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I have 2 bash files, file a.sh and file b.sh.

contents of the file a.sh

# !/bin/bash
(/root/b.sh) & # <--- must be run in the background!!!
sleep 1
echo "--${VAR}--"

contents of the file b.sh

# !/bin/bash
VAR=100

run script /root/a.sh and the result is: ----

why is not the result: --100-- ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Hi, the simplest way is to use a temp file, try this example:

a.sh

# !/bin/bash

ROOT_DIR="$( cd "$( dirname "${BASH_SOURCE[0]}" )" && pwd )"
SCRIPT_FILE="$ROOT_DIR/b.sh"

$SHELL $SCRIPT_FILE &
SCRIPT_PID=$!
TEMP_FILE="/tmp/$SCRIPT_PID.data"

# kill child process on exit
trap cleanup EXIT INT TERM
cleanup() {
  kill $SCRIPT_PID
  exit $?
}

# wait child process to put data
waitdata() {
  while [ ! -f $TEMP_FILE ]
  do
    sleep 1
  done
}

# main loop
while :
do
    waitdata
    VAR=$(cat $TEMP_FILE)
    echo $VAR
    sleep 2
done

b.sh

#!/bin/bash

# my pid
TEMP_FILE="/tmp/$$.data"

# trap (control-c, kill, etc)
trap cleanup EXIT INT TERM
cleanup() {
  rm -f $TEMP_FILE
  exit $?
}

# main loop
while :
do
    VAR=$(date)
    #echo $VAR
    echo $VAR > $TEMP_FILE
    sleep 2
done


I hope this can help :)

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Thank you very much!! ;-) –  Jakub Mar 30 '13 at 18:08

Changes to environment variables in a subprocess (subshell, background script, etc.) don't propagate back to the parent process. In other words, the shell process that runs a.sh has its own copy of the environment variables, the shell process that runs b.sh has its own completely separate copy, and when you change VAR in the "b" shell, it doesn't change anything in the "a" shell.

To get the value 100 back into the "a" shell, you'll have to do something like printing it to standard output and reading it in a.sh, or using some other method of interprocess communication.

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...like printing it to standard output and reading it in a.sh.. Can you clarify? thank you –  Jakub Mar 29 '13 at 2:34

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