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I'm in the process of converting some older Boost regex code to C++11, and I stumbled upon an issue with one of my test cases. Here is a scenario which causes a stack overflow exception using std::regex, but worked fine with boost::regex. I have not changed the regular expression pattern, and have verified the pattern is what I want. It seems this particular string input fragment is causing the stack overflow. Using VS2012, x64 debug build:

std::regex regx( "(^|\\})(([^\\{:])+:)+([^\\{]*\\{)" );

    const std::string testinput = " COLOR: #000; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #FFF; FONT-FAMILY: VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF; BACKGROUND:URL(URL(___FOO___)); BACKGROUND-2:URL(URL(___FOO___)); BORDER: 0 0 0 0; BORDER-2: 0 0 0; BORDER-3: 0 0; BORDER-4: 0PX; BORDER-5: 0.6; FILTER:PROGID:DXIMAGETRANSFORM.MICROSOFT.ALPHA(OPACITY=100); } ";
    std::smatch what;
    // this next line causes a stack overflow
    std::regex_search( testinput.cbegin(), testinput.cend(), what, regx );  

Looking at the call stack after the exception, there seems to be some type of infinite recursion going on in the regex implementation. I don't currently have GCC to test this with. What am I doing wrong?

Update: After the suggestions below, I pasted this code into a console app, VS 2012 x64 debug and I get the stack overflow. If I change it to x64 release, or Win32 debug or release it runs fine. Huh??? Do i need to reinstall VS and/or the platform SDK? I'm on Win7 x64.

Update #2: Somewhat related post: Why does std::regex_iterator cause a stack overflow with this data? I suppose if I rewrite my regex, it might help. I'm still not sure why the bitness matters though. And why it works for others, but not for me on my system. Sigh.

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I'm not reproducing this crash in my installation of VS 2012 with a 64-bit debug build. A direct copy of the code above, inside a main function, simply returns false from the call to regex_search - no match. –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 29 '13 at 4:05
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Works fine on mine (32-bit) as well. –  W.B. Mar 29 '13 at 8:56
    
@DanNissenbaum, thanks for confirming. I updated my question; seems to only happen in x64 debug. x64 release or the Win32 builds run fine. I don't get it? –  Tom Mar 29 '13 at 17:31
    
Perhaps a clean solution (i.e., full rebuild)? –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 29 '13 at 20:08
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I'm also unable to reproduce this in my installation of VS 2012. Looks to be specific to your app, or maybe to your some configuration settings within your project? –  Kyle C Mar 29 '13 at 21:32

1 Answer 1

I've been reproduced this with x64 debug build, and I belive this is a real stack overflow.

When you change your stack size to 10MB or so (linker command line option /STACK:"10000000"), it will work fine.

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Thanks, I agree this is a valid workaround. Makes me wonder, though, if this is the actual solution, or just a way to cover up defects in <regex>, especially since boost regex runs fine in the same app. Since release mode apparently reuses the stack, it shouldn't be a problem I suppose...thanks again –  Tom Apr 2 '13 at 17:25
    
I think this is a some kind of defect. I've not investigate the <regex> code, but even x86/Release very simple regex pattern will cause stack overflow. Please check this: using namespace std; regex r("(x)+"); string t(512, 'x'); regex_search(t, r); –  t-mat Apr 2 '13 at 19:15
    
Yes, I can reproduce the same problem in x86 and x64 debug and release modes. Interesting... –  Tom Apr 2 '13 at 22:19

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