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Can someone please explain to me the life cycle of a variable from a namespace? Let's say I have the following files:

file.h:

// ...
namespace variables{
    int x, y;
}

file.cpp:

#include "file.h"
using namespace variables;

int main(){
    ...
}

What are the scopes of x and y? I ask because, in a book I was reading (C++ Primer Plus), the author recommends using namespaces inside functions, and so I thought that they are defined at the point of the using command. However, when I do this:

B.h:

class B{
     // class stuff
};

namespace variables{
    int x, y;
}

and then in main.cpp (main program) and B.cpp (class implementation) I add the #include "B.h" line, I get an error that I have multiple definitions of variables::x and variables::y, even though there is no using in any file. What's the deal? Am I mixing up two different concepts?

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Defining variables in your header file isn't such a hot idea, for starters. –  WhozCraig Mar 29 '13 at 5:02
    
That actually was my question. I was asking where the definition happens. –  naxchange Mar 29 '13 at 5:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you directly declare variables in a namespace just like you did, they will simply exist as global variables.

Thus, the rules that apply for normal global variables also apply for those ones : they will exist for as long as the program run, and you should not define them in a header file.

include.h

namespace Variables
{
    extern int x;
    extern int y;
}

file.cpp

namespace Variables
{
    int x;
    int y;
}

Writing using namespace Variables will simply allow you to access those variables by their name x and y, without having to prefix them with Variables::

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Namespace has no influence on variable's lifespan, so:

namespace variables{
    int x, y;
}

#include "file.h"
using namespace variables;

int main(){
    ...
}

What are the scopes of x and y?

These variables are global, so their life time equals to life time of the entire application.

Remember, that using namespace is simply a shortcut to writing NamespaceName:: in front of elements from this namespace.

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I add the #include "B.h" line, I get an error that I have multiple definitions of variables::x and variables::y, even though there is no using in any file. What's the deal? Am I mixing up two different concepts?

Your variables are declared even if you do not explicitly import the namespace. The keyword using import namespaces or specific names within the current scope so that you don't have to prepend X:: to access a defined element.

The life span of a variable is not affected by namespaces.

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