Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a question related to the usage of the custom message-processors as Global vs local.

I have been defining all the custom transformers at global level and refered them in the mule flows.

What is difference in the scope of the object defined inside a flow versus one declared as global and referred in flow?

Is it going to be impact on the memory if a message processor is defined as global instead of inside flow?

Apart from reusability is there any benifit from defining the processors as global?

Ex:  
Global Way of defining: 

<custom-transformer name="mycustom" class="org.MyClass" />  
<flow name="myflow">
    ...
    ...
    <transformer ref="mycustom" />
    ...
    ...
</flow>


Local Way of defining:
<flow name="myflow">
    ...
    ...
    <custom-transformer name="mycustom" class="org.MyClass" />
    ...
    ...
</flow>

This information would be helpful in designing an optimal solution in terms of memory and code maintainability.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Locally defined transformers are declared as different beans in the registry so there is definitively a cost in declaring them locally again and again.

Thus prefer declaring similar transformers (and components, message processors...) globally.

share|improve this answer
    
What if a component is used only once. Does it make a difference in terms of memory of performance if I declare it Globally instead of Locally? – user1760178 Mar 29 '13 at 19:45
1  
Nope, it doesn't make a difference: in both cases this single component will end-up as a singleton in the registry. – David Dossot Mar 29 '13 at 19:59
    
Thank you @David. – user1760178 Apr 1 '13 at 13:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.