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In a certain part of my software, I want to simply get the source code of an URL, then I would like to parse that string (the source) and do something. Problem is, I can't figure out how to get said source when I actually run the program, even though it works in the IDLE.

import urllib2

user_agent = 'Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 5.5; Windows NT)'
req = urllib2.Request('http://www.google.com')
response = urllib2.urlopen(req)
page_source = response.read()

page_source

If I do that, for instance, "page_source" won't print anything, it will simply be silent and finish execution. I believe it's because of it not being synchronous, but then I don't know how to solve it. I even tried (as a desperate attempt):

import urllib2
import time

user_agent = 'Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 5.5; Windows NT)'
req = urllib2.Request('http://www.google.com')
response = urllib2.urlopen(req)
page_source = response.read()

time.sleep(4)

page_source

Which also doesn't work.

I already thought of getting response.code and making a a while loop, something along those lines:

while (response.code !== 200):
    time.sleep(4)

But then again, it fails because "response.code" simply doesn't return anything.

I'm not worrying about problems such as user being connected and so on because the rest of the code already takes care of that, I really just need to figure out how to get a page source and parse it.

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If I add print response.code, page_source at the end of your code, it shows "200" and the HTML document without any problem. –  A. Rodas Mar 28 '13 at 23:55
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The request is indeed synchronous. The problem is just that evaluating an expression does not actually print it. If you want to see the value you must explicitly use print:

import urllib2

user_agent = 'Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 5.5; Windows NT)'
req = urllib2.Request('http://www.google.com')
response = urllib2.urlopen(req)
page_source = response.read()

print page_source

You probably noticed that the print is not necessary when entering code in the Python shell. This is because the Python shell parses and executes code in a slightly different way than when it appears as a module, detecting if the input parses as a standalone expression and printing it automatically if so. This shorthand does not apply when executing a source file.

If you're interested in the gory details of the different ways Python can parse a string as source code, see the built-in compile function; notice that it has a mode argument that chooses between three different possible parsing modes. The Python shell uses the mode single, while normal source files are compiled as exec. The final mode, eval, is used by Python's built in eval function.

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Oh God, I can't believe it was that simple, thanks a lot! –  ShizukaSM Mar 29 '13 at 1:20
1  
If this answered your question, please consider selecting it as your accepted answer. :) –  Martin Atkins Mar 29 '13 at 15:03
    
Sorry about the delay! I'm still getting used to stackoverflow. –  ShizukaSM Mar 29 '13 at 16:09
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