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I can use this regex :

^(?!^(PRN|AUX|CLOCK\$|NUL|CON|COM\d|LPT\d|\..*)(\..+)?$)[^\x00-\x1f\\?*:\"";|/]+$

to detect invalid Windows file names in VBscript, and reject them before a save. I would like to add an additional service to my users by automatically replacing any invalid characters (or succession thereof) with a standard character, like an underscore "_".

Therefore, I need to come up with another pattern, since to my knowledge VBscript only offers a method that replaces if the pattern matches :

with getRGX()
    .ignoreCase = TRUE
    .global = TRUE
    .pattern = < inputPattern >
    < outputCleanfileName > = .Replace( < inputDirtyFileName >, < "_" > )
end with

The best I've managed to come up with so far is the following :

((PRN|AUX|CLOCK\$|NUL|CON|COM\d|LPT\d|\..*)(\..+)?)?[\\?*:\"";|/]+

Unfortunately, it messes with the extensions :

INPUT    = COM1:aAZB?":a|a|a/.txt?
MATCH    = COM1:?"||/.txt?
EXPECTED = COM1:?"||/?

I apologize in advance if I'm missing something obvious, and thanks for any help provided.

share|improve this question
    
I guess I could go with something simpler till I find the correct inverted reged. Something like this seems to suit my needs for now : stackoverflow.com/questions/3885964/… If anyone had the proper "inverted" regex however, I'd be a taker. Thanks again. –  Madscripter Mar 28 '13 at 17:31
    
I may be misunderstanding the question. Are you trying to select each invalid character individually, or are you trying to select the whole file name if it is invalid? My answer solves the latter. –  Sergiu Toarca Mar 28 '13 at 17:39
    
First, thank you for looking into this. I just had a look at your suggestion, and it seems that I've made myself misunderstood. Perhaps should I edit my initial question, but I would like to replace any characters (or groups of chars) detected as invalid by the pattern (hence, that matches it) with something valid, leaving the valid characters (or group of chars) as they are (not matching). Hopefully, this cleared up the confusion. In my example above, the expected match should be : COM1:?"||/? –  Madscripter Mar 28 '13 at 17:46
    
I see, I'll edit my answer. Note though, that the expected value in your answer is incorrect. According to the first regex, COM1 is invalid only if it's the entire file name. So the expected matches should be :?"||/?. –  Sergiu Toarca Mar 28 '13 at 17:50
    
You are correct. I guess I have not been as thorough as I initially thought with my testing. –  Madscripter Mar 28 '13 at 17:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think this regex does what you want:

(?:^(PRN|AUX|CLOCK\$|NUL|CON|COM\d|LPT\d|\..*)(?:\.(?=.)|$)|(?:([\x00-\x1f\\?*:\"";|/])))

You can see how it works on Debuggex. The idea is to "invert" each portion of the rejecting regex.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. I had the "inverting each portion of the rejecting regex" idea, but still missed some parts of it. Thank you again. Answer provided. –  Madscripter Mar 28 '13 at 18:03

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