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I was wondering if someone here have a good implementation of the Sieve of Atkin that they would like to share.

I am trying to implement it, but can't quite wrap my head around it. Here is what I have so far.

public class Atkin : IEnumerable<ulong>
{
    private readonly List<ulong> primes;
    private readonly ulong limit;

    public Atkin(ulong limit)
    {
        this.limit = limit;
        primes = new List<ulong>();
    }

    private void FindPrimes()
    {
        var isPrime = new bool[limit + 1];
        var sqrt = Math.Sqrt(limit);

        for (ulong x = 1; x <= sqrt; x++)
            for (ulong y = 1; y <= sqrt; y++)
            {
                var n = 4*x*x + y*y;
                if (n <= limit && (n % 12 == 1 || n % 12 == 5))
                    isPrime[n] ^= true;

                n = 3*x*x + y*y;
                if (n <= limit && n % 12 == 7)
                    isPrime[n] ^= true;

                n = 3*x*x - y*y;
                if (x > y && n <= limit && n % 12 == 11)
                    isPrime[n] ^= true;
            }

        for (ulong n = 5; n <= sqrt; n++)
            if (isPrime[n])
                for (ulong k = n*n; k <= limit; k *= k)
                    isPrime[k] = false;

        primes.Add(2);
        primes.Add(3);
        for (ulong n = 5; n <= limit; n++)
            if (isPrime[n])
                primes.Add(n);
    }


    public IEnumerator<ulong> GetEnumerator()
    {
        if (!primes.Any())
            FindPrimes();


        foreach (var p in primes)
            yield return p;
    }


    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }
}

I have pretty much just tried to "translate" the pseudocode listed at Wikipedia, but it isn't working correctly. So either I have misunderstood something or just done something wrong. Or most likely both...

Have a list of the first 500 primes which I use as a test and my implementation fails at number 40(or 41?).

Values differ at index [40]
Expected: 179
But was: 175

Are you able to find my mistake, do you have an implementation laying around that you could share, or both?


The exact test I am using looks like this:

public abstract class AtkinTests
{
    [Test]
    public void GetEnumerator_FirstFiveHundredNumbers_AreCorrect()
    {
        var sequence = new Atkin(2000000);
        var actual = sequence.Take(500).ToArray();
        var expected = First500;

        CollectionAssert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
    }

    private static readonly ulong[] First500 = new ulong[]
        {
            2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, ...
        };
}
share|improve this question
    
I've made an implementation that is a little faster than yours and a lot faster on a multi-core, see alicebobandmallory.com/articles/2010/01/14/… –  Jonas Elfström Jan 15 '10 at 9:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This code:

for (ulong k = n*n; k <= limit; k *= k)
  isPrime[k] = false;

doesn't seem to be a faithful translation of this pseudocode:

is_prime(k) ← false, k ∈ {n², 2n², 3n², ..., limit}

Your code looks like it will run for n * n, n ^ 4, n ^ 8, etc. i.e. squaring each time instead of adding n-squared each time. Try this:

ulong nSquared = n * n;
for (ulong k = nSquared; k <= limit; k += nSquared)
  isPrime[k] = false;
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! That seems to have been it actually... and I was in fact a bit unsure about that exact part, just didn't know how to write it correctly :P –  Svish Oct 14 '09 at 21:43

Here's another implementation. It uses BitArray to save memory. The Parallel.For needs .NET Framework 4.

static List<int> FindPrimesBySieveOfAtkins(int max)
{
//  var isPrime = new BitArray((int)max+1, false); 
//  Can't use BitArray because of threading issues.
    var isPrime = new bool[max + 1];
    var sqrt = (int)Math.Sqrt(max);

    Parallel.For(1, sqrt, x =>
    {
        var xx = x * x;
        for (int y = 1; y <= sqrt; y++)
        {
            var yy = y * y;
            var n = 4 * xx + yy;
            if (n <= max && (n % 12 == 1 || n % 12 == 5))
                isPrime[n] ^= true;

            n = 3 * xx + yy;
            if (n <= max && n % 12 == 7)
                isPrime[n] ^= true;

            n = 3 * xx - yy;
            if (x > y && n <= max && n % 12 == 11)
                isPrime[n] ^= true;
        }
    });

    var primes = new List<int>() { 2, 3 };
    for (int n = 5; n <= sqrt; n++)
    {
        if (isPrime[n])
        {
            primes.Add(n);
            int nn = n * n;
            for (int k = nn; k <= max; k += nn)
                isPrime[k] = false;
        }
    }

    for (int n = sqrt + 1; n <= max; n++)
        if (isPrime[n])
            primes.Add(n);

    return primes;
}
share|improve this answer
    
At first glance this looks really cool and it is indeed quite fast, but it seems as though it doesn't work properly. Try FindPrimesBySieveOfAtkins(1000000).Count and you will get different values around the 78500 mark. Presumably this is due to the parallelism, as I'm sure you can see. –  Tom Chantler Dec 14 '10 at 2:54
1  
You are absolutely right. I had my worries about the non thread safe characteristics of BitArray but I thought that the isPrime[n] ^= true; was an atomic operation and that it didn't matter in what order bit bits was flipped would make it possible to use anyway. Not so. Changed it to a boolean array and that seems to rock the boat but of course at a much bigger memory cost. –  Jonas Elfström Dec 14 '10 at 8:46
    
Would it be possible to use the bit array if you used the msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… class or something? –  Svish Nov 17 '11 at 9:10
    
Can't say I see how. –  Jonas Elfström Nov 17 '11 at 21:57
    
isPrime[n] ^= true; is not threadsafe. Easy way of checking this(but you could also do this with bool XOR): int i = 0; Parallel.For(0, 10000, (x) => { i += 1; }); Console.WriteLine(i); –  oddbear Dec 18 at 11:48

The last answer by Aaron Mugatroyd as from the translated Python source for a Sieve of Atkin (SoA) isn't too bad, but it can be improved in several respects as it misses some important optimizations, as follows:

  1. His answer doesn't use the full modulo 60 original Atkin and Bernstein version of the Sieve but rather a slightly improved variation of the pseudo code from the Wikipedia article so uses about a factor of 0.36 of the numerical sieve range combined toggle/cull operations; my code below uses the reasonably efficient non-page segment pseudo code as per my comments in an answer commenting on the Sieve of Atkin which uses a factor of about 0.26 times the numerical range to reduce the amount of work done to about a factor of about two sevenths.

  2. His code reduces the buffer size by only having odd number representations, whereas my code further bit packs to eliminate any representation of the numbers divisible by three and five as well as those divisible by two implied by "odds-only"; this reduces the memory requirement by a further factor of almost half (to 8/15) and helps make better use of the CPU caches for a further increase in speed due to reduced average memory access time.

  3. My code counts the number of primes using a fast Look Up Table (LUT) pop count technique to take almost no time to count as compared to the approximately one second using the bit-by-bit technique he uses; however, in this sample code even that small time is taken out of the timed portion of the code.

  4. Finally, my code optimizes the bit manipulation operations for a minimum of code per inner loop. For instance, it does not use continual right shift by one to produce the odd representation index and in fact little bit shifting at all by writing all of the inner loops as constant modulo (equals bit position) operations. As well, Aaron's translated code is quite inefficient in operations as for instance in prime square free culling it adds the square of the prime to the index then checks for an odd result rather than just adding two times the square so as not to require the check; then it makes even the check redundant by shifting the number right by one (dividing by two) before doing the cull operation in the inner loop, just as it does for all the loops. This inefficient code won't make much of a difference in execution time for large ranges using this "large sieve buffer array" technique, as most of the time per operation is used in RAM memory access (about 37 CPU clock cycles or more for a range of one billion), but will make the execution time much slower than it needs to be for smaller ranges which fit into the CPU caches; in other words it sets a too high lowest limit in execution speed per operation.

The code is as follows:

//Sieve of Atkin based on full non page segmented modulo 60 implementation...

