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I'm implementing a function which returns a Stream. I'm not sure how to implement the error handling, what is best practice?

For functions which return a Future, it's best practice never to throw a synchronous error. Is this also true for functions which return a Stream?

Here's an example of what I'm thinking:

Stream<int> count() {
   var controller = new StreamController<int>();
   int i = 0;
   try {
     doSomethingThatMightThrow();
     new Timer.repeating(new Duration(seconds: 1), () => controller.add(i++));
   } on Exception catch (e) {
     controller.addError(e);
     controller.close();
   }
   return controller.stream;
}
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

In general it is true for Streams as well. The main idea is, that users should only need to handle errors in one way. Your example moves all errors to the stream.

There are circumstances where immediate errors are better (for instance you could make the error is due to a programming error and should never be handled anyways, or if you want to guarantee that a Stream never produces errors), but sending the error through a stream is almost always a good thing.

Small nit: a Stream should usually (there are exceptions) not produce any data until somebody has started listening. In your example you are starting a Timer even though you don't even know if there will ever be a listener. I'm guessing the example is reduced and not representative of your real code, but it is something to look out for. The solution would be to use the StreamController's callbacks for pause and subscription changes.

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Thanks, Florian. The hint about the nit is helpful. Often I'll be getting a stream of data and transforming and passing it on. If there are no listeners, I should just swallow all of the data and not pass it on. Interesting. – Greg Lowe Mar 29 '13 at 20:34
    
No. You shouldn't swallow the data. You should delay listening on the incoming stream, until someone starts listening on your Stream. If you are transforming a Stream, try to think of it as if it was a Subscription transformation. Instead of providing the original subscription you provide a modified subscription that transforms the data. – Florian Loitsch Mar 30 '13 at 14:41
    
Hmmm. For my use case I don't think that makes sense. I am returning results from a database query. If the user doesn't listen to the results of a query, I'd rather the results be discarded than sit around in a buffer for ever. Ideally, the end user should call exec(), rather than query(). But it would nice to do the right thing, even when the end user doesn't. I'm not sure about this. I will think about it some more. – Greg Lowe Mar 30 '13 at 22:27
    
Streams are used in many places, and as such there are exceptions to this "rule". With this in mind: you were saying that your data comes from another Stream. This stream should not produce data until someone starts listening to it (same rule). If you delay listening to the incoming stream (the one given by the database) until someone starts listening to your stream you should be fine. – Florian Loitsch Mar 31 '13 at 0:01
    
The original stream is a socket I can't delay it without buffering. – Greg Lowe Mar 31 '13 at 6:04

I've updated the example to take on-board Florian's comments.

In my real use case, I don't ever want to buffer the results, so I'm throwing an UnsupportedError if the stream is paused.

I've made it a terminating stream, rather than an infinite one.

If the user of this function adds a listener asynchronously after a few seconds, then they will lose the first couple of results. They shouldn't do this. I guess that's something to document clearly. Though perhaps, I could also throw an error if the subscribe state changes after the first data has been received, but before a close has been received.

Stream<int> count(int max) {
   var controller = new StreamController<int>(
           onPauseStateChange: () => throw new UnsupportedError('count() Stream pausing not supported.'));
   int i = 0;
   try {
     doSomethingThatMightThrow();
     new Timer.repeating(new Duration(seconds: 1), () {
        if (!controller.hasSubscribers)
           return;
        controller.add(i++);
        if (i >= max)
           controller.close();
     });
   } on Exception catch (e) {
     controller.addError(e);
     controller.close();
   }
   return controller.stream;
}
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