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I am trying to obtain a list of all permutations of repeatable items using a 1-0 knapsack dynamic programming algorithm. I have written a python program below which find the first set for each item, but I am a little confused about finding the rest.

The program adds each of the first 2 elements in each tuple to a set. The set is then converted into a list and finally sorted in descending order.

#!/usr/bin/python

gMax = 48
dims = [
  (40, 24, 10),
  (40, 24, 20),
  (24, 20, 20),
  (24, 20, 30),
  (20, 12, 10),
  (20, 12, 20),
  (20, 12, 30)
]

s = set()
for dim in dims:
  for i in range(2):
    d = dim[i]
    if d not in s:
      s.add(d)
l = sorted(list(s), reverse=True)
print 'Set:',l,'\nMax:',gMax
i, types, done, lenL = 0, [], False, len(l)
while not done:
  lMax, t, j = 0, [], i
  while lMax < gMax and j < lenL:
    greed = l[j]
    if lMax + greed <= gMax:
      t.append(greed)
      lMax += greed
    else:
      j+=1
  types.append(t)
  i+=1
  if i >= lenL: done = True
print 'Permutations:',types

Actual Output:

Set: [40, 24, 20, 12] 
Max: 48
Permutations: [[40], [24, 24], [20, 20], [12, 12, 12, 12]]

Goal Output:

Set: [40, 24, 20, 12] 
Max: 48
Permutations: [
  [40],
  [24, 24], [24, 20], [24, 12, 12], [24, 12], [24]
  [20, 20], [20, 12, 12], [20, 12], [20]
  [12, 12, 12, 12], [12, 12, 12], [12, 12, 12], [12, 12], [12]
]

Edit: Well, I figured it out... (really inefficient though).

Code:

#!/usr/bin/python
# Filename: strips.py

from itertools import chain, combinations
import datetime as dt

def weight(A):
  return sum(x for x in A)

def powerset(L):
  return chain.from_iterable(combinations(L,r) for r in xrange(len(L)+1))

def uniqueList(L):
  s = set()
  for i in L:
    for j in i:
      if j not in s: s.add(j)
  return list(s)

def duplicate(L, M):
  l = list()
  for e in L:
    max = 0
    while max + e <= M:
      l.append(e)
      max += e
  return sorted(l, reverse=True)

def strips(L, M):
  u = uniqueList(L)
  d = duplicate(u, M)
  return sorted(list(set([x for x in powerset(d) if 0 < weight(x) <= M])), reverse=True)

if __name__ == '__main__':
  max = 63
  items = [(16, 20), (16, 24), (20, 26), (20, 20), (24, 12)]
  timestart = dt.datetime.now()
  strips = strips(items, max)
  timestop = dt.datetime.now()
  print 'Execution Time:',(timestop-timestart)
  print 'Number of Results:',len(strips)
  for strip in strips:
    val = 0
    for s in strip:
      val += s
      print s,
    print '=',val

Output (Added time):

Execution Time: 0:00:00.030264
Number of Results: 51
26 26 = 52
26 24 12 = 62
26 24 = 50
26 20 16 = 62
26 20 12 = 58
26 20 = 46
26 16 16 = 58
26 16 12 = 54
26 16 = 42
26 12 12 12 = 62
26 12 12 = 50
26 12 = 38
26 = 26
24 24 12 = 60
24 24 = 48
24 20 16 = 60
24 20 12 = 56
24 20 = 44
24 16 16 = 56
24 16 12 = 52
24 16 = 40
24 12 12 12 = 60
24 12 12 = 48
24 12 = 36
24 = 24
20 20 20 = 60
20 20 16 = 56
20 20 12 = 52
20 20 = 40
20 16 16 = 52
20 16 12 12 = 60
20 16 12 = 48
20 16 = 36
20 12 12 12 = 56
20 12 12 = 44
20 12 = 32
20 = 20
16 16 16 12 = 60
16 16 16 = 48
16 16 12 12 = 56
16 16 12 = 44
16 16 = 32
16 12 12 12 = 52
16 12 12 = 40
16 12 = 28
16 = 16
12 12 12 12 12 = 60
12 12 12 12 = 48
12 12 12 = 36
12 12 = 24
12 = 12
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by mbeckish, phs, codesparkle, Peter DeWeese, RolandoMySQLDBA Mar 29 '13 at 1:17

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What if you add the extra copies of each value to the set first, then just do a normal knapsack solution on the set? In your example, make Set : [40, 24, 24, 20, 20, 12, 12, 12, 12]. –  mbeckish Mar 28 '13 at 20:11
    
Sets do not allow duplicates, that's why they are sets :) I know I am using a list, but all I should need is one copy. I am not looking for a hack, I need to make this as clean as possible. –  Mr. Polywhirl Mar 28 '13 at 21:04
    
I thought it might end up cleaner to precompute the number of copies each value would require, and then just apply a generic algorithm to find the solutions from the multiset, rather than having to worry about keeping track of the copies in the guts of your knapsack algorithm. To each his own. –  mbeckish Mar 28 '13 at 22:02
    
@mbeckish, I considered your suggestion and implemented it. Thanks. –  Mr. Polywhirl Mar 29 '13 at 22:38
1  
Considering you've got a solution and you're now asking to about efficiency, I suggest you post your question on Code Review. –  p.s.w.g Mar 29 '13 at 22:57