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace NonPagedSoA {
  //implements the non-paged Sieve of Atkin (full modulo 60 version)...
  class SoA : IEnumerable<ulong> {
    private ushort[] buf = null;
    private long cnt = 0;
    private long opcnt = 0;
    private static byte[] modPRMS = { 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 59, 61 };
    private static ushort[] modLUT;
    private static byte[] cntLUT;
    //initialize the private LUT's...
    static SoA() {
      modLUT = new ushort[60];
      for (int i = 0, m = 0; i < modLUT.Length; ++i) {
        if ((i & 1) != 0 || (i + 7) % 3 == 0 || (i + 7) % 5 == 0) modLUT[i] = 0;
        else modLUT[i] = (ushort)(1 << (m++));
      }
      cntLUT = new byte[65536];
      for (int i = 0; i < cntLUT.Length; ++i) {
        var c = 0;
        for (int j = i; j > 0; j >>= 1) c += j & 1;
        cntLUT[i] = (byte)c;
      }
    }
    //initialization and all the work producing the prime bit array done in the constructor...
    public SoA(ulong range) {
      this.opcnt = 0;
      if (range < 7) {
        if (range > 1) {
          cnt = 1;
          if (range > 2) this.cnt += (long)(range - 1) / 2;
        }
        this.buf = new ushort[0];
      }
      else {
        this.cnt = 3;
        var nrng = range - 7; var lmtw = nrng / 60;
        //initialize sufficient wheels to non-prime
        this.buf = new ushort[lmtw + 1];

        //Put in candidate primes:
        //for the 4 * x ^ 2 + y ^ 2 quadratic solution toggles - all x odd y...
        ulong n = 6; // equivalent to 13 - 7 = 6...
        for (uint x = 1, y = 3; n <= nrng; n += (x << 3) + 4, ++x, y = 1) {
          var cb = n; if (x <= 1) n -= 8; //cancel the effect of skipping the first one...
          for (uint i = 0; i < 15 && cb <= range; cb += (y << 2) + 4, y += 2, ++i) {
            var cbd = cb / 60; var cm = modLUT[cb % 60];
            if (cm != 0)
              for (uint c = (uint)cbd, my = y + 15; c < buf.Length; c += my, my += 30) {
                buf[c] ^= cm; // ++this.opcnt;
              }
          }
        }
        //for the 3 * x ^ 2 + y ^ 2 quadratic solution toggles - x odd y even...
        n = 0; // equivalent to 7 - 7 = 0...
        for (uint x = 1, y = 2; n <= nrng; n += ((x + x + x) << 2) + 12, x += 2, y = 2) {
          var cb = n;
          for (var i = 0; i < 15 && cb <= range; cb += (y << 2) + 4, y += 2, ++i) {
            var cbd = cb / 60; var cm = modLUT[cb % 60];
            if (cm != 0)
              for (uint c = (uint)cbd, my = y + 15; c < buf.Length; c += my, my += 30) {
                buf[c] ^= cm; // ++this.opcnt;
              }
          }
        }
        //for the 3 * x ^ 2 - y ^ 2 quadratic solution toggles all x and opposite y = x - 1...
        n = 4; // equivalent to 11 - 7 = 4...
        for (uint x = 2, y = x - 1; n <= nrng; n += (ulong)(x << 2) + 4, y = x, ++x) {
          var cb = n; int i = 0;
          for ( ; y > 1 && i < 15 && cb <= nrng; cb += (ulong)(y << 2) - 4, y -= 2, ++i) {
            var cbd = cb / 60; var cm = modLUT[cb % 60];
            if (cm != 0) {
              uint c = (uint)cbd, my = y;
              for ( ; my >= 30 && c < buf.Length; c += my - 15, my -= 30) {
                buf[c] ^= cm; // ++this.opcnt;
              }
              if (my > 0 && c < buf.Length) { buf[c] ^= cm; /* ++this.opcnt; */ }
            }
          }
          if (y == 1 && i < 15) {
            var cbd = cb / 60; var cm = modLUT[cb % 60];
            if ((cm & 0x4822) != 0 && cbd < (ulong)buf.Length) { buf[cbd] ^= cm; /* ++this.opcnt; */ }
          }
        }

        //Eliminate squares of base primes, only for those on the wheel:
        for (uint i = 0, w = 0, pd = 0, pn = 0, msk = 1; w < this.buf.Length ; ++i) {
          uint p = pd + modPRMS[pn];
          ulong sqr = p * p;
          if (sqr > range) break;
          if ((this.buf[w] & msk) != 0) { //found base prime, square free it...
            ulong s = sqr - 7;
            for (int j = 0; s <= nrng && j < modPRMS.Length; s = sqr * modPRMS[j] - 7, ++j) {
              var cd = s / 60; var cm = (ushort)(modLUT[s % 60] ^ 0xFFFF);
              //may need ulong loop index for ranges larger than two billion
              //but buf length only good to about 2^31 * 60 = 120 million anyway,
              //even with large array setting and half that with 32-bit...
              for (ulong c = cd; c < (ulong)this.buf.Length; c += sqr) {
                this.buf[c] &= cm; // ++this.opcnt;
              }
            }
          }
          if (msk >= 0x8000) { msk = 1; pn = 0; ++w; pd += 60; }
          else { msk <<= 1; ++pn; }
        }

        //clear any overflow primes in the excess space in the last wheel/word:
        var ndx = nrng % 60; //clear any primes beyond the range
        for (; modLUT[ndx] == 0; --ndx) ;
        this.buf[lmtw] &= (ushort)((modLUT[ndx] << 1) - 1);
      }
    }

    //uses a fast pop count Look Up Table to return the total number of primes...
    public long Count {
      get {
        long cnt = this.cnt;
        for (int i = 0; i < this.buf.Length; ++i) cnt += cntLUT[this.buf[i]];
        return cnt;
      }
    }

    //returns the number of toggle/cull operations used to sieve the prime bit array...
    public long Ops {
      get {
        return this.opcnt;
      }
    }

    //generate the enumeration of primes...
    public IEnumerator<ulong> GetEnumerator() {
      yield return 2; yield return 3; yield return 5;
      ulong pd = 0;
      for (uint i = 0, w = 0, pn = 0, msk = 1; w < this.buf.Length; ++i) {
        if ((this.buf[w] & msk) != 0) //found a prime bit...
          yield return pd + modPRMS[pn]; //add it to the list
        if (msk >= 0x8000) { msk = 1; pn = 0; ++w; pd += 60; }
        else { msk <<= 1; ++pn; }
      }
    }

    //required for the above enumeration...
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
      return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
  }

  class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
      Console.WriteLine("This program calculates primes by a simple full version of the Sieve of Atkin.\r\n");

      const ulong n = 1000000000;

      var elpsd = -DateTime.Now.Ticks;

      var gen = new SoA(n);

      elpsd += DateTime.Now.Ticks;

      Console.WriteLine("{0} primes found to {1} using {2} operations in {3} milliseconds.", gen.Count, n, gen.Ops, elpsd / 10000);

      //Output prime list for testing...
      //Console.WriteLine();
      //foreach (var p in gen) {
      //  Console.Write(p + " ");
      //}
      //Console.WriteLine();

//Test options showing what one can do with the enumeration, although more slowly...
//      Console.WriteLine("\r\nThere are {0} primes with the last one {1} and the sum {2}.",gen.Count(),gen.Last(),gen.Sum(x => (long)x));

      Console.Write("\r\nPress any key to exit:");
      Console.ReadKey(true);
      Console.WriteLine();
    }
  }
}

This code runs about twice as fast as Aaron's code (about 2.7 seconds using 64-bit or 32-bit mode on an i7-2700K (3.5 GHz) with the buffer about 16.5 Megabytes and about 0.258 billion combined toggle/prime square free cull operations (which can be shown by uncommenting the "++this.opcnt" statements) for a sieve range of one billion, as compared to 5.4/6.2 seconds (32-bit/64-bit) for his code without the count time and almost twice the memory use using about 0.359 billion combined toggle/cull operations for sieving up to one billion.

Although it is faster than his most optimized naive odds-only implementation of the non-paged Sieve of Eratosthenes (SoE), that does not make the Sieve of Atkin faster than the Sieve of Eratosthenes, as if one applies similar techniques as used in the above SoA implementation to the SoE plus uses maximal wheel factorization, the SoE will about the same speed as this.

