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I have two functions like below,

func1 = function(){
    console.log("func1 is called"); 
}

func2 = function(){
    console.log("func2 is called");
    setTimeout(func1(),10000) 
}

When I make a call like func2(). I get the output but not the expected one.As you can see I have used a setTimeout() in func2 and I expect some delay as specified before func1 gets executed.

But no delay is observed both the lines gets printed to console at the same time. What am I doing wrong here or am I missing anything? Please help..

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marked as duplicate by Andy E, jahroy, JJPA, Sirko, Dimitri M Mar 4 '14 at 7:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When referencing a function, you need to leave off the brackets.

setTimeout(func1,10000);
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Thanks a lot Andy. –  JJPA Mar 29 '13 at 9:08

You could also specify an anonymous function :

setTimeout(function(){func1();},10000);
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2  
This is not needed, leaving the parentheses does the trick aswell. And is more readable then a anonymous function. –  RvdK Mar 29 '13 at 9:05
    
Yes, you are both right, but it is also a valid solution. –  sdespont Mar 29 '13 at 9:06
2  
But still a redundant one in this case; there's no gain unless you want to pass arguments to the function. –  Andy E Mar 29 '13 at 9:10
    
@sdespont +1 thanks a lot.. –  JJPA Mar 29 '13 at 9:12
1  
@sdespont: I don't mean to offend, and in certain scenarios I may agree with you, but your answer promotes a somewhat poor practice of adding unnecessary bulk and inefficiencies to code. –  Andy E Mar 29 '13 at 9:22

Remove the parentheses after func1 in your call to setTimeout.

The setTimeout function expects a function reference.

Your code passes the result of invoking func1 to setTimeout() after printing an alert.

When parentheses follow the name of a function, they cause the function to be invoked.

func1 = function () {
    alert('func1 is called');
}

func2 = function(){
    console.log("func2 is called");
    // Invoke func1 and pass the return value (which is undefined) to setTimeout.  
    // An alert will be displayed immediately when func1 is invoked.
    setTimeout(func1(),10000) 
}

func2 = function(){
    console.log("func2 is called");
    // Pass a reference to func1 to setTimeout to be invoked later.
    setTimeout(func1,10000) 
}
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+1 thank you very much –  JJPA Mar 29 '13 at 9:12

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