Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I dabbled with Assembly (NASM flavor) a bit a while back and I'm trying to learn it again. (I know I can count the string length first, but it's an excercise)

Anyways, I wrote this code to print out a null terminated string to stdout using sys_write. (I plan to generalize it, I'm just testing right now.)

It seems like it will work because if I increment i before calling sys_write then it prints 'e', but if I increment it afterwards, then it prints 'H' as expected. However, as soon as it encounters: jne print_loop, it produces a run-time error with the error code of -1. I tried several jump instructions and they all crash, but as soon as I remove the jump the program runs without any errors.

Ideone

SECTION .data
    hello:
        db "Hello World!/n",0

SECTION .bss
    i: 
        resb 1

SECTION .text
    global _start

    _start:
        mov ecx, hello
        call print

        mov eax, 1
        mov ebx, 0
        int 80h

    print:
        mov eax, 4
        mov ebx, 1
        mov edx, 1

        print_loop:
            push eax
            mov eax, [i]
            lea ecx, [ecx+eax]
            pop eax

            int 80h
            inc dword [i]
            cmp ecx, 0  
            jne print_loop ; if I comment this out, it runs without error.

        ret

Here is the fixed version:

%macro print_ 1
    mov eax, 4
    mov ebx, 1
    mov ecx, %1

    call print
%endmacro

%macro exit_ 1
    mov eax, 1
    mov ebx, %1
    int 80h
%endmacro

SECTION .data
    hello:
        db "Hello World!/n",0

SECTION .bss
    i: 
        resb 1

SECTION .text
    global _start

    _start:
        print_ hello
        exit_ 0

    ;print code called by print_ macro
    print:
        push ecx
        count:
            inc ecx
            cmp byte [ecx], 0
            jne count

        mov edx, ecx
        pop ecx
        sub edx, ecx

        int 80h
    ret
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There are several problems with the code:

i: 
    resb 1

Here you reserve space for one byte, but in the print function you treat i as a dword.

int 80h

This will trash the old value of eax, since eax holds the return value of the syscall. So you need to reload eax with the syscall number (4) at each iteration.

lea ecx, [ecx+eax]

Here you overwrite the base address of the string with &string[i], which will result in incorrect addresses on subsequent iterations since you don't preserve the original ecx value.

cmp ecx, 0

I'm not sure why you expect ecx to be 0. It would make more sense to load the byte stored at [ecx] and compare that against zero (before the syscall).

share|improve this answer
    
In the original code I had planned to use sys_write one byte at a time, it was to be zero after incrementing over the whole string. Also note that lea ecx, [hello+eax] was the original. Sorry for the rush, I have to leave. –  GRAYgoose124 Mar 28 '13 at 18:15
    
My point about comparing ecx to 0 was that it doesn't make sense to compare the address against zero to find the end of a string. It's the value stored at that address that should be compared against 0. –  Michael Mar 28 '13 at 18:23
    
Well here was my plan, I would make ecx the pointer to the first letter by assigning it hello. Then I would assign it ecx+1 every time to increment it, I was using eax because I don't really know what format it wants the offset in. I didn't know int 80h clobbered the registers though, I assumed it backed them up to the stack beforehand. –  GRAYgoose124 Mar 28 '13 at 18:34
    
Also, it was probably just a typo where I meant to put cmp [ecx], 0. As the other answerer pointed out, I shouldn't be asking questions here just because I don't have access to the resources to do it myself. The biggest difficulty of Assembly is knowing all the nooks and crannies. –  GRAYgoose124 Mar 28 '13 at 18:41

Several problems.

First:

  mov eax, [i]

i is a byte variable, but the instruction reads 4 bytes from its location.

  inc dword [i]

i is a byte variable, but the instruction increments a 4-byte value at its location.

Second (I think):

What is going to be in ecx after this instruction

  lea ecx, [ecx+eax]

executes the 2nd time? Is it still going to be a valid address pointing into hello?

And btw, learn to use the debugger. It's about the time.

share|improve this answer
    
I know perfectly well how to use a debugger, but I am doing this entirely on Ideone.com. I am at school and do not have access to a Linux machine. Also, lea ecx, [ecx+eax] was not the original function, it used to be lea ecx, [hello+eax] and I changed it without any seemingly side effects. It still crashed with lea ecx, [hello+eax] I put inc dword [i] because I was unsure if it mattered, since it would only touch the lowest byte anyways. –  GRAYgoose124 Mar 28 '13 at 18:12
    
So, just because you don't have access to a machine with a debugger, you want us to debug your stuff for you? And it's urgent, I suppose? –  Alexey Frunze Mar 28 '13 at 18:20
    
Btw, even if value-wise only one byte is modified, the CPU checks that it can access the entire dword. So, you shouldn't do that sort of thing unless running a risk of crashing is OK with you. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 28 '13 at 18:29
    
Sorry for being short, I was rushed. You're completely right, I was impatient. Anyways, in lea ecx, [ecx+eax] eax was supposed to be one. I was using eax because I didn't know what exactly the offset had to be in terms of storage type. I was expecting it to load ecx+1 into ecx and then it would load ecx+1+1 (where the first +1 was the result of the previous operation) I'm not really sure what I was doing. Thanks for the help. –  GRAYgoose124 Mar 28 '13 at 18:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.