Analysis: Although the number of operations for the fully optimized SoE are about the same as the number of operations for the SoA for a sieve range of one billion, the main bottleneck for these non-paged implementations is memory access once the sieve buffer size exceeds the CPU cache sizes (32 KiloBytes L1 cache at one clock cycle access, 256 Kilobytes L2 cache at about four clock cycles access time and 8 Megabytes L3 cache at about 20 clock cycles access time for my i7), after which memory access can exceed a hundred clock cycles.

Now both have a factor of about eight improvement in memory access speeds when one adapts the algorithms to page segmentation so one can sieve ranges that would not otherwise fit into available memory. However, the SoE continues to gain over the SoA as the sieve range starts to get very large due to difficulties in implementing the "primes square free" part of the algorithm due to the huge strides in culling scans that quickly grow to many hundreds of times the size of the page buffers. As well, and perhaps more serious, it gets very memory and/or computationally intensive to compute the new start point for each value of 'x' as to the value of 'y' at the lowest representation of each page buffer for a further quite large loss in efficiency of the paged SoA comparaed to the SoE as the range grows.

EDIT_ADD: The odds-only SoE as used by Aaron Murgatroyd uses about 1.026 billion cull operations for a sieve range of one billion so about four times as many operations as the SoA and thus should run about four times slower, but the SoA even as implemented here has a more complex inner loop and especially due to a much higher proportion of the odds-only SoE culls have a much shorter stride in the culling scans than the strides of the SoA the naive odds-only SoE has much better average memory access times in spite of the sieve buffer greatly exceeding the CPU cache sizes (better use of cache associativity). This explains why the above SoA is only about twice as fast as the odds-only SoE even though it would theoretically seem to be doing only one quarter of the work.

If one were to use a similar algorithm using constant modulo inner loops as for the above SoA and implemented the same 2/3/5 wheel factorization, the SoE would reduce the number of cull operations to about 0.405 billion operations so only about 50% more operations than the SoA and would theoretically run just slightly slower than the SoA, but may run at about the same speed due to the cull strides still being a little smaller than for the SoA on the average for this "naive" large memory buffer use. Increasing the wheel factorization to the 2/3/5/7 wheel means the SoE cull operations are reduced to about 0.314 for a cull range of one billion and may make that version of the SoE run about the same speed for this algorithm.

Further use of wheel factorization can be made by pre-culling the sieve array (copying in a pattern) for the 2/3/5/7/11/13/17/19 prime factors at almost no cost in execution time to reduce the total number of cull operations to about 0.251 billion for a sieve range of one billion and the SoE will run faster or about the same speed than even this optimized version of the SoA, even for these large memory buffer versions, with the SoE still having much less code complexity than the above.

Thus, it can be seen that the number of operations for the SoE can be greatly reduced from a naive or even odds-only or 2/3/5 wheel factorization version such that the number of operations are about the same as for the SoA while at the same time the time per operation may actually be less due to both less complex inner loops and more efficient memory access. END_EDIT_ADD

EDIT_ADD2: I here add the code for a SoE using a similiar constant modulo/bit position technique for the innermost loops as for the SoA above according to the pseudo code further down the answer as linked above. The code is quite a bit less complex than the above SoA in spite of having high wheel factorization and pre-culling applied such that the total number of cull operations are actually less than the combined toggle/cull operations for the SoA up to a sieving rang of about two billion. The code as follows:

//Sieve of Atkin based on full non page segmented modulo 60 implementation...

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace NonPagedSoA {
  //implements the non-paged Sieve of Atkin (full modulo 60 version)...
  class SoA : IEnumerable<ulong> {
    private ushort[] buf = null;
    private long cnt = 0;
    private long opcnt = 0;
    private static byte[] modPRMS = { 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 59, 61 };
    private static ushort[] modLUT;
    private static byte[] cntLUT;
    //initialize the private LUT's...
    static SoA() {
      modLUT = new ushort[60];
      for (int i = 0, m = 0; i < modLUT.Length; ++i) {
        if ((i & 1) != 0 || (i + 7) % 3 == 0 || (i + 7) % 5 == 0) modLUT[i] = 0;
        else modLUT[i] = (ushort)(1 << (m++));
      }
      cntLUT = new byte[65536];
      for (int i = 0; i < cntLUT.Length; ++i) {
        var c = 0;
        for (int j = i; j > 0; j >>= 1) c += j & 1;
        cntLUT[i] = (byte)c;
      }
    }
    //initialization and all the work producing the prime bit array done in the constructor...
    public SoA(ulong range) {
      this.opcnt = 0;
      if (range < 7) {
        if (range > 1) {
          cnt = 1;
          if (range > 2) this.cnt += (long)(range - 1) / 2;
        }
        this.buf = new ushort[0];
      }
      else {
        this.cnt = 3;
        var nrng = range - 7; var lmtw = nrng / 60;
        //initialize sufficient wheels to non-prime
        this.buf = new ushort[lmtw + 1];

        //Put in candidate primes:
        //for the 4 * x ^ 2 + y ^ 2 quadratic solution toggles - all x odd y...
        ulong n = 6; // equivalent to 13 - 7 = 6...
        for (uint x = 1, y = 3; n <= nrng; n += (x << 3) + 4, ++x, y = 1) {
          var cb = n; if (x <= 1) n -= 8; //cancel the effect of skipping the first one...
          for (uint i = 0; i < 15 && cb <= range; cb += (y << 2) + 4, y += 2, ++i) {
            var cbd = cb / 60; var cm = modLUT[cb % 60];
            if (cm != 0)
              for (uint c = (uint)cbd, my = y + 15; c < buf.Length; c += my, my += 30) {
                buf[c] ^= cm; // ++this.opcnt;
              }
          }
        }
        //for the 3 * x ^ 2 + y ^ 2 quadratic solution toggles - x odd y even...
        n = 0; // equivalent to 7 - 7 = 0...
        for (uint x = 1, y = 2; n <= nrng; n += ((x + x + x) << 2) + 12, x += 2, y = 2) {
          var cb = n;
          for (var i = 0; i < 15 && cb <= range; cb += (y << 2) + 4, y += 2, ++i) {
            var cbd = cb / 60; var cm = modLUT[cb % 60];
            if (cm != 0)
              for (uint c = (uint)cbd, my = y + 15; c < buf.Length; c += my, my += 30) {
                buf[c] ^= cm; // ++this.opcnt;
              }
          }
        }
        //for the 3 * x ^ 2 - y ^ 2 quadratic solution toggles all x and opposite y = x - 1...
        n = 4; // equivalent to 11 - 7 = 4...
        for (uint x = 2, y = x - 1; n <= nrng; n += (ulong)(x << 2) + 4, y = x, ++x) {
          var cb = n; int i = 0;
          for ( ; y > 1 && i < 15 && cb <= nrng; cb += (ulong)(y << 2) - 4, y -= 2, ++i) {
            var cbd = cb / 60; var cm = modLUT[cb % 60];
            if (cm != 0) {
              uint c = (uint)cbd, my = y;
              for ( ; my >= 30 && c < buf.Length; c += my - 15, my -= 30) {
                buf[c] ^= cm; // ++this.opcnt;
              }
              if (my > 0 && c < buf.Length) { buf[c] ^= cm; /* ++this.opcnt; */ }
            }
          }
          if (y == 1 && i < 15) {
            var cbd = cb / 60; var cm = modLUT[cb % 60];
            if ((cm & 0x4822) != 0 && cbd < (ulong)buf.Length) { buf[cbd] ^= cm; /* ++this.opcnt; */ }
          }
        }

        //Eliminate squares of base primes, only for those on the wheel:
        for (uint i = 0, w = 0, pd = 0, pn = 0, msk = 1; w < this.buf.Length ; ++i) {
          uint p = pd + modPRMS[pn];
          ulong sqr = p * p;
          if (sqr > range) break;
          if ((this.buf[w] & msk) != 0) { //found base prime, square free it...
            ulong s = sqr - 7;
            for (int j = 0; s <= nrng && j < modPRMS.Length; s = sqr * modPRMS[j] - 7, ++j) {
              var cd = s / 60; var cm = (ushort)(modLUT[s % 60] ^ 0xFFFF);
              //may need ulong loop index for ranges larger than two billion
              //but buf length only good to about 2^31 * 60 = 120 million anyway,
              //even with large array setting and half that with 32-bit...
              for (ulong c = cd; c < (ulong)this.buf.Length; c += sqr) {
                this.buf[c] &= cm; // ++this.opcnt;
              }
            }
          }
          if (msk >= 0x8000) { msk = 1; pn = 0; ++w; pd += 60; }
          else { msk <<= 1; ++pn; }
        }

