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I parse a string into a DateTime millions of times:

public static CultureInfo ci = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture;
while (!reader.EndOfStream)
{      
      line = reader.ReadLine();
      string[] fields = line.Split(' ');
      DateTime newDT = DateTime.ParseExact(fields[0], "yyyyMMddTHHmmssfff", ci);
}

My profiler highlights ParseExact as being a huge part of time taken. Is there any other method/approach that could parse the string into a DateTime that would be faster?

FOLLOW UP1:

1) I tried this - but speed was same

bool OK = DateTime.TryParseExact(fields[0], "yyyyMMddTHHmmssfff", null, System.Globalization.DateTimeStyles.None,out DT);

2)

I tried to code my own parser - but this too was as slow:

public static DateTime fastParse(ref string s)
{
           return new DateTime(int.Parse(s.Substring(0,4)), int.Parse(s.Substring(4,2)),int.Parse(s.Substring(6,2)), int.Parse(s.Substring(9,2)),int.Parse(s.Substring(11,2)),int.Parse(s.Substring(13,2)),int.Parse(s.Substring(15, 3)));
}

FOLLOW UP2

I tried Master117 suggestion of storing values - AGAIN it is NO faster - perhaps the issue is the construction?

     public class fastParseData
        {
            int year;
            int mon;
            int day;
            int hour;
            int min; 
            string previousSlice = "";

            public DateTime fastParse(ref string s)
            {
                if (previousSlice != s.Substring(0, 12))
                {
                     year=int.Parse(s.Substring(0,4));
                     mon=int.Parse(s.Substring(4,2));
                     day=int.Parse(s.Substring(6,2));
                     hour= int.Parse(s.Substring(9,2));
                     min = int.Parse(s.Substring(11,2));
                     previousSlice = s.Substring(0, 12);
                }

                return new DateTime(year, mon, day, hour,min, int.Parse(s.Substring(13, 2)), int.Parse(s.Substring(15, 3)));
            }

        }

FOLOW UP3

                public class fastParseData
                {
                    int year;
                    int mon;
                    int day;
                    int hour;
                    int min; 
                    string previousSlice = "";
                    DateTime previousDT;

                    public DateTime fastParse(ref string s)
                    {
                        if (previousSlice != s.Substring(0, 12))
                        {
                             year=int.Parse(s.Substring(0,4));
                             mon=int.Parse(s.Substring(4,2));
                             day=int.Parse(s.Substring(6,2));
                             hour= int.Parse(s.Substring(9,2));
                             min = int.Parse(s.Substring(11,2));
                             previousSlice = s.Substring(0, 12);
                            previousDT = new DateTime(year, mon, day, hour,min,0,0);
                        }
                        return previousDT.AddMilliseconds((int.Parse(s.Substring(13, 2))*1000)+int.Parse(s.Substring(15, 3)));
                    }

                }

FOLLOW UP4

From my profiler the crux seems to be

int.Parse(s.Substring(13, 2))

With the Parse bit being more costly than the substring.

I tried

int.TryParse(s.Substring(13, 2),NumberStyles.None,ci, out secs)
Convert.ToInt32(s.Substring(13, 2));

but again - no difference in speed.

Is there a faster way to parse an int?

share|improve this question
    
Are the dates in the fields repeat them self? –  Shani Elharrar Mar 29 '13 at 11:19
    
Is that the entire loop? You parse the string into a DateTime object and then immediately overwrite it with the next one? It might help if you provided a bit more of your code, i.e. what you're actually doing with the parsed DateTime. –  Ant P Mar 29 '13 at 11:20
    
Since it's a fixed format you could try extracting and converting the parts yourself. –  Henk Holterman Mar 29 '13 at 11:20
1  
Have a look at blog.joachim.at/?p=42 –  V4Vendetta Mar 29 '13 at 11:21
1  
It could very well be that most Time is consumed by the DateTime constructor. That would be very hard to optimize. –  Henk Holterman Mar 29 '13 at 11:59

