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Basically I want to draw a polygon, but I want the edges to appear soft rather than hard. Since the shape of the polygon is important, the edges have to go over the points.

I've found monotone cubic splines to be accurate for open curves (i.e., curves that don't wrap around on themselves), but the algorithms I've found precalculate points 0 and N. Can I somehow change them to work with a closed curve?

I am implementing this in JavaScript, but pseudo-code would just as well.

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Do you mean on canvas? –  Asad Mar 28 '13 at 20:36
    
Not really relevant, since I just need to figure out the coordinates. But yes. SVG would be ok too if you have the solution, in which case I can convert it to canvas. –  Blixt Mar 28 '13 at 23:38
    
By 'edges appear soft' do you mean 'vertices appear soft'? –  Andrew Mao Mar 29 '13 at 4:42
    
I mean that the angle difference between two edges (connected by a vertex) should be a smooth curve rather than an abrupt change. @MBo's got it right in his answer (see picture), although I would appreciate the same solution for monotone cubic splines. –  Blixt Mar 30 '13 at 2:16

1 Answer 1

There is an easy method (developed by Maxim Shemanarev) to construct (usually) good-looking closed Bezier curves set over a set of points. Example:

enter image description here

Key moments of algo:

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

and sample code:

  // Assume we need to calculate the control
    // points between (x1,y1) and (x2,y2).
    // Then x0,y0 - the previous vertex,
    //      x3,y3 - the next one.

    double xc1 = (x0 + x1) / 2.0;
    double yc1 = (y0 + y1) / 2.0;
    double xc2 = (x1 + x2) / 2.0;
    double yc2 = (y1 + y2) / 2.0;
    double xc3 = (x2 + x3) / 2.0;
    double yc3 = (y2 + y3) / 2.0;

    double len1 = sqrt((x1-x0) * (x1-x0) + (y1-y0) * (y1-y0));
    double len2 = sqrt((x2-x1) * (x2-x1) + (y2-y1) * (y2-y1));
    double len3 = sqrt((x3-x2) * (x3-x2) + (y3-y2) * (y3-y2));

    double k1 = len1 / (len1 + len2);
    double k2 = len2 / (len2 + len3);

    double xm1 = xc1 + (xc2 - xc1) * k1;
    double ym1 = yc1 + (yc2 - yc1) * k1;

    double xm2 = xc2 + (xc3 - xc2) * k2;
    double ym2 = yc2 + (yc3 - yc2) * k2;

    // Resulting control points. Here smooth_value is mentioned
    // above coefficient K whose value should be in range [0...1].
    ctrl1_x = xm1 + (xc2 - xm1) * smooth_value + x1 - xm1;
    ctrl1_y = ym1 + (yc2 - ym1) * smooth_value + y1 - ym1;

    ctrl2_x = xm2 + (xc2 - xm2) * smooth_value + x2 - xm2;
    ctrl2_y = ym2 + (yc2 - ym2) * smooth_value + y2 - ym2;
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Why don't you elaborate on this easy method in your answer? As this stands, the value of the answer is entirely dependent on the page at that URL not being taken down or moved. –  Asad Mar 29 '13 at 19:31
    
@Asad Yes, that makes sense –  MBo Apr 1 '13 at 4:40
    
Thanks! +1 for a great answer. –  Asad Apr 1 '13 at 4:49

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