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I don't understand why I have to do the following in Objective-C. I'm interested in discovering why, in a general sense (i.e. why does the language/compiler force me to do it this way), and maybe discover alternatives to the implementation I have come up with:

I have a protocol:

// (file: MyObserver.h)
@class TheObserved;
@protocol MyObserver <NSObject>
   - (void)itWasObserved:(TheObserved *)observedInstance;
@end

There is an interface, 'TheObserved' that (cyclically) uses the protocol:

// (file: TheObserved.h)
@protocol MyObserver;
@interface TheObserved : NSObject
   @property id <MyObserver> myObserver;
   - (void)lookAtThisData:(NSString *)someData withObserver:(id <MyObserver>)observer;
@end

This is to say, as you can see, the protocol has a message which takes an instance of the interface, and the interface has a method which takes an instance that implements the protocol.

In my implementation of the interface:

// (file: TheObserved.m)
#import "TheObserved.h"
#import "MyViewController.h" // <-- note this import
@implementation TheObserved
    @synthesize myObserver;

    - (void)lookAtThisData:(NSString *)someData withObserver:(id <MyObserver>)observer {
        self.myObserver = observer;
        // some asynchronous looking at the data is done here.
    }

    - (void)asynchCallback:(NSData *) data {
        // check if the data is as we expect, if so ..
        [self.myObserver itWasObserver: self]
    }
@end

MyViewController.h implements the protocol:

// (file: MyViewController.h)
#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import "OWLMorphDataObserver.h"
@interface MyViewController : UITableViewController <MyObserver>
@end

And in its implementation:

// (file: MyViewController.m)
#import "TheObserved.h"
@interface MyViewController () {
  @property TheObserved *observed;
@end

@implementation MyViewController
   @synthesize observed;
   - (void) aMethod:(NSString *)dataString {
       [self.observed lookAtThisData:dataString withObserver:self]
   }
@end

My question is: why do, in my Observed class, I need to #import the "MyViewController.h" which implements the @protocol even though the concrete implementation is never explicitly referenced in the Observed class? If I don't, I get and compilation error:

no known instance method for selector 'lookAtThisData:'

The issue here is, of course that I want to have multiple different view controllers implement this protocol. So why am I forced to import one of them to get it to compile?

Is there another way I can structure this code to get the desired effect without a importing a concrete implementation of the protocol in the class that wants to use it?

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1  
can you name the files in which each snippet is contained? e.g. "I have a protocol" add "Defined in foo.h". –  danh Mar 29 '13 at 1:22
    
sure, I did that. –  scot Mar 29 '13 at 1:26
1  
The error message does not match the code you've posted. -lookAtThisData: and -lookAtThisData:withObserver: are two different methods. Otherwise, the code you've posted is correct. -lookAtThisData:withObserver: is declared in TheObserved.h, and that's the header you need to import in order to call that method. –  Darren Mar 29 '13 at 1:43
    
Yeah sorry about that, it's simplified code that I re-typed rather than cut-and-pasted. –  scot Mar 29 '13 at 8:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You do not have to import "MyViewController.h".

You do have to import "MyObserver.h". Otherwise, the MyObserver protocol won't be known. Anyplace you want to refer to the protocol MyObserver, you must import the file that defines the protocol. That file is "MyObserver.h".

And anyplace you want to refer to the method lookAtThisData:withObserver:, you must import "TheObserver.h", because that is where that method is published.

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Sorry I'm having a hard time following the example you give. I use this pattern without needing any extra includes...

A class defines a protocol that others will implement...

//  Foo.h

@protocol FooDelegate;  // promise to define protocol, so we can refer to it in @interface

@interface Foo : NSObject
@property(nonatomic, weak) id<FooDelegate> delegate;
@end

// now define the protocol
@protocol FooDelegate <NSObject>
- (CGFloat)getFloatForFoo:(Foo *)aFoo;
@end

The implementation can call the protocol, knowing that the delegate implements it...

// Foo.m

#import "Foo.h"

- (void)anyFooMethod {
    CGFloat aFloatFromMyDelegate = [self.delegate getFloatForFoo:self];
}

Another class declares itself as an implementor of the protocol (publicly or privately, but privately is usually right).

// OtherClass.m

#import "Foo.h"  // notice only one, intuitive import

@interface OtherClass <FooDelegate>
@end

@implementation OtherClass

- (id)init {

    // normal init jazz
    Foo *aFoo = [[Foo alloc] init];
    aFoo.delegate = self;
}

@end
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Your example seemed incomplete to me, so I created an example that I think illustrates the problem, in a self contained way.

MyObserver.h:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@class TheObserved;

@protocol MyObserver <NSObject>
- (void)itWasObserved:(TheObserved *)observedInstance;
@end

TheObserved.h:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@protocol MyObserver;

@interface TheObserved : NSObject

@property id <MyObserver> myObserver;
- (void)lookAtThisData:(NSString *)someData withObserver:(id <MyObserver>)observer;

@end

TheObserved.m:

#import "TheObserved.h"

@implementation TheObserved
@synthesize myObserver;

- (void)lookAtThisData:(NSString *)someData withObserver:(id <MyObserver>)observer {
    self.myObserver = observer;
    // some asynchronous looking at the data is done here.
}

- (void)asynchCallback:(NSData *) data {
    // check if the data is as we expect, if so ..
    [self.myObserver itWasObserved: self];
}
@end

MyObserverImplementation.h: (this is MyViewController.h in your example)

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import "MyObserver.h"

@interface MyObserverImplementation : NSObject <MyObserver>

@end

MyObserverImplementation.m:

#import "MyObserverImplementation.h"
#import "TheObserved.h"

@interface MyObserverImplementation ()
@property TheObserved *observed;
@end

@implementation MyObserverImplementation

- (void) aMethod:(NSString *)dataString {
    [self.observed lookAtThisData:dataString withObserver:self];
}

@end

This program does not build, because of an error in TheObserved.h:

No known instance method for selector 'itWasObserved:'

Importing MyObserverImplementation.h from TheObserved.m does, however, fix this error (this is analogous to your need to import MyViewController.h from TheObserved.m). But it only fixes the error because MyObserverImplementation.h imports MyObserver.h. TheObserved.m has no visibility of the method declared in MyObserver.h otherwise, because you only forward-declared the protocol and never imported it.

You can fix the problem by directly importing MyObserver.h from within TheObserved.m instead of importing the view controller.

This answer is predicated, of course, on the correctness of my reconstruction of your example.

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