterWaitForSingleObject(new ManualResetEvent(false), 
	(state, triggered) =>
	{
		fired = true;
	}, 
	0, 9000, true);

GC.Collect();

Thread.Sleep(10000);

Assert.IsTrue(fired);

This survives garbage collection since you don't have to retain a reference to anything.

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And you can also cancel it by keeping a reference to the event and setting if you decide you don't want the action to run later. –  Chris Patterson Oct 14 '09 at 21:46
    
You should not use the thread pool for longer tasks, particularly things that are waiting. producer/consumer would be better, or use a timer. :-) –  Samuel Neff Oct 14 '09 at 21:55
    
@Samuel Neff - Actually, RegisterWaitForSingleObject is a great fit here. The threadpool has one waiting thread for each 63 actions registered this way. See: msmvps.com/blogs/luisabreu/archive/2009/06/02/… –  Ohad Schneider Mar 6 '11 at 14:33
    
@ohadsc, good point, thanks for sharing, but still, this doesn't answer the original question which is how to have a timer trigger a lambda expression.. –  Samuel Neff Mar 7 '11 at 5:12
    
@Samuel Neff: Indeed, no timer per se is used here, but it does answer the requirement in the title - "Best way to call a single operation at some time in the future". Personally I like it because you only have to dispose of the manual reset event, which you could share among all RegisterWaitForSingleObject calls. Compare that to the timer approach, where you have to dispose of it each time. See: blogs.msdn.com/b/morgan/archive/2008/12/18/… –  Ohad Schneider Mar 7 '11 at 8:59
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You could just wrap the timer class...

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MyTimer.Create(
            () => { Console.WriteLine("hello"); },
            5000);
        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
        Console.Read();
    }
}
public class MyTimer
{
    private MyTimer() { }
    private Timer _timer;
    private ManualResetEvent _mre;

    public static void Create(Action action, int dueTime)
    {
        var timer = new MyTimer();
        timer._mre = new ManualResetEvent(false);

        timer._timer = new Timer(
            (x) =>
            {
                action();
                timer._mre.Set();
            },
            null,
            dueTime,
            Timeout.Infinite
            );

        new Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>
        {
            timer._mre.WaitOne();
            timer._timer.Dispose();
        })).Start();
    }
}
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The timer object probably implements a destructor. You can easily verify this in documentation or in the reflector.

If this is true, you shouldn't worry about it. Unless this piece of code gets called many times, in which case you should strive for deterministic deallocation of timers, meaning you would hold an array of timers, for example.

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