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According to the following two clauses from the C99 standard:

6.2.5-9

The range of nonnegative values of a signed integer type is a subrange of the corresponding unsigned integer type, and the representation of the same value in each type is the same.

6.2.6.2-2

For signed integer types, the bits of the object representation shall be divided into three groups: value bits, padding bits, and the sign bit. There need not be any padding bits; there shall be exactly one sign bit. Each bit that is a value bit shall have the same value as the same bit in the object representation of the corresponding unsigned type (if there are M value bits in the signed type and N in the unsigned type, then M ≤ N ).

It is (probably) possible for a signed type to represent all numbers representable by the corresponding unsigned type. For example, if the unsigned int type is represented using 31 value bits and 1 padding bit and the signed int is represented using 31 value bits and no padding bits.

Is an implementation allowed to do so? If yes, does that mean that an unsigned int will be promoted to an int in such a case (since both types have the same conversion rank and int can represent all values that unsigned int represents)?

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You cannot get a quart into a pint bottle - It is an idiom but true –  Ed Heal Mar 29 '13 at 10:41

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It is (probably) possible for a signed type to represent all numbers representable by the corresponding unsigned type. For example, if the unsigned int type is represented using 31 value bits and 1 padding bit and the signed int is represented using 31 value bits and no padding bits. Is an implementation allowed to do so?

The standard establishes in 6.3.1.8 Usual arithmetic conversions:

Otherwise, the integer promotions are performed on both operands. Then the following rules are applied to the promoted operands: If both operands have the same type, then no further conversion is needed.

Otherwise, if both operands have signed integer types or both have unsigned integer types, the operand with the type of lesser integer conversion rank is converted to the type of the operand with greater rank.

Otherwise, if the operand that has unsigned integer type has rank greater or equal to the rank of the type of the other operand, then the operand with signed integer type is converted to the type of the operand with unsigned integer type.

Since int and unsigned int are of the same rank (6.3.1.1 Boolean, characters, and integers), int will convert into unsigned int, but not the other way around:

— The rank of any unsigned integer type shall equal the rank of the corresponding signed integer type, if any.

Integer constants suffixed with u are always unsigned (see the table in 6.4.4.1 Integer constants).

6.3.1.1 Boolean, characters, and integers clause 2 also tells us:

The following may be used in an expression wherever an int or unsigned int may be used:

— An object or expression with an integer type whose integer conversion rank is less than the rank of int and unsigned int.

— A bit-field of type _Bool, int, signed int, or unsigned int.

If an int can represent all values of the original type, the value is converted to an int; otherwise, it is converted to an unsigned int. These are called the integer promotions. All other types are unchanged by the integer promotions.

So, no, an implementation cannot legally convert unsigned int into int, unless you ask for that explicitly by way of casting or assignment.

EDIT: Clause 2 of 6.3.1.1 Boolean, characters, and integers reads as:

— An object or expression with an integer type whose integer conversion rank is less than the rank of int and unsigned int.

(INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/IEC 9899 Second edition 1999-12-01)

— An object or expression with an integer type whose integer conversion rank is less than or equal to the rank of int and unsigned int.

(WG14/N1256 Committee Draft — Septermber 7, 2007 ISO/IEC 9899:TC3)

— An object or expression with an integer type (other than int or unsigned int) whose integer conversion rank is less than or equal to the rank of int and unsigned int.

(N1548 Committee Draft — December 2, 2010 ISO/IEC 9899:201x,
N1570 Committee Draft — April 12, 2011 ISO/IEC 9899:201x)

And just for fun, C++11's 4.5 Integral promotions [conv.prom]:

A prvalue of an integer type other than bool, char16_t, char32_t, or wchar_t whose integer conversion rank (4.13) is less than the rank of int can be converted to a prvalue of type int if int can represent all the values of the source type; otherwise, the source prvalue can be converted to a prvalue of type unsigned int.

(N3242=11-0012,
N3337 Date: 2012-01-16,
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/IEC 14882 Third edition 2011-09-01)

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Won't the integer promotions go first? "the integer promotions are performed on both operands. Then the following rules are applied to the promoted operands:" –  Alexandros Mar 29 '13 at 11:10
    
But those promotions apply to types smaller in rank than int, to all kinds of short and char and to bitfields. They do not apply to unsigned int. See clause 2 of 6.3.1.1 Boolean, characters, and integers. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 29 '13 at 11:16
    
The integer conversion rank doesn't have to be strictly smaller: "An object or expression with an integer type whose integer conversion rank is less than or equal to the rank of int and unsigned int". –  Alexandros Mar 29 '13 at 11:19
    
@AlexeyFrunze But those promotions apply to types smaller in rank actually the rank has to be less than or equal see 6.3.1.1p2. –  ouah Mar 29 '13 at 11:22
    
@Alexandros - the wording makes it clear this refers only to different types. –  teppic Mar 29 '13 at 11:23

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