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I have two hash of arrays. I want to compare whether the keys in both hash of arrays contain the same values.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings; use strict;
my %h1 = (
      w => ['3','1','2'],
      e => ['6','2','4'],
      r => ['8', '1'],
     );

my %h2 = (
      w => ['1','2','3'],
      e => ['4','2','6'],
      r => ['4','1'],
     );

foreach ( sort {$a <=> $b} (keys %h2) ){
    if (join(",", sort @{$h1{$_}})
        eq join(",", sort @{$h1{$_}})) {    

        print join(",", sort @{$h1{$_}})."\n";
        print join(",", sort @{$h2{$_}})."\n\n";
    } else{
    print "no match\n"
    }
    }


if ("1,8" eq "1,4"){
    print "true\n";
} else{
    print "false\n";
}

The output is supposed to should be:

2,4,6
2,4,6

1,2,3
1,2,3

no match
false

but for some reason my if-statement isn't working. thanks

share|improve this question
    
Your conditionals are working. –  kjprice Mar 28 '13 at 23:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Smart match is an interesting solution; available from 5.010 onward:

if ([sort @{$h1{$_}}] ~~ [sort @{$h2{$_}}]) { ... }

The smart match on array references returns true when the corresponding elements of each array smartmatch themselves. For strings, smart matching tests for string equality.

This may be better than joining the members of an array, as smart matching works for arbitrary data*. On the other hand, smart matching is quite complex and has hidden gotchas


*on arbitrary data: If you can guarantee all your strings only contain numbers, then everything is allright. However, then you could just have used numbers instead:

%h1 = (w => [3, 1, 2], ...);
# sort defaults to alphabetic sorting. This is undesirable here
if ([sort {$a <=> $b} @{$h1{$_}}] ~~ [sort {$a <=> $b} @{$h2{$_}}]) { ... }

If your data may contain arbitrary strings, especially strings containing commata, then your comparision isn't safe — consider the arrays

["1foo,2bar", "3baz"], ["1foo", "2bar,3baz"] # would compare equal per your method
share|improve this answer
    
how do I get rid of the warning messages? Argument "e" isn't numeric in sort –  cooldood3490 Mar 29 '13 at 0:33
1  
@cooldood3490 To sort alphabetically, use the cmp operator instead of <=>, or leave out the code block from the sort–alphabetic sort is the default –  amon Mar 29 '13 at 0:35
if (join(",", sort @{$h1{$_}})
    eq join(",", sort @{$h1{$_}})) {  

Should be :

if (join(",", sort @{$h1{$_}})
    eq join(",", sort @{$h2{$_}})) {  

Note the $h2. You're comparing one hash to itself.

share|improve this answer
    
how do I get rid of the warning messages? Argument "e" isn't numeric in sort –  cooldood3490 Mar 29 '13 at 0:33
    
@cooldood3490 Oh yea, that first sort should be sort { $a cmp $b } –  kjprice Mar 29 '13 at 16:35
1  
@cooldood3490 cmp is for comparing lexically(alphabetically) and <=> is for comparing numerically. –  kjprice Mar 29 '13 at 16:36

Try this:It compares two hashes line by line exactly.

if (  join(",", sort @{ $h1{$_}})
      eq join(",", sort @{ $h2{$_}}) ) #Compares two lines exactly   
share|improve this answer

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