Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I downloaded some source codes of a program and put it in a folder I want to find a function declaration from the folder on terminal, how to do it with shell command? thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
What do function-declarations look like in this source-code? –  ruakh Mar 28 '13 at 23:08
    
I just want to look for the string from a folder, in the folder there are many files, sub-folders –  user138126 Mar 28 '13 at 23:11

2 Answers 2

Try doing this

using :

grep -Hri function_name .

if you want only the path :

grep -ril function_name .

Explanations

  • the trailing . stands for current directory
  • -i : case-insensitive
  • -r : recursive
  • -H : Print the file name for each match
  • -l : Suppress normal output; instead print the name of each input file from which output would normally have been printed.

See man grep

Last but not least

An interesting tool is ack, it will avoid searching in .svn, .cvs, .git dirs and such... It is designed to search code.

Example :

$ cd /usr/share/perl5
$ ack -r 'Larry\s+Wall'
site_perl/Inline/C.pm
370:# bindings to. This code is mostly hacked out of Larry Wall's xsubpp program.

core_perl/overload/numbers.pm
5:#    Copyright (C) 2008 by Larry Wall and others

core_perl/CPAN.pm
876:#       From: Larry Wall <larry@wall.org>

or just file path :

$ ack -rl 'Larry\s+Wall'
vendor_perl/LWP.pm
site_perl/Inline/C.pm
core_perl/overload/numbers.pm
core_perl/CPAN.pm
core_perl/SelfLoader.pm
core_perl/AutoLoader.pm
core_perl/AutoSplit.pm
core_perl/Test/Harness.pm
core_perl/XSLoader.pm
core_perl/DB.pm

No need the ending . with ack (compared to grep)

share|improve this answer
2  
I think ack is the way to go for source code searches. –  squiguy Mar 28 '13 at 23:15
    
If you want to refine your search to specific file types and still use grep, you can use --include=*.<file_postfix>. –  Noich Jul 25 '13 at 14:10

This will go through all the files in the directory you opened and any subdirectories (though it messes up if there are spaces in a file or directory name), will search all of them for the FUNCTION that you put, and will output the path to the file and show the matching line. Run it by cding to the directory you opened, (and replace FUNCTION with the function you're looking for).

find . -type f | xargs grep FUNCTION
share|improve this answer
    
why there is a - in between? –  user138126 Mar 28 '13 at 23:18
    
The - is necessary, but should be attached to the word type. I'll fix it, thanks. –  Scott Mermelstein Mar 28 '13 at 23:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.