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Because I'm running into this MIXLIB-11 error that I've reported to Mixlib team, I need to find a walkaround, an alternative to Mixlib::Shellout.

Briefly about the problem:

Here is a statement which says "*No surprise -- the read is happening at compile time, but the remote_file resource is actually created at execution time.**"

Because of this feature, Mixlib::Shellout.new("ls", :cwd => '/opt/cubrid/share/webmanager') raises "No such file or directory" error even though that directory is created at execution time by a previous recipe included in this current recipe.

Is there a way to read a file/directory at execution time?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Found an answer: wrap the code in ruby_block, and it will be executed at run time.

ruby_block "Check if CURBID Web Manager needs installation" do
  block do
    version = ""

    if File.exists?("#{CWM_HOME_DIR}/appLoader.js")
      # Read the CWM version from file.
      f = File.open("#{CWM_HOME_DIR}/appLoader.js")

      pattern = /Ext\.cwm\.prodVersion = '(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)'/

      f.each {|line|
        if match = pattern.match(line)
          version = match[1]
          break
        end
      }

      f.close
    end
  end
end

Now the version is correctly populated from the file created in the previous recipe.

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Consider a remote_file. It is executed at execution (run) time, and it can also works with local files for example:

remote_file "Copy file" do
  path "file:///opt/destination.txt"
  source "file:///opt/source.txt"
  owner 'root'
  group 'root'
  mode 0755
end

So using remote_file is good work around. While writing a custom code require a time and can be error prone. See also this answer.

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