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All the solution I found seem to use atoll but that takes char while I have a string. For example I read an input $100, put it into a string and check if the first char is $. Then I need to convert the substring to a long long type.

int main() {

    long long price;
    string priceStr;

    cin>>priceStr;
    if (priceStr[0] == '$') {
        price = convertToLongLong(priceStr.substr(1));//how?
    }else{
        cerr<<"error!";
    }

}

My input is : $100 Thanks!

EDIT: Maybe I'm not doing it in a proper way. My input stream is ID Name $price #quantity like below and I need all numbers to be long long and also check if $ and # sighs are at right place:

1 TV $1500 #50

2 LAPTOP $2000 #30

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1  
Whatever you do, don't use that. How will you know whether the number was 0 or it encountered an error? There are stoll, strtoll, string streams, boost::lexical_cast, and others that all provide error checking. –  chris Mar 29 '13 at 2:31
    
...you don't need a long long to store 100. –  ValekHalfHeart Mar 29 '13 at 2:31
    
long long is needed, I'm just using 100 as an example... @ValekHalfHeart –  Arch1tect Mar 29 '13 at 2:33
    
Hi @chris For example if I use strtoll which takes (const char* str, char** endptr, int base), but I only have a string, what should I do then? Thanks. –  Arch1tect Mar 29 '13 at 3:13
3  
@Arch1tect, Documentation for std::string clearly lists c_str() and data(). –  chris Mar 29 '13 at 3:30
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You've a couple of options, if the STL is your only option:

int main() {

    long long price;
    string priceStr;

    cin>>priceStr;
    if (priceStr[0] == '$') {
        std::istringstream is (priceStr.begin() + 1, priceStr.end());
        is >> price;
        if (!is)
            cerr << "fail!" << endl;
    }else{
        cerr<<"error!";
    }
}

If you can use Boost:

int main() {

    long long price;
    string priceStr;

    cin>>priceStr;
    if (priceStr[0] == '$') {
        price = boost::lexical_cast<long long>(&*priceStr.begin() + 1, priceStr.size() -1); // throws if it cannot convert.
    }else{
        cerr<<"error!";
    }
}

Note that there's no bounds checking in the second example, you'd surely want to implement that before doing what I've shown above. (i.e. check that priceStr.size() >= 2).

As others have suggested, you could use variants of stoll, but be aware these functions don't report errors well, if at all.

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Thanks a lot I'm using your first method now and changed priceStr.begin() + 1, priceStr.end() to priceStr.substr(1) –  Arch1tect Mar 29 '13 at 3:50
    
You should handle failure of the other cin streaming operation too ala if (std::cin >> priceStr) ... else ...;. As is you may access [0] on an empty string - undefined behaviour - then possibly attempt to construct a string where the start iterator is already past the end. –  Tony D Mar 29 '13 at 4:56
    
Tony D, that's why I noted that there's no bounds checking. –  Nathan Ernst Apr 2 '13 at 5:48
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Use scanf

scanf("$%lld", &price);

edit

See above reference. Quick and easy way to format input.

if(scanf("%lld %s $%lld #%lld",
  &id, name, &price, &quantity)!=4) fprintf(stderr, "error!");

Otherwise see other answers for more common/standard solutions.

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Note 1. this is c-style, 2. this isn't type-safe, 3. all of the above. but it's quick and dirty ;) –  jwalk Mar 29 '13 at 2:36
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If your implementation supports it, std::stoll.

Or this, again only if std::basic_istream::operator>>(long long&) is available:

long long i;
if (std::cin.get() == '$')
  std::cin >> i;
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read the docs for string http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/string/string/

there's a very obvious way to get a char* from a std::string in there

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