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For binary search tree type of data structures, I see the Big O notation is typically noted as O(logn). With a lowercase 'l' in log, does this imply log base e (n) as described by the natural logarithm? Sorry for the simple question but I've always had trouble distinguishing between the different implied logarithms.

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As others have cogently pointed out, it doesn't matter. All logarithms differ from each other by a constant only dependent on the bases involved. Because these factors are constants, they are irrelevant for the purposes of asymptotic analysis. Second, as far determining the implied base, it depends on context. As a rough rule of thumb use the following: 1. When a mathematician writes log n he means the natural logarithm. 2. When a computer scientist writes log n he means base-two. 3. When an engineer writes log n he means base-ten. These are usually true. –  Jason Oct 15 '09 at 1:50
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@Jason, another convention (within mathematics) is that ln n means the natural logarithm and log n is base ten. Think ln stands for the French 'logarithm naturelle'. –  Internet man Oct 20 '09 at 23:24
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The base of the logarithm is the number of children each node has. If it's a binary tree then it's a base 2 log. –  Paul Dec 4 '09 at 5:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Once expressed in big-O() notation, both are correct. However, during the derivation of the O() polynomial, in the case of binary search, only log2 is correct. I assume this distinction was the intuitive inspiration for your question to begin with.

Also, as a matter of my opinion, writing O(log2 N) is better for your example, because it better communicates the derivation of the algorithm's run-time.

In big-O() notation, constant factors are removed. Converting from one logarithm base to another involves multiplying by a constant factor.

So O(log N) is equivalent to O(log2 N) due to a constant factor.

However, if you can easily typeset log2 N in your answer, doing so is more pedagogical. In the case of binary tree searching, you are correct that log2 N is introduced during the derivation of the big-O() runtime.

Before expressing the result as big-O() notation, the difference is very important. When deriving the polynomial to be communicated via big-O notation, it would be incorrect for this example to use a logarithm other than log2 N, prior to applying the O()-notation. As soon as the polynomial is used to communicate a worst-case runtime via big-O() notation, it doesn't matter what logarithm is used.

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But it's very easy to show that log_2 n is in Θ(log_a n) for any base a, so I'm not sure I see how using base 2 is "more correct". –  bcat Oct 15 '09 at 0:34
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Kinopkio and bcat, thanks for helping it become useful. It was not very well-written at first. :) –  Heath Hunnicutt Oct 15 '09 at 1:04
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Well I added clarity but I sure am hurt that you think my answer might confuse people. Actually, most of the answers here didn't consider the OP's intuition and try to teach him much. I'm not so much wowed by the competition, I'm kind of sad at the low bar for pedagogy. –  Heath Hunnicutt Oct 15 '09 at 1:14
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"during the derivation of the O() polynomial, in the case of binary search, only log2 is correct." -1 for poor mathematics. The definition of x(n) ~ O(f(n)) says that there exists a constant c such that c*(f(n)) < x(n) for all n > n_0. Thus the constant coefficient is completely irrelevant during the analysis. –  rlbond Oct 15 '09 at 2:11
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Since log2(x) is equal to log10(x)/log10(2), you can derive it either way. The log is not strictly base 2 at any point. –  rlbond Feb 15 '10 at 4:00

Big O notation is not affected by logarithmic base, because all logarithms in different bases are related by a constant factor, O(ln n) is equivalent to O(log n)

log relation equation

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the graphics are neat but think about the derivation of the O()-polynomial... before O() is applied, only log-base-2 is correct for binary search. –  Heath Hunnicutt Oct 15 '09 at 0:57
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But why are you talking about that, when it bears no relation to the question and only serves to confuse? –  hobbs Oct 15 '09 at 1:06
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hobbs: Because that fact is the reason the OP was inspired to inquire. I'm trying to connect his ideas with the answer, so he understands why he had his intuition, why it does not apply to O(), but not to over-apply what he learns here to the derivation part of the analysis. The terse answers which don't address the root cause of the misunderstanding may lead to further misunderstanding. It's bad pedagogy. –  Heath Hunnicutt Oct 15 '09 at 1:16
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@Heath Hunnicutt: But the point is that it doesn't matter. –  Jason Oct 15 '09 at 1:34
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@Heath Hunnicutt: If you're doing asymptotic analysis, it doesn't matter. That you wait until the last minute to throw some big-O's in doesn't change the fact that I can multiply and divide all my logarithms by some silly constant and change the base at all steps. That is, if I have some analysis that involves log_2 n, I can just go in and replace log_2 n everywhere by log_pi 2 * log_2 n / log_pi 2 and then just end up with an analysis that has log_pi 2 * log_pi n everywhere. Now my analysis is in terms of log_pi n. –  Jason Oct 15 '09 at 1:49

It doesn't really matter what base it is, since big-O notation is usually written showing only the asymptotically highest order of n, so constant coefficients will drop away. Since a different logarithm base is equivalent to a constant coefficient, it is superfluous.

That said, I would probably assume log base 2.

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-1 That's wrong. –  user181548 Oct 15 '09 at 0:33
    
@Kinopiko: What exactly is wrong about it? More precisely, how is my answer factually different from yours and others here? –  Daniel Pryden Oct 15 '09 at 0:37
    
Ah, perhaps my mistake in the use of "coefficient". I will edit to clarify. –  Daniel Pryden Oct 15 '09 at 0:38
    
That was my main issue with your answer. Also, it's a bit unclear what you mean by "they will still have some effect". Some effect on what? –  bcat Oct 15 '09 at 0:39
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@Kinopiko: OK. I think we are saying the same thing. I would say O(100) = O(1) because O(100) = O(100 * 1) = O(C * 1) = O(1). Which is what I meant by constant expressions being superfluous. That is, the order of any constant is 1. –  Daniel Pryden Oct 15 '09 at 1:00

Technically the base doesn't matter, but you can generally think of it as base-2.

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Yes, when talking about big-O notation, the base does not matter. However, computationally when faced with a real search problem it does matter.

When developing an intuition about tree structures, it's helpful to understand that a binary search tree can be searched in O(n log n) time because that is the height of the tree - that is, in a binary tree with n nodes, the tree depth is O(n log n) (base 2). If each node has three children, the tree can still be searched in O(n log n) time, but with a base 3 logarithm. Computationally, the number of children each node has can have a big impact on performance (see for example: link text)

Enjoy!

Paul

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you meant to say that the height of a binary tree is log n, not n log n, right? –  cell Feb 24 '13 at 4:53

Both are correct. Think about this

log2(n)=log(n)/log(2)=O(log(n))
log10(n)=log(n)/log(10)=O(log(n))
logE(n)=log(n)/log(E)=O(log(n))
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