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I have a problem that i've been trying to solve for days. I was wondering if it was possible to let a text turn into an integer. So everytime i write in my textarea("ALC") Load, then on the textarea("MLC") 001. And also including 1-15 to binary at the end E.g. Load #1 will show 001 0 00001

<html>
<head>
<center><font size ="24"> Simple Assembler </font></center>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var Load = "001";
    var Store = "010";
    var Add = "011";
    var Sub = "100";
    var Equal = "101";
    var Jump = "110";
    var Halt = "111";
    var # = "1";


</script>
</head>
<body>

<form name="AssemblyLanguagecode" action="" method="">
<textarea Id="ALC" style="resize:none;width:35%;height:35%;margin-left:15%" value="">Insert Assembly Language Code</textarea>
<textarea Id="MLC" style="resize:none;width:35%;height:35%;" ReadOnly="True">Machine Language Code will be displayed here</textarea><br  />
<p align="center"><input type="button" value="Assemble" onclick="ALCtoMLC()";" /></p>
</form>


<script type= "text/javascript">

function ALCtoMLC() {   
    var x = document.getElementById("ALC").value;
    x = parseInt(x);
    var bin = x.toString(2);



document.getElementById("MLC").innerHTML = bin;
}

</script>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
The problem is that i also want to convert the text into specific numbers. So whenever i type in the first text area it will pop up in the next area showing the number. E.g. states above Load = "001" So if i wrote Load 15 the box on the right will show = 001 1111 –  user2220070 Mar 29 '13 at 4:18
    
if you can give a fair example of ALC input (without output) is would be great. for example - is it #Load(15) or Load#15 and so on.. What you are asking is a parser. Once you get the tokens, your job is practically done. –  guy mograbi Mar 29 '13 at 4:26
1  
ALC input would be Load #15 and the output would be 001 0 1111 –  user2220070 Mar 29 '13 at 4:29
    
The question is inconsistent. Either Load is 001 or 010.. can't be both. If you want 4 bits it should be 0001 or 0010 but can't be both. I've never seen padding with 0 in the end, it modified the number and is very bad practice. –  guy mograbi Mar 29 '13 at 4:59
    
@guymograbi - I don't see how it's inconsistent. The fourth bit is always set to 0. Read the question carefully. –  Aadit M Shah Mar 29 '13 at 5:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Updated:

Try this:

<html>
<head>
<center><font size ="24"> Simple Assembler </font></center>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var Load = "001";
    var Store = "010";
    var Add = "011";
    var Sub = "100";
    var Equal = "101";
    var Jump = "110";
    var Halt = "111";
    var # = "1";



</script>
</head>
<body>

<form name="AssemblyLanguagecode" action="" method="">
<textarea Id="ALC" style="resize:none;width:35%;height:35%;margin-left:15%" value="">Insert Assembly Language Code</textarea>
<textarea Id="MLC" style="resize:none;width:35%;height:35%;" ReadOnly="True">Machine Language Code will be displayed here</textarea><br  />
<p align="center"><input type="button" value="Assemble" onclick="ALCtoMLC();" /></p>
</form>


<script type= "text/javascript">
var Dict = { 'Load':"001",'Store':"010"}; //example Instruction set

function ALCtoMLC() {   
    var x = document.getElementById("ALC").value;
    var instrType = '';
    for (var instr in Dict){
        var ind = x.indexOf(instr);
        if( ind > -1){
            instrType = instrType + Dict[instr];
            x = x.replace(instr,'');
        }
    }
    console.log(instrType, "::", x);
    x = parseInt(x);
    var bin = x.toString(2);
    bin = instrType + bin; 
    document.getElementById("MLC").innerHTML = bin;
}

</script>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Ohh thanks heaps man!! I appreciate it –  user2220070 Mar 29 '13 at 4:52
    
What if i wanted to include multi line, as in if i wrote Load, Store on the input side underneath each other, the opposite side would print underneath each other as well. –  user2220070 Mar 29 '13 at 5:07
    
@user2220070: Have to write some extra lines for formatting. And most likely change the earlier approach for reading. Because most of the cases the lines will be like this right? Load register data , Store register data. So each and every line should be read and their respective data should be populated in the right hand side –  karthick Mar 29 '13 at 5:14
    