        //clear any overflow primes in the excess space in the last wheel/word:
        var ndx = nrng % 60; //clear any primes beyond the range
        for (; modLUT[ndx] == 0; --ndx) ;
        this.buf[lmtw] &= (ushort)((modLUT[ndx] << 1) - 1);
      }
    }

    //uses a fast pop count Look Up Table to return the total number of primes...
    public long Count {
      get {
        long cnt = this.cnt;
        for (int i = 0; i < this.buf.Length; ++i) cnt += cntLUT[this.buf[i]];
        return cnt;
      }
    }

    //returns the number of toggle/cull operations used to sieve the prime bit array...
    public long Ops {
      get {
        return this.opcnt;
      }
    }

    //generate the enumeration of primes...
    public IEnumerator<ulong> GetEnumerator() {
      yield return 2; yield return 3; yield return 5;
      ulong pd = 0;
      for (uint i = 0, w = 0, pn = 0, msk = 1; w < this.buf.Length; ++i) {
        if ((this.buf[w] & msk) != 0) //found a prime bit...
          yield return pd + modPRMS[pn]; //add it to the list
        if (msk >= 0x8000) { msk = 1; pn = 0; ++w; pd += 60; }
        else { msk <<= 1; ++pn; }
      }
    }

    //required for the above enumeration...
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
      return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
  }

  class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
      Console.WriteLine("This program calculates primes by a simple full version of the Sieve of Atkin.\r\n");

      const ulong n = 1000000000;

      var elpsd = -DateTime.Now.Ticks;

      var gen = new SoA(n);

      elpsd += DateTime.Now.Ticks;

      Console.WriteLine("{0} primes found to {1} using {2} operations in {3} milliseconds.", gen.Count, n, gen.Ops, elpsd / 10000);

      //Console.WriteLine();
      //foreach (var p in gen) {
      //  Console.Write(p + " ");
      //}
      //Console.WriteLine();

//      Console.WriteLine("\r\nThere are {0} primes with the last one {1} and the sum {2}.",gen.Count(),gen.Last(),gen.Sum(x => (long)x));

      Console.Write("\r\nPress any key to exit:");
      Console.ReadKey(true);
      Console.WriteLine();
    }
  }
}

Surprisingly, this code actually runs a few percent slower than the above SoA in spite of having slightly less operations; my speculation about the memory access being slower may have been incorrect as while the average strides in toggling are larger than for the culls for the SoE, the typical stride for the SoA may actually be slightly less with more of the strides being over a smaller distance, which may be why the speed is slightly faster. At any rate, using a huge memory buffer isn't the most efficient way to sieve large ranges, with a factor of up to about eight times improvement for the SoE using page segmentation (which also paves the way for multi-processing).

It is in implementing page segmentation and multi-processing that the SoA is really deficient for ranges much above four billion as compared to the SoE as any gains due to the reduced asymptotic complexity of the SoA rapidly get eaten up by page processing overhead factors related to the prime square free processing and calculating the much larger number of page start addresses; alternatively, one overcomes this by storing markers in RAM memory at a huge cost in memory consumption and further inefficiencies in accessing these marker store structures. END_EDIT_ADD2

EDIT_ADD3: Further Analysis: In looking at my SoA code it is easy to see why there are a large number of cases where the typical scan stride is less than the CPU cache sizes. For the 3x- quadratic, the sequences count 'y' down to one over a span with smaller and smaller strides, then jump back to near the same place for the next modulo, which span is less then about the cache sizes for 'x' values of less than about 2000 where the x range is only up to about 18,000 for a sieve range of one billion. While the other quadratic sequences don't have this behaviour but rather cull scan from a start point to the end of the array, as the start point approaches the end of the array for large 'x' values, they then show this same behaviour; thus for about the last few hundred values of 'x' for each of the ranges up to about 16,000 and 18,000. The reductions in memory access time due to being within the CPU caches for this percentage of the total operations explains the relative performance of these sieves

For this version of SoE, the strides are quite large as they six times the sieve base prime value in bytes which starts at 23 and increases to the square root of one billion or about 32,000, and always span the whole sieve buffer array range for quite inefficient RAM memory access times; only the very end values for the very highest values of base prime have the behaviour as for "plus" SoA quadratics and there are very very few of these.

Thus, the SoA enjoys this very slight advantage over even this highly wheel factorized SoE for this one large sieve buffer array type of algorithm, so that if the toggling/culling loop indices were converted to "ulong" from "uint", then are limited in range by the size of available memory to about 60 billion for a 32 bit system (which would be a factor slower anyway in dealing with these many more 64-bit indices operations using 32-bit registers) and about 120 billion for a 64-bit system with the "large memory model" setting enabled given sufficient RAM. Only for 64-bit code would the SoA continue to enjoy this slight few percent advantage up to these limits as there is no cost to 64-bit register operations on a 64-bit processor.

For a page segmented version of the SoA, it suffers the complexities and inefficiencies as compared to a page segmented version of the SoE as previously commented above. END_EDIT_ADD3

In short, the SoA isn't really a practical sieve as compared to the the fully wheel factorized SoE since just as the gain in asymptotic complexity starts to bring it close in performance to the fully optimized SoE, it starts to lose efficiency due to the details of practical implementation as to relative memory access time and page segmentation complexities as well as generally being more complex and difficult to write. In my opinion it is more of an interesting intellectual concept and mental exercise than a practical sieve as compared to the SoE.

Some day I will adapt these techniques to a multi-threaded page segmented Sieve of Eratosthenes to be about as fast in C# as Atkin and Bernstein's "primegen" implementation of the SoA in 'C' and will blow it out of the water for large ranges above about four billion even single threaded, with an extra boost in speed of up to about four when multi-threading on my i7 (eight cores including Hyper Threading).

share|improve this answer

Here is a faster implementation of the Sieve of Atkin, I stole the algorithm from this Python script here (I take no credit for the algorithm):

http://programmingpraxis.com/2010/02/19/sieve-of-atkin-improved/

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace PrimeGenerator
{
    // The block element type for the bit array, 
    // use any unsigned value. WARNING: UInt64 is 
    // slower even on x64 architectures.
    using BitArrayType = System.UInt32;

    // This should never be any bigger than 256 bits - leave as is.
    using BitsPerBlockType = System.Byte;

    // The prime data type, this can be any unsigned value, the limit
    // of this type determines the limit of Prime value that can be
    // found. WARNING: UInt64 is slower even on x64 architectures.
    using PrimeType = System.Int32;

    /// <summary>
    /// Calculates prime number using the Sieve of Eratosthenes method.
    /// </summary>
    /// <example>
    /// <code>
    ///     var lpPrimes = new Eratosthenes(1e7);
    ///     foreach (UInt32 luiPrime in lpPrimes)
    ///         Console.WriteLine(luiPrime);
    /// </example>
    public class Atkin : IEnumerable<PrimeType>
    {
        #region Constants

        /// <summary>
        /// Constant for number of bits per block, calculated based on size of BitArrayType.
        /// </summary>
        const BitsPerBlockType cbBitsPerBlock = sizeof(BitArrayType) * 8;

        #endregion

        #region Protected Locals

        /// <summary>
        /// The limit for the maximum prime value to find.
        /// </summary>
        protected readonly PrimeType mpLimit;

        /// <summary>
        /// The number of primes calculated or null if not calculated yet.
        /// </summary>
        protected PrimeType? mpCount = null;

        /// <summary>
        /// The current bit array where a set bit means
        /// the odd value at that location has been determined
        /// to not be prime.
        /// </summary>
        protected BitArrayType[] mbaOddPrime;

        #endregion

        #region Initialisation

        /// <summary>
        /// Create Sieve of Atkin generator.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="limit">The limit for the maximum prime value to find.</param>
        public Atkin(PrimeType limit)
        {
            // Check limit range
            if (limit > PrimeType.MaxValue - (PrimeType)Math.Sqrt(PrimeType.MaxValue))
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();

            mpLimit = limit;

