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I'm doing an introductory course to T-SQL (SQL Server 2008). I have noticed the following pattern in my course ware and other online resources:

I know that creating a table if it already exists results in an error and that dropping that table first and then re-creating it solves this problem (i.e. in the case where the script is re-run). What is the reason for dropping a table and then re-creating it [sample 1], instead of testing first whether it exists and then skipping the creation process if it does exist [sample 2] ?

Sample 1:

IF OBJECT_ID('myTable') IS NOT NULL
    DROP TABLE myTable
GO
CREATE TABLE myTable (number INT PRIMARY KEY)
GO

Sample 2:

IF OBJECT_ID('myTable') IS NULL
    CREATE TABLE myTable (number INT PRIMARY KEY)
GO
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1 Answer 1

A table that already exists may not have the same fields as what you want. So, in your second example, you think the table is already there, and it is... but it's not what you want it to be.

If you always drop and re-create, you know that the table has all the fields you specified.

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4  
Just to note. You will only really see this in classes, books etc. You don't want to do this in test unless you have your test data scripted out as well, even more so in a model office environment, and you should never see something like this in a production environment. –  Kenneth Fisher Mar 28 '13 at 23:10
    
So if I understand correctly: Use sample 1 if you want the latest version of the table. Use sample 2 if the table is already populated (not poulated from a script) and you don't want to loose your data. –  carl5051088 Mar 28 '13 at 23:44
    
Sample 2 won't create a new table with the same name. Use ALTER TABLE to modify the fields in it. –  sachleen Mar 28 '13 at 23:48
    
everything depends on situation. Sometimes we feel drop and re create is better way to achieve it may be sometimes not. It's always depending on situation. we cannot blindly suggest a method as the better way. –  Maximus Mar 29 '13 at 6:19
    
It is very easy and incorrect to drop and recreate table in order to ensure the table has all new columns. At the end you are loosing all of your data. We are never using drop statements especially when applying updates to multiple clients. –  gotqn Mar 29 '13 at 8:26

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