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I have two classes with the same name in different namespaces. I want one of these classes to reference the other class. The reason is that I am migrating to some newer code and I want to update the old code to simply pass through to the newer code.

Here is a super basic example:

namespace project {
namespace legacy {

class Content {
 public:
  Content(const string& url) : url_(url) { }
  string url() { return url_; }
 private:
  string url_;
};

}} // namespace project::legacy;

namespace project {
namespace current {

class Content {
 public:
  Content(const string& url) : url_(url) {}
  string url() { return url_; }
 private:
  string url_;

}} // namespace project::current;

I expected to be able to do the following to project::legacy::Content, but I am having trouble with some linker issues. Is this an issue with how I'm trying to do this, or do I need to look more closely at my project files to see if I have some sort of weird dependency issues?

#include "project/current/Content.h"
namespace project {
namespace legacy {

class Content {
 public:
  Content(const string& url) : actualContent_(url) { }
  string url() { return actualContent_.url(); }
 private:
  project::current::Content actualContent_;
};

}} // namespace project::legacy;

The test application compiles fine if I try to reference an instance of project::current::Content but if I try to reference project::current::Content from project::legacy::Content I get an:

undefined reference to `project::current::Content::Content(...)`

UPDATE

As it turns out, this was a GNU Autotoolset issue and was unrelated to the actual topic. Thanks to everyone for their help and suggestions!

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Silly question, have you included the (presumably new) source file containing the implementation of project::current::Content in your project link step? –  Greg Hewgill Oct 14 '09 at 22:26
1  
@Greg I think so? I'm using autotoolset and it is sometimes hard to figure out exactly what is going on. However, I can create a new instance of project::current::Content in my test application without a problem. I am only getting this linker error when I use the legacy class which makes me wonder if I'm doing this same class name thing incorrectly. –  Beau Simensen Oct 14 '09 at 22:29
    
@Greg also worth noting that all of the files involved (test application, current code and legacy code) are all in the same autotoolset project. I only say this so that it is clear that the legacy code and the current code are not in separate libraries. –  Beau Simensen Oct 14 '09 at 22:36
    
If all the thing is in the same library and test can create new class instances you would not get such a link error. Are you sure all it is in the same lib? –  fnieto - Fernando Nieto Oct 14 '09 at 22:46
    
@fnieto Yes, I know for certain that the test application can instantiate both the current class and the legacy class. I only get the linker error if the legacy class tries to instantiate an instance of the current class itself. –  Beau Simensen Oct 14 '09 at 22:57

3 Answers 3

Have you tried ::project::current::Content ( notice :: at the start of the reference ).

This is similar to /path/to/file and path/to/file when locating file in the file system.

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I just tried that. It did not seem to make a difference. Thanks for the suggestion! –  Beau Simensen Oct 14 '09 at 22:50

You have }; missing in the first example, in project / legacy definition.

In Visual Studio 2008, the project with the following configuration:

current.h:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
using namespace std;

namespace project {
namespace current {

class Content {
 public:
  Content(const string& url) : url_(url) {}
  string url() { return url_; }
 private:
  string url_;

};
}
} // namespace project::current;

namespaces.cpp:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>

#include "current.h"

using namespace std;

namespace project {
namespace legacy {


class Content {
 public:
  Content(const string& url) : actualContent_(url) { }
  string url() { return actualContent_.url(); }
 private:
  project::current::Content actualContent_;
};

}

} // namespace project::legacy;



int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    return 0;
}

builds without problems.

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If the source files have the same name, they will create object files with the same name (at least in Visual C++ 2008). This will cause a problem as one of the object files will overwrite the other and linking will fail. Make sure that you either rename one of the files or more appropriately, rename one of the object files.

In order to rename one of the object files in Visual C++ 2008, right click on the source file, and select properties. Navigate to C/C++ -> Output Files. Change the Object File Name from $(IntDir)\ to $(IntDir)\$(InputName)1.obj.

Hope this helps.

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