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I am new to programming C.. please tell me what is wrong with this program, and why I am getting this error: error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type'....

extern void func();

int main(int argc, char ** argv){
    func();
    int i=1;
    for(;i<=5; i++) {
        register int number = 7;
        printf("number is %d\n", number++);
    }
    getch();
}
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1  
I haven't used visual in at least 8 years, but does Visual's limited C compiler support allow mixed code and variables? Is the line of the error on the declaration for int i=1; ?? Try moving it above the call to func(); Also, I would use extern void func(void); – Randy Howard Mar 29 '13 at 4:14
    
You're not showing the full code. The snipped in question is fine and should not produce any syntax errors. – Ionic Mar 29 '13 at 4:16
1  
@RandyHoward: I believe that's the problem: Visual C doesn't permit mixing declarations and statements, a feature added to C by the 1999 ISO standard, which Visual Studio doesn't support. You should post that as an answer. – Keith Thompson Mar 29 '13 at 4:16
1  
@RandyHoward: Not returning a value from main() isn't illegal. In C89/C90, it returns a undefined status to the environment. In C99, it's equivalent to return 0;. – Keith Thompson Mar 29 '13 at 4:20
1  
It would be clearer to do the initial assignment to i in the for loop: int i; for (i = 1; i <= 5; i ++) .... (You could declare it there as well if MS supported C99.) – Keith Thompson Mar 29 '13 at 4:21
up vote 16 down vote accepted

I haven't used visual in at least 8 years, but it seems that Visual's limited C compiler support does not allow mixed code and variables. Is the line of the error on the declaration for int i=1; ?? Try moving it above the call to func();

Also, I would use extern void func(void);

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Visual Studio only supports C89. That means that all of your variables must be declared before anything else at the top of a function.

EDIT: @KeithThompson prodded me to add a more technically accurate description (and really just correct where mine is not in one regard). All declarations (of variables or of anything else) must precede all statements within a block.

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2  
Actually it means that all declarations (of variables or of anything else) must precede all statements within a block. – Keith Thompson Mar 29 '13 at 4:18
1  
@KeithThompson: Definitely a more technically correct response. – Ed S. Mar 29 '13 at 4:19
    
The best kind of correct! 8-)} – Keith Thompson Mar 29 '13 at 4:21
    
@KeithThompson: True true – Ed S. Mar 29 '13 at 4:21

this:

int i=1;
for(;i<=5; i++) {

should be idiomatically written as:

for(int i=1; i<=5; i++) {

because there no point to declare for loop variable in the function scope.

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@EdS. this way the variable is declared in the for block and this should fix his problem. – lenik Mar 29 '13 at 4:20
1  
That syntax is only valid in C++ and C99, not in C89. Visual Studio only supports the C89 dialect of C. – Adam Rosenfield Mar 29 '13 at 4:21
    
@AdamRosenfield i've used this syntax in VS2003, should not have changed much since then. – lenik Mar 29 '13 at 4:22
    
@AdamRosenfield: And even if it were VS did support C99, that wouldn't answer the OP's question. That part of the code could be improved, but it's perfectly legal in all versions of C. – Keith Thompson Mar 29 '13 at 4:23
1  
@lenik: Visual Studio supports both C and C++ (and seems to prefer C++). The C++ support is pretty good, which means you can declare variables in for loop headers and mix declarations and statements in C++. If you compile your code as C (by naming your file with a .c extension), it only supports the 1989/1990 C standard (with a very few extensions such as // comments, I think) -- which means you can't use even feature that exist in both C99 and C++. – Keith Thompson Mar 29 '13 at 4:25

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