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In the documentation the first view example looks like:

HTML:

<html>
  <head>
    <script type="text/x-handlebars" data-template-name="say-hello">
      Hello, <b>{{view.name}}</b>
    </script>
  </head>
</html>

JS:

var view = Ember.View.create({
  templateName: 'say-hello',
  name: "Bob"
});

and maybe I am being a muppet but I really don't understand what is going on. Could someone help.

I kind of understand the cases of {{view}}{{view}} around some html/handlebars where the actions and events will apply from the view definition in javascript. Also I appreciate that you can have a blockless single {{view MyApp.thingView}} which will render the template specified in the view into the the place the view helper is used (as well as making available properties in the view definition).

Is the {{view.x}} instantiating a view and if so why does the example use create rather than extend. Or is the view referring to the global var view (I'm assuming not since this is handlebars.) Could extend be used. Is this form just trying to say that you can access a view's properties inside a template where the view definition has templateName set to the template?

Thanks for any clarification

Update: After looking at the example again it looks like the var is used for the programmatic append in the other snippets. So we can assume that this is like having the template within two {{view App.aView}}{{/view}} elements and the view. form allows you to get at properties inside App.aView.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

<Update>

In response to the update in the question:

You should use {{#view App.SomeView}} ... {{/view}} if that view does not have any template associated to it. On the other hand, you should use {{view App.SomeView}} if a template has been created for this view via naming conventions or templateName property. Example:

{{view Ember.TextField valueBinding="view.userName"}}

</Update>

When you see {{view.propertyName}} in a Handlebars template, that means you're consuming/rendering a property from the View you are in, so your initial assumption is kind of right. For example:

App = Em.Application.create();

App.HelloView = Em.View.extend({
    welcome: 'Willkommen',
    userName: 'DHH',
    greeting: function() {
        return this.get('welcome') + ' ' + this.get('userName');
    }.property('welcome', 'userName')
});

Then in your application template:

<script type="text/handlebars">
<h1>App</h1>
{{#view App.HelloView}}
    {{view.greeting}}
{{/view}}
</script>

In this case, the {{view.greeting}} part will look into the scope of that View (HelloView) for a property named greeting (it would be the same for any of those properties), and not in the parent view (ApplicationView which is implied). You have to use {{view.propertyName}} whenever calling properties defined in the View. Properties defined in the controller can be accessed directly without a prefix.

One of the reasons for this, is to make sure you're calling the correct property. Consider the following:

App = Em.Application.create();

App.ApplicationView = Em.View.extend({
    userName: 'David'
});

App.HelloView = Em.View.extend({
    welcome: 'Willkommen',
    userName: 'DHH',
    greeting: function() {
        return this.get('welcome') + ' ' + this.get('userName');
    }.property('welcome', 'userName')
});

Now, both the application view and the inner view have been defined with a property named userName to represent slightly different things. In order to separate which one is which, you can use the view and parentView keywords to access the properties:

<script type="text/handlebars">
<h1>App</h1>
<!-- this comes from the ApplicationView -->
<h3>{{view.userName}}'s Profile</h3> 
{{#view App.HelloView}}
    <!-- this comes from the HelloView -->
    {{view.welcome}} {{view.userName}}
{{/view}}
</script>

And if you want/need to use the real name and nickname in this example, you'd have to:

<script type="text/handlebars">
<h1>App</h1>
{{#view App.HelloView}}
    <!-- this comes from the ApplicationView -->
    <h3>{{parentView.userName}}'s Profile</h3> 
    <!-- this comes from the HelloView -->
    {{view.welcome}} {{view.userName}}
{{/view}}
</script>

Relevant reference:

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Thanks for that. Was kind of what i gathered as I had another look at the example just now. I was being confused by the programmatic addition of the view as I've been normally using them as you have above, normally for events –  user2022581 Mar 28 '13 at 21:55
1  
Shouldn't your view helpers start with {{#view..., since they are block helpers? –  mavilein Mar 28 '13 at 22:00
1  
@mavilein yes they should. Updated –  MilkyWayJoe Mar 28 '13 at 22:07
    
Wasn't sure, because i thought these snippets were copy pasted from working code. I could not imagine that you wrote all this stuff from scratch^^ –  mavilein Mar 28 '13 at 22:14
    
haha i actually did :P –  MilkyWayJoe Mar 28 '13 at 22:15

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