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After reading this blog at planetcassandra, I'm wondering how does a CQL3 composite index with 3 fields map in the thrift column family word, For e.g.:

CREATE TABLE comments (
        article_id uuid,
        posted_at timestamp,       
        author text,
        karma int,
        content text,
        PRIMARY KEY (article_id, posted_at)
    )

Here the column article_id will be mapped to the internal row key and posted_at will be mapped to (the first part of) the cell name.

What if the table design will be

CREATE TABLE comments (
        author_id varchar,
        posted_at timestamp,
        article_id uuid,       
        author text,
        karma int,
        content text,
        PRIMARY KEY (author_id, posted_at, article_id)
    )
  1. And will the internal row key mapped to 1st 2 fields of the composite index with article_id mapped to cell name, essentially slicing for as many articles upto 2 billion entries and any query on author_id and posted_at combination is one seek on the disk?
  2. Is the behavior same for any number of fields in a composite key?

Your answers much appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

The above observation is incorrect and the correct one is here

I've personally verified:

In the first case:
article_id = partition key, posted_at = cluster key

In the second case:
author_id  = partition key, posted_at:article_id = cluster key
  1. First part of composite key (author_id) is called "Partition Key", rest (posted_at,article_id) are remaining keys.
  2. Cassandra stores columns differently when composite keys are used. Partition key becomes row key. Remaining keys are concatenated with each column name (":" as separator) to form column names. Column values remain unchanged.
  3. Remaining keys (other than partition keys) are ordered, and it's not allowed to search on any random column, you have to start with the first one and then you can move to the second one and so on. This is evident from "Bad Request" error.
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There's an excellent explanation by Aaron Morton @ his site thelastpickle.

In the first case:
article_id = partition key, posted_at = cluster key

In the second case:
author_id + posted_at = partition key, article_id = cluster key

hence be mindful of the disk seeks as you go by second method and see the row is not getting too wide and gives real benefit compared to the first case. If you aren't crossing the 2 billion and well within the limits, don't overdo by adopting the 2nd method, as the dispersion of records happens on the combo key.

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