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I remember reading an article about how Ruby doesn't really need DI or DI frameworks because the classes are open. As a result, you can simply rewrite a dependency's constructor so that it returns a fake object.

I'm very new to Clojure and functional programming. I'm wondering if Clojure needs dependency injection or it can forgo it for similar/other reasons. Here's a concrete example to work with (feel free how to point out how my design is non-idiomatic of Clojure):

Imagine you're developing a web crawler/spider. It needs to traverse a webpage you've downloaded. This is an action with side-effects. The webpage could change on every query, your internet connection could cut out, etc. It finds all the links on the webpage, visits each one, and then traverses it in the same way.

Now, you want to write a test that mocks out the http client so it returns a hard coded string response instead. How do you call the program's -main in a test and prevent it from using the real http client?

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See: stackoverflow.com/questions/13085370/… –  noahlz Mar 29 '13 at 3:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The with-redefs macro in clojure.core is very useful for stubbing out functions.

Here's a short REPL session to demonstrate this:

user=> (defn crawl [url]
  #_=>   ;; would now make http connection and download content
  #_=>   "data from the cloud")
#'user/crawl
user=> (defn -main [& args]
  #_=>   (crawl "http://www.google.com"))
#'user/-main
user=> (-main)
"data from the cloud"
user=> (with-redefs [crawl (fn [url] "fake data")]
  #_=>   (-main))
"fake data"

Since a Clojure program is composed (mostly) of functions, not objects, dynamic rebinding of functions replaces a good deal of what a DI framework would do for testing purposes.

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In Clojure you usually achieve the equivalent of dependency injection with alternative methods:

  • Dynamic binding - e.g. useful for redirecting standard output in test functions by doing (binding [*out* some-writer-object] ...)
  • Higher order functions - can be used to provide a form of dependency injection by passing other functions as parameters
  • Configuration with data - it's fairly idiomatic in Clojure to pass around maps which contain configuration parameters (or even functions to configure custom behaviour).

All of these are integral to the language itself. So you definitely don't need anything like a "DI framework". IMHO, needing a framework for DI is really just compensating for a lack of sufficient features in the language itself.

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Imagine you're developing a web crawler/spider. It needs to traverse a webpage you've downloaded. This is an action with side-effects. The webpage could change on every query, your internet connection could cut out, etc. It finds all the links on the webpage, visits each one, and then traverses it in the same way.

I don't see a need for dependency injection here. Here's how I think I'd tackle this problem whilst maintaining testability: separate out the implementation into a minimum of two functions. One function fetches and returns the webpage, and the other parses the response. In your main function, you'd have something like (-> "http://google.com" fetch parse).

Then, to test parse, you can simply bypass the fetch method and feed fake webpage data directly into the parse method.

(deftest test
     (is (= {:something "blah"} (parse "<html><head><title>Fake webpage etc..</title></head></html>"))))

So long as you're careful about breaking down problems into clear functions, I don't think you need anything sophisticated like DI to test.

I'm new to Clojure, so I'm not familiar with the macros and techniques mentioned by others in here, but the above methodology has served me fine thus far.

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1  
That's good advice and I think it's something I'd do, but I think that's more of a Unit test. Sometimes you need an Acceptance test that checks more than just a part. –  Daniel Kaplan Mar 29 '13 at 18:34

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