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My class currently looks like this

    class Hist
    {
    private:
    typedef boost::tuple<double,double,double> tuple;
    typedef boost::shared_ptr<tuple> shared_tuple;
    typedef std::vector<shared_tuple> tuple_vector;
    typedef boost::shared_ptr<tuple_vector> shared_tuple_vector;


    typedef std::map<int,shared_tuple_vector> inner_map;
    typedef boost::shared_ptr<inner_map> shared_inner_map;

    static std::map<std::string, shared_inner_map> stat_History_base;
    static bool CheckStatus(std::string symb );
    };

and then I have this method which is causing a very very huge linker error.

 bool Hist::CheckStatus(std::string symb )
{

    std::map<std::string,Hist::shared_inner_map>::iterator found =  stat_History_base.find(symb);
    if(found != stat_History_base.end())
    {
        //Symbol does exist
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}
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1  
What's the error? –  Tushar Mar 29 '13 at 0:03
    
The folks of Stack Overflow are very good at reading huge linker errors. –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 29 '13 at 0:04
1  
My bet is stat_History_base not being defined –  Andy Prowl Mar 29 '13 at 0:07
    
@AndyProwl good eye. –  Tushar Mar 29 '13 at 0:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It seems the problem is that you are not providing a definition for your static member variable stat_History_base.

You should add this to the global namespace:

std::map<std::string, BaseHistory::shared_inner_map_def> 
BaseHistory::stat_History_base;

Notice, that you have to make the shared_inner_map_def public in order for it to be accessible from external code (in your code it is currently being declared as private).

Also:

Initially it was working fine until i replaced a std::list with a vector

It is hard to believe that this is indeed the case, since the problem with your code is that it lacked a definition for a static data member.

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Thanks that did the trick –  MistyD Mar 29 '13 at 0:13
    
@MistyD: Ok, I'm glad it helped –  Andy Prowl Mar 29 '13 at 0:14

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