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I am working on my first website and I am a little confused as to how I would center my navigation bar. I have tried defining a width, made sure it was a block element and set margin-left and margin-right to auto but it still isn't centering. Here are my css and html files.

HTML:

<html>
<head>
    <title>Test Site</title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="styles.css">
</head>

<body>
    <div class="nav">
        <ul>
            <li><a href="#">Home</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Forums</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Misc</a>
                <ul>
                    <li><a href="#">1</a></li>
                    <li><a href="#">2</a></li>
                    <li><a href="#">3</a></li>
                    <li><a href="#">4</a></li>
                </ul>
            </li>
            <li><a href="#">Donate</a></li>
        </ul>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

CSS:

.nav > ul {
    width: 960px;
    display: block;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
}

.nav ul {
    list-style: none;
    background: #444444;
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
}

.nav li {
    float: left;
    width: 150px;
    position: relative;
    background: #444444;
    text-align: center;
    border: 1px solid white;
    height: 30px;
    line-height: 30px;
}

.nav li ul li {
    float: none;
    width: 140px;
    text-align: left;
    padding: 5px;
    border-top: 1px solid white;
    line-height: 30px;
}

.nav li ul {
    position: absolute;
    top: 30px;
    left: 0px;
    visibility: hidden;
}

.nav li:hover {
    background-color: maroon;
}

.nav li:hover ul {
    visibility: visible;

}

.nav a {
    text-decoration: none;
    color: white;
}

.nav li ul {
    float: none;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Courtesy jsFiddle –  JCOC611 Mar 29 '13 at 0:10
    
jsfiddle.net/s98fC/10 –  alexfreiria Mar 29 '13 at 0:21

4 Answers 4

You're overriding the definitions that would've made it centered ...

Change:

.nav > ul {
    width: 960px;
    display: block;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
}

.nav ul {
    list-style: none;
    background: #444444;
    margin: 0px; /* overrides previously defined margin */
    padding: 0px; /* overrides previously defined margin */
}

To:

.nav > ul {
    width: 960px;
    display: block;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
}

.nav ul {
    list-style: none;
    background: #444444;
    /* margin: 0; */
    padding: 0px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure what I am doing to override the definitions, would you mind elaborating more so I could avoid doing this in the future? –  AvP Mar 29 '13 at 0:13
    
This is not quite the same, as now the top ul has the list style ( bullet points ) and it makes the design look sloppy. jsfiddle.net/s98fC/3 –  Travis J Mar 29 '13 at 0:13
    
@travisj i'm not trying to make his design "better" or any "less sloppy," i'm directly answering his question regarding the centering of the nav menu. –  alexfreiria Mar 29 '13 at 0:14
    
@Xander - I understand where the confusion is coming from. I downvoted, but I will remove it with an edit. I believe you have a typo in your solution and that nav > ul ul was intended to be nav ul. As a result of the typo, the affect on nav was noticeable and degraded the content. –  Travis J Mar 29 '13 at 0:21
    
no, it wasn't a typo ... –  alexfreiria Mar 29 '13 at 0:22

the width of .nav>ul is set more than total width of all nav items inside it. It should be width: 608px; and you need to add margin: 0 auto; to .nav ul rule declaration

Final rules for .nav > ul and .nav ul

.nav > ul{
  width: 608px;
  display: block;
  margin-left: auto;
  margin-right: auto;
}

.nav ul{
  list-style: none;
  background: #444;
  margin: 0 auto;
  padding: 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seemed to do the trick but I was wondering why it had to be 608px, I have tried lower and higher values and it shifted the navigation bar left and right. –  AvP Mar 29 '13 at 2:45
    
Setting it to 608px helps because main nav <ul> becomes shorter in width than its container and it can be move around horizontally. The other thing that is necessary to fix your problem is setting margin:0 auto for .nav ul. See, all <ul> in your markup including the submenu. However the submenu has no room on left/right so it just stick in its place. I hope it's understandable now. please check my other answer that deals with cascading (the first C in CSS) –  Ejay Mar 29 '13 at 10:19

change .nav > ul ul to .nav > ul li and

.nav li ul {
    position: relative;
    top: 0px;
    padding-left:0;
    visibility: hidden;
}
share|improve this answer

Another (and a better) approach is to

  1. swap the position of .nav > ul and .nav ul rule, i.e., specifying the (more specific) .nav > ul rule after (a relatively generic) .nav ul
  2. and setting width: 608px; in .nav > ul

This is how it works:

a) .nav ul sets the margin: 0; padding: 0 to all <ul> elements. It removes default padding/margin for all <ul> elements.

b) Now (assuming, for .nav > ul, you don't have left and right margins set to auto and width is 960px) you've a left aligned main nav that covers its container horizontally. So, to make it horizontally centered, you set its width to minimun width you can without moving your nav items to new line, i.e., 608px and set margins to auto in order to center it horizontally in its container.

Here's the CSS

.nav ul{
   list-style: none;
   background: #444444;
   margin: 0px;
   padding: 0px;
}

.nav > ul{
   width: 608px;
   display: block;
   margin-left: auto;
   margin-right: auto;
}

I hope it helps

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