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I'm reading this - http://learn.jquery.com/javascript-101/this-keyword/ but there is an example I don't quite understand.

// A function being attached to an object at runtime.
var myName = "the global object";
var sayHello = function() {
    console.log( "Hi! My name is " + this.myName );
};
var myObject = {
    myName: "Rebecca"
};
var secondObject = {
    myName: "Colin"
};

myObject.sayHello = sayHello;
secondObject.sayHello = sayHello;

sayHello();              // "Hi! My name is the global object"
myObject.sayHello();     // "Hi! My name is Rebecca"
secondObject.sayHello(); // "Hi! My name is Colin"

I understand it all, except this two lines:

myObject.sayHello = sayHello;
secondObject.sayHello = sayHello;

What exactly do we do with them? We create new keys to the objects and state that their values will be the function sayHello, but we omit the parenthesis in order not to explicitly call the function? And why do we need them? If we omit them, won't we get the same result and won't it be again "a function being attached to an object at runtime"?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

We create new keys to the objects and state that their values will be the function sayHello,

Yes

but we omit the parenthesis in order not to explicitly call the function?

Yes. If you called the function then you would assign the return value of the function call instead of the function itself.

If we omit them, won't we get the same result

If you omit those two lines, then myObject.sayHello will be undefined and you will get an error when you try to call undefined().

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Thank you very much! So we can't call a function to an object if we don't previously add a new key with this function to the object? –  Faery Mar 29 '13 at 7:40
1  
call, apply and bind provide ways to call a function in the context of an object without fire making it a method on the object, but to call one as a method it must be the value of a property on the object. –  Quentin Mar 29 '13 at 7:42
    
Thanks! I will read about call, apply and bind, too. :) –  Faery Mar 29 '13 at 7:47
var sayHello = function() {
    ...
};
myObject.sayHello = sayHello;

is the same as:

var myObject = {
    myName: "Rebecca",
    sayHello: function() {
        ...
    }
};
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What is happening is that you point myObject.sayHello to the sayHello function (and you omit the parenthesis, otherwise you would assign the result of the called function). Whenever you call the sayHello function, the this will be the object of which you call sayHello.

So for myObject.sayHello, the this will be myObject.

For simply calling sayHello, what you actually do is calling window.sayHello, so this is set to window.

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