            FindPrimes();
        }

        #endregion

        #region Private Methods

        /// <summary>
        /// Finds the prime number within range.
        /// </summary>
        private unsafe void FindPrimes()
        {
            // Allocate bit array.
            mbaOddPrime = new BitArrayType[(((mpLimit >> 1) + 1) / cbBitsPerBlock) + 1];

            PrimeType lpYLimit, lpN, lpXX3, lpXX4, lpDXX, lpDN, lpDXX4, lpXX, lpX, lpYY, lpMinY, lpS, lpK;

            fixed (BitArrayType* lpbOddPrime = &mbaOddPrime[0])
            {
                // n = 3x^2 + y^2 section
                lpXX3 = 3;
                for (lpDXX = 0; lpDXX < 12 * SQRT((mpLimit - 1) / 3); lpDXX += 24)
                {
                    lpXX3 += lpDXX;
                    lpYLimit = (12 * SQRT(mpLimit - lpXX3)) - 36;
                    lpN = lpXX3 + 16;

                    for (lpDN = -12; lpDN < lpYLimit + 1; lpDN += 72)
                    {
                        lpN += lpDN;
                        lpbOddPrime[(lpN >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] ^= 
                            (BitArrayType)((BitArrayType)1 << (int)((lpN >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock));
                    }

                    lpN = lpXX3 + 4;
                    for (lpDN = 12; lpDN < lpYLimit + 1; lpDN += 72)
                    {
                        lpN += lpDN;
                        lpbOddPrime[(lpN >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] ^= 
                            (BitArrayType)((BitArrayType)1 << (int)((lpN >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock));
                    }
                }

                //    # n = 4x^2 + y^2 section
                lpXX4 = 0;
                for (lpDXX4 = 4; lpDXX4 < 8 * SQRT((mpLimit - 1) / 4) + 4; lpDXX4 += 8)
                {
                    lpXX4 += lpDXX4;
                    lpN = lpXX4 + 1;

                    if ((lpXX4 % 3) != 0)
                    {
                        for (lpDN = 0; lpDN < (4 * SQRT(mpLimit - lpXX4)) - 3; lpDN += 8)
                        {
                            lpN += lpDN;
                            lpbOddPrime[(lpN >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] ^= 
                                (BitArrayType)((BitArrayType)1 << (int)((lpN >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock));
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        lpYLimit = (12 * SQRT(mpLimit - lpXX4)) - 36;
                        lpN = lpXX4 + 25;

                        for (lpDN = -24; lpDN < lpYLimit + 1; lpDN += 72)
                        {
                            lpN += lpDN;
                            lpbOddPrime[(lpN >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] ^= 
                                (BitArrayType)((BitArrayType)1 << (int)((lpN >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock));
                        }

                        lpN = lpXX4 + 1;
                        for (lpDN = 24; lpDN < lpYLimit + 1; lpDN += 72)
                        {
                            lpN += lpDN;
                            lpbOddPrime[(lpN >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] ^= 
                                (BitArrayType)((BitArrayType)1 << (int)((lpN >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock));
                        }
                    }
                }

                //    # n = 3x^2 - y^2 section
                lpXX = 1;
                for (lpX = 3; lpX < SQRT(mpLimit / 2) + 1; lpX += 2)
                {
                    lpXX += 4 * lpX - 4;
                    lpN = 3 * lpXX;

                    if (lpN > mpLimit)
                    {
                        lpMinY = ((SQRT(lpN - mpLimit) >> 2) << 2);
                        lpYY = lpMinY * lpMinY;
                        lpN -= lpYY;
                        lpS = 4 * lpMinY + 4;
                    }
                    else
                        lpS = 4;

                    for (lpDN = lpS; lpDN < 4 * lpX; lpDN += 8)
                    {
                        lpN -= lpDN;
                        if (lpN <= mpLimit && lpN % 12 == 11)
                            lpbOddPrime[(lpN >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] ^= 
                                (BitArrayType)((BitArrayType)1 << (int)((lpN >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock));
                    }
                }

                // xx = 0
                lpXX = 0;
                for (lpX = 2; lpX < SQRT(mpLimit / 2) + 1; lpX += 2)
                {
                    lpXX += 4*lpX - 4;
                    lpN = 3*lpXX;

                    if (lpN > mpLimit)
                    {
                        lpMinY = ((SQRT(lpN - mpLimit) >> 2) << 2) - 1;
                        lpYY = lpMinY * lpMinY;
                        lpN -= lpYY;
                        lpS = 4*lpMinY + 4;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        lpN -= 1;
                        lpS = 0;
                    }

                    for (lpDN = lpS; lpDN < 4 * lpX; lpDN += 8)
                    {
                        lpN -= lpDN;
                        if (lpN <= mpLimit && lpN % 12 == 11)
                            lpbOddPrime[(lpN>>1) / cbBitsPerBlock] ^= 
                                (BitArrayType)((BitArrayType)1 << (int)((lpN>>1) % cbBitsPerBlock));
                    }
                }

                // # eliminate squares
                for (lpN = 5; lpN < SQRT(mpLimit) + 1; lpN += 2)
                    if ((lpbOddPrime[(lpN >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] & ((BitArrayType)1 << (int)((lpN >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock))) != 0)
                        for (lpK = lpN * lpN; lpK < mpLimit; lpK += lpN * lpN)
                            if ((lpK & 1) == 1)
                                lpbOddPrime[(lpK >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] &=
                                    (BitArrayType)~((BitArrayType)1 << (int)((lpK >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock));
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Calculates the truncated square root for a number.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="value">The value to get the square root for.</param>
        /// <returns>The truncated sqrt of the value.</returns>
        private unsafe PrimeType SQRT(PrimeType value)
        {
            return (PrimeType)Math.Sqrt(value);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets a bit value by index.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="bits">The blocks containing the bits.</param>
        /// <param name="index">The index of the bit.</param>
        /// <returns>True if bit is set, false if cleared.</returns>
        private bool GetBitSafe(BitArrayType[] bits, PrimeType index)
        {
            if ((index & 1) == 1)
                return (bits[(index >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] & ((BitArrayType)1 << (int)((index >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock))) != 0;
            else
                return false;
        }

        #endregion

        #region Public Properties

        /// <summary>
        /// Get the limit for the maximum prime value to find.
        /// </summary>
        public PrimeType Limit
        {
            get
            {
                return mpLimit;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the number of primes found in the range.
        /// </summary>
        public PrimeType Count
        {
            get
            {
                if (!mpCount.HasValue)
                {
                    PrimeType lpCount = 0;
                    foreach (PrimeType liPrime in this) lpCount++;
                    mpCount = lpCount;
                }

                return mpCount.Value;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Determines if a value in range is prime or not.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="test">The value to test for primality.</param>
        /// <returns>True if the value is prime, false otherwise.</returns>
        public bool this[PrimeType test]
        {
            get
            {
                if (test > mpLimit) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
                if (test <= 1) return false;
                if (test == 2) return true;
                if ((test & 1) == 0) return false;
                return !GetBitSafe(mbaOddPrime, test >> 1);
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region Public Methods

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the enumerator for the primes.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>The enumerator of the primes.</returns>
        public IEnumerator<PrimeType> GetEnumerator()
        {
            //    return [2,3] + filter(primes.__getitem__, xrange(5,limit,2))

            // Two & Three always prime.
            yield return 2;
            yield return 3;

            // Start at first block, third MSB (5).
            int liBlock = 0;
            byte lbBit = 2;
            BitArrayType lbaCurrent = mbaOddPrime[0] >> lbBit;

            // For each value in range stepping in incrments of two for odd values.
            for (PrimeType lpN = 5; lpN <= mpLimit; lpN += 2)
            {
                // If current bit not set then value is prime.
                if ((lbaCurrent & 1) == 1)
                    yield return lpN;

                // Move to NSB.
                lbaCurrent >>= 1;

                // Increment bit value. 
                lbBit++;

                // If block is finished.
                if (lbBit == cbBitsPerBlock) 
                {
                    lbBit = 0;
                    lbaCurrent = mbaOddPrime[++liBlock];

