Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example, I have a function, let's say alert(). I want the function to also work if someone calls alert_user(), both having the same functionality. I imagine it to be something like this:

@synonym alert_user
def alert():
    print('hi!')

And it would work like this:

>>> alert()
hi!
>>> alert_user()
hi!

Is there such a thing?

share|improve this question
3  
I think this goes against Python's philosophy "There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it." –  Waleed Khan Mar 29 '13 at 2:43
1  
@WaleedKhan: That is true, but there can be legitimate reasons to do this (notably, if you make changes to an API but need to retain old names for backward compatibility during a transitional period, before the old names are removed). –  BrenBarn Mar 29 '13 at 2:45
1  
define alert_user like this : def alert_user():alert(). –  Ashwini Chaudhary Mar 29 '13 at 2:45

4 Answers 4

A decorator (as in your example) does not have access to the enclosing namespace, so it can't create a new name for the thing it decorates. However, it's easy to add an alias for your function:

def alert():
    print('hi!')
alert_user = alert
share|improve this answer
    
raw_input = input will make raw_input() available in Python 3. –  Santosh Kumar Mar 29 '13 at 3:53
    
If this is needed for some reason, this would be the best way to do it –  jamylak Mar 29 '13 at 7:10

This will give you what you want

def alert():
    print('hi!')

alert_user = alert

>>> alert()
hi!
>>> alert_user()
hi!
share|improve this answer

Function is the first level citizen in python. Just add alert_user = alert.

share|improve this answer

As stated above by fellow helpers you can define alert as a function then give alert a variable representation.

alert_user = alert

Thanks Ben

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.