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I created the following code just now to help debug a C project we have to write that basically is eventually supposed to emulate a UNIX file system. I've been pulling my hairs out trying to figure out why two seemingly identical blocks of code produce different output. When I simulate the same behavior that my function mkfs() is supposed to have by typing the same lines of code in the main() file, it works perfectly, but when I try to use the function (literally the same lines of code!!!!!!), it simply says RUN FAILED. When I execute the code inside my main() function that is currently commented out, it works great and indeed prints "/" to the console, but when I try to create a pointer to a filesystem, call mkfs() on it, then print out the same string, it just doesn't work.

I must be not understanding something. Here is the code, but if you prefer syntax highlighting then here is a little link to pastebin: http://pastebin.com/9yCB1iND

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct directory {
    const char *name;
    struct file *f;
    struct directory *dir;
} Directory;

typedef struct file {
    const char *name;
    struct file *next;
    struct file *prev;
    Directory *parent;
} File;

typedef struct filesystem {
    Directory *rt;
    Directory *cd;
} Filesystem;

/* The function mkfs() initializes the Filesystem. It takes a pointer to a 
 * filesystem as its single parameter and allocates the memory needed ( it 
 * allocates the space needed to accomodate the two Directory pointers 
 * that a filesystem has). */
    void mkfs(Filesystem *files){

    /*The first malloc creates enough space for Filesystem itself*/
    files = malloc(sizeof(Filesystem));

    /*The second malloc creates enough space for a root Directory*/
    files->rt = malloc(sizeof(Directory));

    /*We make a character array with a single slash that represents root*/
    char nv[] = "/";
    /* nv is a pointer to the first element in the array nv[]. 
     * We point 'files->rt->name' to the first character in the array nv[]. */
    files->rt->name = nv;
    /* Finally, we set files->cd to point to whatever files->rt pointed too, 
     * which is the current directory "/" */
    files->cd = files->rt;
}


int main(void) {
    /*
    Filesystem *files;
    files = malloc(sizeof(Filesystem));
    files->rt = malloc(sizeof(Directory));
    char nv[] = "/";
    files->rt->name = nv;
    files->cd = files->rt;
    printf("%s", files->cd->name);

        ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Why does the FOLLOWING code not work when the ABOVE code should be "the same" ?
        ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    */

    Filesystem *f;
    mkfs(f);
    printf("%s", f->cd->name);

    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In mkfs function:

char nv[] = "/";
files->rt->name = nv;

nv is an array with automatic storage duration, lifetime of which ends when the execution goes out of the scope of this function making files->rt->name becoming dangling pointer, dereferencing of which leads to undefined behavior. You need to allocate files->rt->name dynamically.

Also note that mkfs function takes pointer to Filesystem, which is just a copy of the pointer passed to it. Changes made to the pointer itself are not visible to the caller, which means that when you call printf("%s", f->cd->name);, you are dereferencing uninitialized pointer, which also leads to undefined behavior. If you want mkfs to allocate the memory and initialize your pointer correctly, then you should pass an address of this pointer:

void mkfs(Filesystem **files) {
    *files = malloc(sizeof(Filesystem));
    (*files)->rt = malloc(sizeof(Directory));
    char nv[] = "/";
    (*files)->rt->name = malloc(strlen(nv) + 1);
    strcpy((*files)->rt->name, nv);
    (*files)->cd = (*files)->rt;
}

int main(void) {
    Filesystem *f = NULL;  // <-- it's good to keep your variables initialized
    mkfs(&f);
    ...
}

And in case you don't need your function to make changes to the memory this pointer points to, but not to the pointer itself, it could look like this:

void mkfs(Filesystem *files) {
    files->rt = malloc(sizeof(Directory));
    char nv[] = "/";
    files->rt->name = malloc(strlen(nv) + 1);
    strcpy(files->rt->name, nv);
    (*files)->cd = files->rt;
}

int main(void) {
    Filesystem *f;
    f = malloc(sizeof(Filesystem));
    mkfs(f);
    ...
}
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So if I made nv a global variable just so that I can initially name the first directory created "/", that should fix the dangling pointer issue right? But then allocating files->rt->name dynamically just means using malloc(sizeof("/")), right? I just want to make sure I understand what you mean. Thanks –  Herald D. Precursor Mar 29 '13 at 9:09
    
Right that definitely makes sense, just like how in order to make a linked list be able to work without head pointing to anything initially, you must pass a pointer to a pointer to a Node in order to be able to directly modify what the first pointer is pointing to. However, the function declarations we were given state that we must simply use void mkfs(Filesystem *files) and not a double pointer, but I guess I could make a helper function to get around that –  Herald D. Precursor Mar 29 '13 at 9:12
    
@HeraldD.Precursor: Check the code in my answer now. I edited it :) –  LihO Mar 29 '13 at 9:16
    
Wow thanks so much, it makes no sense to me why his function prototypes would look this:pastebin.com/XULyjzzS –  Herald D. Precursor Mar 29 '13 at 9:22
    
Could I just get around this by making the Filesystem a pointer? Like the logic of it makes perfect sense, you want to actually modify what you are pointing to so you pass in the address of that pointer itself since in C everything is passed by value and copies are made. Would making the Filesystem type a pointer (if possible) allow the function prototype mkfs(Filesystem *files) to work? I really appreciate the assistance, I am going to continue to try and look at more examples of structures containing pointers to other structures in order to understand better. Once again thanks. –  Herald D. Precursor Mar 29 '13 at 9:25
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When you make a call like this

mkfs(f);

A copy of f is passed to mkfs. That copy is the one which is changed (i.e the return value of malloc is used to initialize that copy. However, the f in main is not changed.

Hence when you do

printf("%s", f->cd->name); 

in main - it's undefined behaviour because you are accessing an uninitialized pointer.

There are also other problems in your program

Your nv is local to the function. It's life is only till the function returns. So that's wrong.

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