                    //// Move to first bit of next block skipping full blocks.
                    while (lbaCurrent == 0)
                    {
                        lpN += ((PrimeType)cbBitsPerBlock) << 1;
                        if (lpN <= mpLimit)
                            lbaCurrent = mbaOddPrime[++liBlock];
                        else
                            break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region IEnumerable<PrimeType> Implementation

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the enumerator for the primes.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns></returns>
        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return GetEnumerator();
        }

        #endregion
    }
}

Its close in speed to my most optimised version of the Sieve of Eratosthenes, but its still slower by about 20%, it can be found here:

http://stackoverflow.com/a/9700790/738380

share|improve this answer
    
processing the large array in chunks as you do for the multi-threaded version of the SoE will likely make this run faster than the equivalent version of your implementation of the SoE as it will reduce cache thrashing of memory access. However, if fairly high factors are eliminated using wheel factorization is applied to your SoE, the SoE will again outrun the SoA for any number range where we would care to wait (ie. less than days) because the number of composite culls of SoE will then be less than the number of toggles by this SoA. –  GordonBGood Oct 11 '13 at 4:36
    
Berstein and Atkin's reference implementation of the SoA as compared to an equivalent implementation of the SoE only used 2,3,5 wheel factorization for the SoE because that is equivalent to the native wheel factorization of SoA but much larger factors such as 2,3,5,7,11,13 are possible for the SoE whereas the SoA does not respond to further wheel factorization. In this way, the number of composite culls by SoE can be reduced to about two thirds of the number of toggles by SoA to likely put the SoE slightly ahead of an even further optimized SoA in spite of the extra complexity. –  GordonBGood Oct 11 '13 at 4:42
    
The question that should be asked is "Why use the Sieve of Atkin rather than the Sieve of Eratosthenes when both are maximally ooptimized?" and the answer is "There is likely no reason at all.", as I develop in this answer. This isn't why your SoA code here is 20% slower, which is more likely to be that this algorithm still hasn't completely removed the need for the modulo for one of the quadratic cases, nor is your implementation of the SoE maximally optimized as I develop in my multi-threading answer. –  GordonBGood Jan 1 at 2:28

Heres mine, it uses a class called CompartmentalisedParallel which allows you to perform parallel for loops but control the number of threads so that the indexes are grouped up. However, due to the threading issues you need to either lock the BitArray each time it is altered or create a separate BitArray for each thread and then XOR them together at the end, the first option was pretty slow because the amount of locks, the second option seemed faster for me!

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace PrimeGenerator
{
    public class Atkin : Primes
    {
        protected BitArray mbaPrimes;
        protected bool mbThreaded = true;

        public Atkin(int limit)
            : this(limit, true)
        {
        }

        public Atkin(int limit, bool threaded)
            : base(limit)
        {
            mbThreaded = threaded;
            if (mbaPrimes == null) FindPrimes();
        }

        public bool Threaded
        {
            get
            {
                return mbThreaded;
            }
        }

        public override IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
        {
            yield return 2;
            yield return 3;
            for (int lsN = 5; lsN <= msLimit; lsN += 2)
                if (mbaPrimes[lsN]) yield return lsN;
        }

        private void FindPrimes()
        {
            mbaPrimes = new BitArray(msLimit + 1, false);

            int lsSQRT = (int)Math.Sqrt(msLimit);

            int[] lsSquares = new int[lsSQRT + 1];
            for (int lsN = 0; lsN <= lsSQRT; lsN++)
                lsSquares[lsN] = lsN * lsN;

            if (Threaded)
            {
                CompartmentalisedParallel.For<BitArray>(
                    1, lsSQRT + 1, new ParallelOptions(),
                    (start, finish) => { return new BitArray(msLimit + 1, false); },
                    (lsX, lsState, lbaLocal) =>
                    {
                        int lsX2 = lsSquares[lsX];

                        for (int lsY = 1; lsY <= lsSQRT; lsY++)
                        {
                            int lsY2 = lsSquares[lsY];

                            int lsN = 4 * lsX2 + lsY2;
                            if (lsN <= msLimit && (lsN % 12 == 1 || lsN % 12 == 5))
                                lbaLocal[lsN] ^= true;

                            lsN -= lsX2;
                            if (lsN <= msLimit && lsN % 12 == 7)
                                lbaLocal[lsN] ^= true;

                            if (lsX > lsY)
                            {
                                lsN -= lsY2 * 2;
                                if (lsN <= msLimit && lsN % 12 == 11)
                                    lbaLocal[lsN] ^= true;
                            }
                        }

                        return lbaLocal;
                    },
                    (lbaResult, start, finish) =>
                    {
                        lock (mbaPrimes) 
                            mbaPrimes.Xor(lbaResult);
                    },
                    -1
                );
            }
            else
            {
                for (int lsX = 1; lsX <= lsSQRT; lsX++)
                {
                    int lsX2 = lsSquares[lsX];

                    for (int lsY = 1; lsY <= lsSQRT; lsY++)
                    {
                        int lsY2 = lsSquares[lsY];

                        int lsN = 4 * lsX2 + lsY2;
                        if (lsN <= msLimit && (lsN % 12 == 1 || lsN % 12 == 5))
                            mbaPrimes[lsN] ^= true;

                        lsN -= lsX2;
                        if (lsN <= msLimit && lsN % 12 == 7)
                            mbaPrimes[lsN] ^= true;

                        if (lsX > lsY)
                        {
                            lsN -= lsY2 * 2;
                            if (lsN <= msLimit && lsN % 12 == 11)
                                mbaPrimes[lsN] ^= true;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

            for (int lsN = 5; lsN < lsSQRT; lsN += 2)
                if (mbaPrimes[lsN])
                {
                    var lsS = lsSquares[lsN];
                    for (int lsK = lsS; lsK <= msLimit; lsK += lsS)
                        mbaPrimes[lsK] = false;
                }
        }
    }
}

And the CompartmentalisedParallel class:

using System;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace PrimeGenerator
{
    public static class CompartmentalisedParallel
    {
        #region Int

        private static int[] CalculateCompartments(int startInclusive, int endExclusive, ref int threads)
        {
            if (threads == 0) threads = 1;
            if (threads == -1) threads = Environment.ProcessorCount;
            if (threads > endExclusive - startInclusive) threads = endExclusive - startInclusive;

            int[] liThreadIndexes = new int[threads + 1];
            liThreadIndexes[threads] = endExclusive - 1;
            int liIndexesPerThread = (endExclusive - startInclusive) / threads;
            for (int liCount = 0; liCount < threads; liCount++)
                liThreadIndexes[liCount] = liCount * liIndexesPerThread;

            return liThreadIndexes;
        }

        public static void For<TLocal>(
            int startInclusive, int endExclusive,
            ParallelOptions parallelOptions,
            Func<int, int, TLocal> localInit,
            Func<int, ParallelLoopState, TLocal, TLocal> body,
            Action<TLocal, int, int> localFinally,
            int threads)
        {
            int[] liThreadIndexes = CalculateCompartments(startInclusive, endExclusive, ref threads);

            if (threads > 1)
                Parallel.For(
                    0, threads, parallelOptions,
                    (liThread, lsState) =>
                    {
                        TLocal llLocal = localInit(liThreadIndexes[liThread], liThreadIndexes[liThread + 1]);

                        for (int liCounter = liThreadIndexes[liThread]; liCounter < liThreadIndexes[liThread + 1]; liCounter++)
                            body(liCounter, lsState, llLocal);