@user2220070: If i get time, I will update the code. –  karthick Mar 29 '13 at 5:17
    
All lines will only have one opcode in each line, maybe i should of stated that earlier. –  user2220070 Mar 29 '13 at 5:18

I think I understand what you want to do. You want to use what you type into "ALC" as a key to a value. In that case, you want to use a javascript object and assign the instructions as keys, and the binary to the value. Such as

var instruction_set = {
    "Load" : "001",
    "Store" : "010",
    "Add" : "011",
    "Sub" : "100",
    "Equal" : "101",
    "Jump" : "110",
    "Halt" : "111"
}

function ALCtoMLC() {
    var x = document.getElementById("ALC").value;
    x = instruction_set[x];
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I think they also want to be able to use multiple words in the input and have the words translated to multiple numbers, e.g., Load Store would become 001 010. –  icktoofay Mar 29 '13 at 4:27
    
I think what they want to do is to have a number coverted to binary appended to it, to make one byte. So one procedure would be "Load 15", which would convert to "00101111". This is common instruction set architecture. –  MattDiamant Mar 29 '13 at 4:36
    
Thanks Matt, but im facing a problem that when i type in Load it will show up [object Object]001 –  user2220070 Mar 29 '13 at 4:39
    
Looks like you're on the right track. It looks like you're trying to add 001 to an object. Can you post the code you've got now (preferably in a jsfiddle), or update the original question with your progress? –  MattDiamant Mar 29 '13 at 4:44

Lets say you have a way to get the tokens. Then your function should look like this

var tokens = getTokens( document.getElementById("ALC").value ) ;
var vocabulary = { "Load" : "001" , " ... " } ;
var output = []
var i = 0;
var tokensLength = tokens.length;
for ( ; i < tokensLength; i++){
     var token = tokens[i];
     if ( isNaN(token) && typeof(vocabulary[token]) != "undefined" ){
           output.push( vocabulary[token] );

     }else if ( !isNaN(token) ){
          output.push( Number(token).toString(2) );
     }else{
          console.log(["error : unknown token ", token]);
     }
}

document.getElementById("MLC").value = output.join(" "); 

I see in the question that Load translates to 0010 and not 001, so I would simply modify the vocabulary.

Explanation :

  • I assume you have a way to split the input to tokens. (the ALC syntax is still unclear to me).
  • The tokens array will contains, for example ["Load","#","15", "Load","#","16"] and so on.
  • Then I loop on the tokens.
  • If a token is a number - I turn it to binary string.
  • If the token is translatable by vocabulary - I switch it to its binary representation.
  • Otherwise I print an error.

NOTE: if output should be padded with "0" - even though it is not specified in the question, I would use "0000".substring(n.length) + n

share|improve this answer
    
TLDR - more explanations please. –  Aadit M Shah Mar 29 '13 at 4:46

This is how I would do it:

var opcodes = {
    Load:  1,
    Store: 2,
    Add:   3,
    Sub:   4,
    Equal: 5,
    Jump:  6,
    Halt:  7
};

var assemblyTextarea = document.querySelector("#assembly");
var machineTextarea = document.querySelector("#machine");

document.querySelector("#assemble").addEventListener("click", function () {
    var instruction = assemblyTextarea.value.split(" ");
    var operand =+ instruction[1].slice(1);
    var opcode = instruction[0];

    var code = opcodes[opcode] * 16 + operand;
    var bits = ("0000000" + code.toString(2)).slice(-8);

    machineTextarea.value = bits;
}, false);

See the demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/fs5mb/1/

The input should be formatted as follows: Load #15

share|improve this answer
    
Any reason why you are using document.querySelector instead of document.getElementById ? –  karthick Mar 29 '13 at 4:54
    
This is close, but you don't need to slice off when declaring the operand. I was getting correct machine code after this. –  MattDiamant Mar 29 '13 at 4:54
    
@karthick - I'm lazy. –  Aadit M Shah Mar 29 '13 at 4:55
    
@MattDiamant - The input should be something like Load #15. I'm using slice to remove the #. –  Aadit M Shah Mar 29 '13 at 4:55
1  
@karthick because querySelector rules? No one cares about IE7. –  MattDiamant Mar 29 '13 at 4:56

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