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I have a Oracle Database; and I want to create a table with two columns, one contain id and the other contain incremented dates in rows. i want to specify in my PL/SQL code the limit dates, and the code will generate the rows between the two limit dates (from and to).

This is an example output result :

+-----+--------------------+
|  id |dates               |
+-----+--------------------+
|  1  |01/02/2011 04:00:00 |
+-----+--------------------+
|  2  |01/02/2011 05:00:00 |
+-----+--------------------+
|  3  |01/02/2011 06:00:00 |
+-----+--------------------+
|  4  |01/02/2011 07:00:00 |
+-----+--------------------+
|  5  |01/02/2011 08:00:00 |
....
...
..
| 334 |05/03/2011 023:00:00|
+-----+--------------------+
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You haven't exactly deluged us with details, but this is the sort of construct you want:

select level as id
       , &&start_date + ((level-1) * (1/24) as dates
from dual
connect by level <= ((&&end_date - &&start_date)*24)
/

This assumes your input values are whole days, You will need to adjust the maths if your start or end date contains a time component.

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1  
<3 connect by level – ninesided Mar 29 '13 at 8:21

You would need to start with a date baseline:

vBaselineDate := TRUNC(SYSDATE);

OR

vBaselineDate := TO_DATE('28-03-2013 12:00:00', 'DD-MM-YYYY HH:MI:SS');

Then increment the baseline by adding fractions of a day depending on how large you want the range, eg: 1 minute, 1 hour etc.

FOR i IN 1..334 LOOP
  INSERT INTO mytable
    (id, dates)
    VALUES
      (i, (vBaselineDate + i/24));
END LOOP;
COMMIT;

1/24 = 1 hour. 1/1440 = 1 minute;

Hope this helps.

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