                        localFinally(llLocal, liThreadIndexes[liThread], liThreadIndexes[liThread + 1]);
                    }
                );
            else
            {
                TLocal llLocal = localInit(startInclusive, endExclusive);
                for (int liCounter = startInclusive; liCounter < endExclusive; liCounter++)
                    body(liCounter, null, llLocal);
                localFinally(llLocal, startInclusive, endExclusive);
            }
        }

        public static void For(
            int startInclusive, int endExclusive,
            ParallelOptions parallelOptions,
            Action<int, ParallelLoopState> body,
            int threads)
        {
            int[] liThreadIndexes = CalculateCompartments(startInclusive, endExclusive, ref threads);

            if (threads > 1)
                Parallel.For(
                    0, threads, parallelOptions,
                    (liThread, lsState) =>
                    {
                        for (int liCounter = liThreadIndexes[liThread]; liCounter < liThreadIndexes[liThread + 1]; liCounter++)
                            body(liCounter, lsState);
                    }
                );
            else
                for (int liCounter = startInclusive; liCounter < endExclusive; liCounter++)
                    body(liCounter, null);
        }

        public static void For(
            int startInclusive, int endExclusive,
            ParallelOptions parallelOptions,
            Action<int> body,
            int threads)
        {
            int[] liThreadIndexes = CalculateCompartments(startInclusive, endExclusive, ref threads);

            if (threads > 1)
                Parallel.For(
                    0, threads, parallelOptions,
                    (liThread) =>
                    {
                        for (int liCounter = liThreadIndexes[liThread]; liCounter < liThreadIndexes[liThread + 1]; liCounter++)
                            body(liCounter);
                    }
                );
            else
                for (int liCounter = startInclusive; liCounter < endExclusive; liCounter++)
                    body(liCounter);
        }

        public static void For(
            int startInclusive, int endExclusive,
            Action<int, ParallelLoopState> body,
            int threads)
        {
            For(startInclusive, endExclusive, new ParallelOptions(), body, threads);
        }

        public static void For(
            int startInclusive, int endExclusive,
            Action<int> body,
            int threads)
        {
            For(startInclusive, endExclusive, new ParallelOptions(), body, threads);
        }

        public static void For<TLocal>(
            int startInclusive, int endExclusive,
            Func<int, int, TLocal> localInit,
            Func<int, ParallelLoopState, TLocal, TLocal> body,
            Action<TLocal, int, int> localFinally,
            int threads)
        {
            For<TLocal>(startInclusive, endExclusive, new ParallelOptions(), localInit, body, localFinally, threads);
        }

        #endregion

        #region Long

        private static long[] CalculateCompartments(long startInclusive, long endExclusive, ref long threads)
        {
            if (threads == 0) threads = 1;
            if (threads == -1) threads = Environment.ProcessorCount;
            if (threads > endExclusive - startInclusive) threads = endExclusive - startInclusive;

            long[] liThreadIndexes = new long[threads + 1];
            liThreadIndexes[threads] = endExclusive - 1;
            long liIndexesPerThread = (endExclusive - startInclusive) / threads;
            for (long liCount = 0; liCount < threads; liCount++)
                liThreadIndexes[liCount] = liCount * liIndexesPerThread;

            return liThreadIndexes;
        }

        public static void For<TLocal>(
            long startInclusive, long endExclusive,
            ParallelOptions parallelOptions,
            Func<long, long, TLocal> localInit,
            Func<long, ParallelLoopState, TLocal, TLocal> body,
            Action<TLocal, long, long> localFinally,
            long threads)
        {
            long[] liThreadIndexes = CalculateCompartments(startInclusive, endExclusive, ref threads);

            if (threads > 1)
                Parallel.For(
                    0, threads, parallelOptions,
                    (liThread, lsState) =>
                    {
                        TLocal llLocal = localInit(liThreadIndexes[liThread], liThreadIndexes[liThread + 1]);

                        for (long liCounter = liThreadIndexes[liThread]; liCounter < liThreadIndexes[liThread + 1]; liCounter++)
                            body(liCounter, lsState, llLocal);

                        localFinally(llLocal, liThreadIndexes[liThread], liThreadIndexes[liThread + 1]);
                    }
                );
            else
            {
                TLocal llLocal = localInit(startInclusive, endExclusive);
                for (long liCounter = startInclusive; liCounter < endExclusive; liCounter++)
                    body(liCounter, null, llLocal);
                localFinally(llLocal, startInclusive, endExclusive);
            }
        }

        public static void For(
            long startInclusive, long endExclusive,
            ParallelOptions parallelOptions,
            Action<long, ParallelLoopState> body,
            long threads)
        {
            long[] liThreadIndexes = CalculateCompartments(startInclusive, endExclusive, ref threads);

            if (threads > 1)
                Parallel.For(
                    0, threads, parallelOptions,
                    (liThread, lsState) =>
                    {
                        for (long liCounter = liThreadIndexes[liThread]; liCounter < liThreadIndexes[liThread + 1]; liCounter++)
                            body(liCounter, lsState);
                    }
                );
            else
                for (long liCounter = startInclusive; liCounter < endExclusive; liCounter++)
                    body(liCounter, null);
        }

        public static void For(
            long startInclusive, long endExclusive,
            ParallelOptions parallelOptions,
            Action<long> body,
            long threads)
        {
            long[] liThreadIndexes = CalculateCompartments(startInclusive, endExclusive, ref threads);

            if (threads > 1)
                Parallel.For(
                    0, threads, parallelOptions,
                    (liThread) =>
                    {
                        for (long liCounter = liThreadIndexes[liThread]; liCounter < liThreadIndexes[liThread + 1]; liCounter++)
                            body(liCounter);
                    }
                );
            else
                for (long liCounter = startInclusive; liCounter < endExclusive; liCounter++)
                    body(liCounter);
        }

        public static void For(
            long startInclusive, long endExclusive,
            Action<long, ParallelLoopState> body,
            long threads)
        {
            For(startInclusive, endExclusive, new ParallelOptions(), body, threads);
        }

        public static void For(
            long startInclusive, long endExclusive,
            Action<long> body,
            long threads)
        {
            For(startInclusive, endExclusive, new ParallelOptions(), body, threads);
        }

        public static void For<TLocal>(
            long startInclusive, long endExclusive,
            Func<long, long, TLocal> localInit,
            Func<long, ParallelLoopState, TLocal, TLocal> body,
            Action<TLocal, long, long> localFinally,
            long threads)
        {
            For<TLocal>(startInclusive, endExclusive, new ParallelOptions(), localInit, body, localFinally, threads);
        }

        #endregion
    }
}

Primes base class:

using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace PrimeGenerator
{
    public abstract class Primes : IEnumerable<int>
    {
        protected readonly int msLimit;

        public Primes(int limit)
        {
            msLimit = limit;
        }

        public int Limit
        {
            get
            {
                return msLimit;
            }
        }

        public int Count
        {
            get
            {
                int liCount = 0;
                foreach (int liPrime in this)
                    liCount++;
                return liCount;
            }
        }

        public abstract IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator();

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return GetEnumerator();
        }
    }
}

Use it by doing the following:

    var lpPrimes = new Atkin(count, true);
    Console.WriteLine(lpPrimes.Count);
    Console.WriteLine(s.ElapsedMilliseconds);

However, i found the Eratosthenes to be quicker in all cases, even with a four core CPU running in multithreaded mode for the Atkin:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace PrimeGenerator
{
    public class Eratosthenes : Primes
    {
        protected BitArray mbaOddEliminated;

        public Eratosthenes(int limit)
            : base(limit)
        {
            if (mbaOddEliminated == null) FindPrimes();
        }

        public override IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
        {
            yield return 2;
            for (int lsN = 3; lsN <= msLimit; lsN+=2)
                if (!mbaOddEliminated[lsN>>1]) yield return lsN;
        }

        private void FindPrimes()
        {
            mbaOddEliminated = new BitArray((msLimit>>1) + 1);
            int lsSQRT = (int)Math.Sqrt(msLimit);
            for (int lsN = 3; lsN < lsSQRT + 1; lsN += 2)
                if (!mbaOddEliminated[lsN>>1])
                    for (int lsM = lsN*lsN; lsM <= msLimit; lsM += lsN<<1)
                        mbaOddEliminated[lsM>>1] = true;
        }
    }
}

If you get the Atkin to run faster, please let me know!

