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No idea how I could rephrase the title better.

I want to move low level code outside of a simple function and move the code inside the class so the class takes care of the more complicated stuff.
I want to go from this:

void a(void) {
    [low level operation];
    //User typed simple operations
    [low level operation];
}

static void AClass::b() {
    register(a); //register(void (__cdecl *func)())
}

int main(void) {
    AClass::b();
    return 0;
}

To:

void a(void) {
    //[no low level operation]
    //User typed simple operations
    //[no low level operation]
}

static void AClass::b(void (*func)()) {
    auto funcA = [] (void (*func)()) -> void (*)() { 
        [that first low level operation]; 
        func(); //Which is: void a(void);
        [the second low level operation]; 
    };
    register(funcA(func));
}

int main(void) {
    AClass::b(&a);
    return 0;
}

At the moment I get the error "< lambda >::operator ()' : function must return a value" - because of the pointer. How could I solve this problem? Returning just void doesn't work. Passing the arguments(the function "func") by reference to the lambda also doesn't work(Cause in this case the lambda is not just a function any more but a Class) - the register(void (__cdecl *func)()) can't convert the now not a function lambda.

Any ideas how to solve my problem?

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3  
You do know that register is a keyword in C++? Deprecated, but still there. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 29 '13 at 1:20
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf The "register" function asks for "void (__cdecl*)(void)" which means no parameters. And also, the a(void) is not the problem here. The lambda is. I try to make the lambda return void (*)(void) so it pleases "register" but I can't, sure. –  Lilian A. Moraru Mar 29 '13 at 1:23
    
sorry about answering this on first impressions. second impression: the code is not meaningful, even if the intent is. instead of using lambda functions etc. i suggest you look up the "template pattern" (which is not about using C++ templates). –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 29 '13 at 1:24
    
@JoachimPileborg I used it here just for the purpose of the demonstration. The function is actually called in the application "glutDisplayFunc" - from the Glut library. Also the error is not saying that I use a keyword but it's because of the pointer. –  Lilian A. Moraru Mar 29 '13 at 1:25

2 Answers 2

Stateful lambdas cannot be turned into function pointers.

Only lambdas with no state can be turned into function pointers.

Your state needs to slide in through some back door. glutDisplayFunc, only takes a stateless function pointer. Modifying it isn't possible.

If you can find a back door to store something, you can use that to store an arbitrary lambda. In this case, glutDisplayFunc is associated with the current window. Is there any place you can shove state in the current window, and figure out which one that is?

Suppose you find such a void*. Then simply allocate a std::function<void()>, shove it in there, and register the following lambda:

void AClass::b(void (*func)()) {
   auto funcA = [func] () { 
     [that first low level operation]; 
     func(); //Which is: void a(void);
     [the second low level operation]; 
   };
   registerPVoidSomewhere( new std::function<void()>( funcA ) );

   register([]() {
     void* pVoid = getPVoidFromWhereIHideItAbove();
     std::function<void()>* pFunc = reinterpret_cast<std::function<void()>*>( pVoid );
     if (pFunc) {
       (*pFunc)();
     };
   } );
}

Now, I'm betting that when the glutDisplayFunc is called, it is called from a context when you can ask glut what the current window is. Maybe that window has a place for a user-defined void*, or you could have a global map from window pointer to void* that you manage (in that second case, you could even have a global map from window pointer to std::function<void()>, and get rid of that nasty casting).

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This turns into something ugly :) May be I should better keep those functions in the "void a" function? –  Lilian A. Moraru Mar 29 '13 at 2:01
1  
@LilianA.Moraru A function with signature void() has no state to keep things, unless you shove things into global variables, or do atrocious hacks. Hence the need for a back-door state. I'm betting that there is back-door state in your case, and that is the intended way to handle state for the callback function. –  Yakk Mar 29 '13 at 2:19
    
No global variables or atrocious hacks... That's why I don't really want to go the road of this solution. I wanted to keep it clean and simple. Glut can do those 2 operations from anywhere after it was initialized. I am not doing any hacks/global variables... For example, you could compare it to how Botan works. Initialize the pipe and than from wherever you call the Botan functions it will affect one single point, you don't have to pass variables around. –  Lilian A. Moraru Mar 29 '13 at 2:23
    
Solved the problem in another way... What is not shown in my example code is that in "void a()" the AClass is initialized once. I used the RAII idiom in C++: I added the first low level operation into the constructor of the class and the second low level operation into the destructor. –  Lilian A. Moraru Mar 29 '13 at 9:34

There are two problems, one with the types and one that you declare the lambda to return a function pointer but actually don't return anything.

The first can easily be solved by using templates:

struct AClass
{
    template<typename Ft>
    static void b(Ft func)
    {
        auto funcA = [&func]()
        {
            // Do some stuff
            func();
            // Do some other stuff
        };
        some_register_function(funcA);
    }
};

As you can see I also changed the lambda declaration, because in your version you actually call it, which will also call the function pointer you pass in as argument, and this solves the second problem.

Please note that I don't actually know if it will work, as glutDisplayFunc is a pure C function in a pure C library, and don't know anything about lambdas or function objects.

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1  
This won't work – glutDisplayFunc accepts a function pointer, but only captureless lambdas are convertible to function pointers. –  ildjarn Mar 29 '13 at 1:43
    
Nope, doesn't work. Because I don't specify the type of the lambda it returns void while glutDisplayFunc asks for void (__cdecl *)(). It's still the problem with the lambda... –  Lilian A. Moraru Mar 29 '13 at 1:43
    
@Lilian : This isn't invoking the lambda, so it doesn't matter what the lambda's return type is. The problem here is that this lambda has a capture list, and consequently cannot be converted to a function pointer as glutDisplayFunc wants. –  ildjarn Mar 29 '13 at 1:46

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