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I'm not so good at both Linq and SQL. But I have worked more with SQL and less with LINQ. I've gone through many articles which favors LINQ. I don't want to go the SQL way (i.e. writing stored procedures and operating data etc.)

I want to start with LINQ for every operation related with data. Here are the reasons why I want to do this:

  1. I want to have complete control of my database via application and not by writing stored procs (as I'm not so good at writing store procedure)
  2. I want to create my project as an easy maintainability view
  3. Want faster development

For that, I know that:

  1. I need to add a dbml file, drag and drop tables into that
  2. Use dbContext class, and so on

But I want to know, is there a way:

  1. I can avoid creating dbml file and still be able to access the database?
  2. Do I need to use Linq to Entities for the same?
  3. Will it be a good way to avoid using dbml file? Since for every database changes I need to drop and drop tables every time
  4. Also I've come across many posts where linqToSql is considered deprecated and not a .net future?

I have so many doubts, but I think that's obvious when starting with a new technology?

I found this useful article which is good for beginners:

[http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2010/08/03/using-ef-code-first-with-an-existing-database.aspx][1]

after doing some more research I came to conclusion that:

1)i can avoid creating dbml file and still be able to access database??

ANS Yes but instead of dbml now edmx files will be created.

2)Do I need to use Linq to Entities for the same?

ANS Yes you can go with linq to entities.

3)Will it be good way avoid using dbml file? since for every database changes I need to drop and drop tables every time

ANS it is not required to drop and create again the tables. their are options where you can update selected part of your database and you are not avoiding dbmls. it will created edmx file and that will almost similar to dbmls in many ways.

4) Also I've come across many posts where linqToSql is considered deprecated and not a .net future?

ANS yes in future development it will be depreciated. it supports only sql server as backend.

I hope I'm right. Please do tell me in case any other suggestions.

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1 Answer 1

LINQ is a way to query and project collection of data. For example, you can use LINQ to query and shape data from a database or from an array. LINQ by it self has nothing to with the under lying database.

You use an ORM (Object Relational Mapper) technology to project data stored in tables of a database as collections of objects. Once you have the collection of objects, you can use LINQ to query them.

Now, you have many ORM technologies to select from, such as Entity Framework, NHibernate, Linq2Sql. If you don’t like to maintain a dbml file, have a look at code first approach offered by Entity Framework.

Then there are things called LINQ data providers. They would take a LINQ query, transform it to a SQL targeting a particular database, execute the query and get the results back as a set of objects. Many of the ORMs above has built in LINQ data providers as a part of them and would work behind the scene in fetching the data.

I would advise you to look up on some patterns such Repository and Unit of work for your data layer. When used correctly, these patterns will isolate your data access code from your applications upper layers. This will help you to change your data access technology is it becomes obsolete, without affecting the rest of the application.

LINQ is an awesome technology and you should definitely try it

I have composed the above answer based on my own experience and I am sure there are many SO users with better understanding of the above technologies than myself who may wish to add their own opinion

Good luck

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