share|improve this answer
    
You can get the Sieve of Atkin (SoA) to run faster in several ways: 1) Avoid all need for the (expensive) modulo operations by recognizing that each of the quadratic sequences "4*x^2+y^2", "3*x^2+y^2", and "3*x^2-y^2" follow a modulo 15 pattern so as to only generate the appropriate modulo numbers for each following that pattern to be faster by over a factor of 2, 2) you can segment the culling arrays so that there aren't concurrency issues as each thread has one (preferably bit based) array. Of course, the SoE can also be segmented and have wheel factorization applied for an addition gain. –  GordonBGood Oct 10 '13 at 5:00
    
cont'd: In the end, the SoA only runs faster when the SoE is restricted to a wheel factorization of the same elimination of the factors of 2, 3, and 5 upon which the SoA is based; a maximally optimized SoE is still faster than a maximally optimized SoA for any ranges of primes we are likely to want to wait. This is even more true when written using a native compiling language such as C++ in that the simpler operations of the SoE are more conducive to compiler optimizations such that it can take as little as three CPU clock cycles per composite cull. I don't think SoA can be that efficient. –  GordonBGood Oct 10 '13 at 7:35
    
cont'd: I have written a C# version which enumerates all the 203,280,221 primes to (four billion plus) in about 7.5 seconds on an i7-2700K processor (3.5 GHz) another answer here which uses seqmentation, multi-threading, and wheel factorization. Over 2/3's of this time is enumerating the found primes, so the algorithm (SoE/SoA) doesn't matter much if both are optimized. That answer only uses 2,3,5 wheel factorization so an optimized SoA should be slightly faster, but if I used say 2,3,5,7,11,13 factorization then the SoE will be faster again. –  GordonBGood Oct 10 '13 at 10:24
    
it seems your later answer in the code translated from Python has improved the optimization issues I raise in my first comment, but you still haven't applied segmentation and multi-threading to the SoA... –  GordonBGood Oct 11 '13 at 4:16

Heres an improvement of the Sieve of Eratosthenes using custom FixBitArrays and unsafe code for speed results, this is about 225% faster than my previous Eratosthenes algorithm, and the class is standalone (this is not multithreaded - Eratosthenes is not compatible with multi threading), On an AMD Phenom II X4 965 Processor I can calculate Primes to 1,000,000,000 limit in 9,261 ms:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace PrimeGenerator
{
    // The block element type for the bit array, 
    // use any unsigned value. WARNING: UInt64 is 
    // slower even on x64 architectures.
    using BitArrayType = System.UInt32;

    // This should never be any bigger than 256 bits - leave as is.
    using BitsPerBlockType = System.Byte;

    // The prime data type, this can be any unsigned value, the limit
    // of this type determines the limit of Prime value that can be
    // found. WARNING: UInt64 is slower even on x64 architectures.
    using PrimeType = System.UInt32;

    /// <summary>
    /// Calculates prime number using the Sieve of Eratosthenes method.
    /// </summary>
    /// <example>
    /// <code>
    ///     var lpPrimes = new Eratosthenes(1e7);
    ///     foreach (UInt32 luiPrime in lpPrimes)
    ///         Console.WriteLine(luiPrime);
    /// </example>
    public class Eratosthenes : IEnumerable<PrimeType>
    {
        #region Constants

        /// <summary>
        /// Constant for number of bits per block, calculated based on size of BitArrayType.
        /// </summary>
        const BitsPerBlockType cbBitsPerBlock = sizeof(BitArrayType) * 8;

        #endregion

        #region Protected Locals

        /// <summary>
        /// The limit for the maximum prime value to find.
        /// </summary>
        protected readonly PrimeType mpLimit;

        /// <summary>
        /// The current bit array where a set bit means
        /// the odd value at that location has been determined
        /// to not be prime.
        /// </summary>
        protected BitArrayType[] mbaOddNotPrime;

        #endregion

        #region Initialisation

        /// <summary>
        /// Create Sieve of Eratosthenes generator.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="limit">The limit for the maximum prime value to find.</param>
        public Eratosthenes(PrimeType limit)
        {
            // Check limit range
            if (limit > PrimeType.MaxValue - (PrimeType)Math.Sqrt(PrimeType.MaxValue))
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();

            mpLimit = limit;

            FindPrimes();
        }

        #endregion

        #region Private Methods

        /// <summary>
        /// Finds the prime number within range.
        /// </summary>
        private unsafe void FindPrimes()
        {
            // Allocate bit array.
            mbaOddNotPrime = new BitArrayType[(((mpLimit >> 1) + 1) / cbBitsPerBlock) + 1];

            // Cache Sqrt of limit.
            PrimeType lpSQRT = (PrimeType)Math.Sqrt(mpLimit);

            // Fix the bit array for pointer access
            fixed (BitArrayType* lpbOddNotPrime = &mbaOddNotPrime[0])
                // Scan primes up to lpSQRT
                for (PrimeType lpN = 3; lpN <= lpSQRT; lpN += 2)
                    // If the current bit value for index lpN is cleared (prime)
                    if (
                            (
                                lpbOddNotPrime[(lpN >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] & 
                                ((BitArrayType)1 << (BitsPerBlockType)((lpN >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock))
                            ) == 0
                        )
                        // Leave it cleared (prime) and mark all multiples of lpN*2 from lpN*lpN as not prime
                        for (PrimeType lpM = lpN * lpN; lpM <= mpLimit; lpM += lpN << 1)
                            // Set as not prime
                            lpbOddNotPrime[(lpM >> 1) / cbBitsPerBlock] |= 
                                (BitArrayType)((BitArrayType)1 << (BitsPerBlockType)((lpM >> 1) % cbBitsPerBlock));
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets a bit value by index.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="bits">The blocks containing the bits.</param>
        /// <param name="index">The index of the bit.</param>
        /// <returns>True if bit is set, false if cleared.</returns>
        private bool GetBitSafe(BitArrayType[] bits, PrimeType index)
        {
            return (bits[index / cbBitsPerBlock] & ((BitArrayType)1 << (BitsPerBlockType)(index % cbBitsPerBlock))) != 0;
        }

        #endregion

        #region Public Properties

        /// <summary>
        /// Get the limit for the maximum prime value to find.
        /// </summary>
        public PrimeType Limit
        {
            get
            {
                return mpLimit;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the number of primes found in the range.
        /// </summary>
        public PrimeType Count
        {
            get
            {
                PrimeType lptCount = 0;
                foreach (PrimeType liPrime in this)
                    lptCount++;
                return lptCount;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Determines if a value in range is prime or not.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="test">The value to test for primality.</param>
        /// <returns>True if the value is prime, false otherwise.</returns>
        public bool this[PrimeType test]
        {
            get
            {
                if (test > mpLimit) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
                if (test <= 1) return false;
                if (test == 2) return true;
                if ((test & 1) == 0) return false;
                return !GetBitSafe(mbaOddNotPrime, test >> 1);
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region Public Methods

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the enumerator for the primes.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>The enumerator of the primes.</returns>
        public IEnumerator<PrimeType> GetEnumerator()
        {
            // Two always prime.
            yield return 2;

            // Start at first block, second MSB.
            int liBlock = 0;
            byte lbBit = 1;
            BitArrayType lbaCurrent = mbaOddNotPrime[0] >> 1;

            // For each value in range stepping in incrments of two for odd values.
            for (PrimeType lpN = 3; lpN <= mpLimit; lpN += 2)
            {
                // If current bit not set then value is prime.
                if ((lbaCurrent & 1) == 0)
                    yield return lpN;

                // Move to NSB.
                lbaCurrent >>= 1;

                // Increment bit value.
                lbBit++;

                // If block is finished.
                if (lbBit == cbBitsPerBlock) 
                {
                    // Move to first bit of next block.
                    lbBit = 0;
                    liBlock++;
                    lbaCurrent = mbaOddNotPrime[liBlock];
                }
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region IEnumerable<PrimeType> Implementation

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the enumerator for the primes.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>The enumerator for the prime numbers.</returns>
        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return GetEnumerator();
        }

        #endregion
    }
}

Primes found in 1,000,000,000: 50,847,534 in 9,261 ms

share|improve this answer
    
Quite fast but "Eratosthenes is not compatible with multi threading" is incorrect; it is if you take the right algorithmic approach: segment your large array into sub portions to cull each segment, which should be the size of the processor caches for better memory access efficiency, then use a number of threads equal to the number of processors to handle each successive segment page, with one extra segment for the foreground counter/enumerator to process. Your AMD X4 CPU's run time should by divided by 4 except for the time to count/enumerate the primes so about 2.5 seconds for 1 billion. –  GordonBGood Aug 20 '13 at 19:16

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