4 Answers 4

You can write your own parsing algorithm, frist you split your string into array/list/whatever and then use the Datetime Constructor to create your Datetime,

DateTime newDT = DateTime(Int32, Int32, Int32, Int32, Int32, Int32, Int32);

since the Year/Month/Day won't change that fast you can BUffer them and have therefore a lower number of String operations.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/vstudio/system.datetime.aspx

an easy way would be too store the first 8 letters, like string a = fields[0].slice(0,8) (don't know the correct operation at the moment), now you parse them and make the ints, but in the next run you slice them again and test if a = new a, if so use the ints from last time instead of parsing them again, naturally for that you need to store a and the integers

So since now the problem seems to be the Construction time you should try to either add the elapsed time, by checking if your ints are higher/lower than before with addSecond etc, or you could take your construct and set the values to your new time.

try this:

            public class fastParseData
            {
                int year;
                int mon;
                int day;
                int hour;
                int min; 
                string previousSlice = "";
                DateTime previousDT;

                public DateTime fastParse(ref string s)
                {
                    if (previousSlice != s.Substring(0, 12))
                    {
                         year=int.Parse(s.Substring(0,4));
                         mon=int.Parse(s.Substring(4,2));
                         day=int.Parse(s.Substring(6,2));
                         hour= int.Parse(s.Substring(9,2));
                         min = int.Parse(s.Substring(11,2));
                         previousSlice = s.Substring(0, 12);
                         previousDT = new DateTime(year, mon, day, hour,min,0,0);
                    }
                    return previousDT.ParseExact(year, mon, day, hour,min, int.Parse(s.Substring(13, 2)), int.Parse(s.Substring(15, 3));
                }

            }

That way you only ones create a DT and then just set the time new

share|improve this answer
    
I created fastParse as you suggest (see follow up above) I don't understand your idea about buffer though? Surely you would need to test if Year is same (another operation) but would still need to do the construction again anyway. Can you explain a bit more please –  ManInMoon Mar 29 '13 at 11:49
    
an easy way would be too store the first 8 letters, like string a = fields[0].slice(0,8) or so, now you parse them and make the ints, but in the next run you slice them and test if a = new a, if so use the ints from last time instead of parsing them again –  Master117 Mar 29 '13 at 11:53
    
+1, nice idea indeed, and I think @ManInMoon, can use a Dictionary<string,int> for holding year, month, and day part, or even construct a dictionary or multiple dictionaries (for year, month, day), and then get the integer value based on the key (string), but this will reduce the time for string to int parsing, not sure if that is the main reason though –  Habib Mar 29 '13 at 12:11
    
@Master117 See FOLLOW UP2. Is this what you mean? Unfortunately, it does NOT speed things up. –  ManInMoon Mar 29 '13 at 12:16
1  
That way you only ones create a DT ... - That's not what really happens. DateTime is an immutable Value type. –  Henk Holterman Mar 29 '13 at 16:48

This might be a good place to use parallelization. Parallel.ForEach could be a good one use, but you may want to test other ways of doing parallelization

private static IEnumerable<string> GetLines(TextReader reader)
{
    while (!reader.EndOfStream)
    {
         yield return reader.ReadLine();
    }
}

private static CultureInfo ci = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture;

public static ConcurrentBag ProcessData(TextReader reader)
{
    ConcurrentBag <DateTime> results = new ConcurrentBag <DateTime>();
    char[] seperators = {' '};

    Parallel.ForEach(GetLines(reader), line =>
    {
        //We only need the first field so limit the split to 2
        string[] fields = line.Split(seperators, 2);
        results.Enqueue(DateTime.ParseExact(fields[0], "yyyyMMddTHHmmssfff", ci));
    });

    return results
}

The drawback of this is you loose order, if that is important to you there is a version Parallel.ForEach that will pass in the index from the IEnumerable. You would need to store the line number with the date (perhaps a ConcurrentDictionary<long,DateTime> or store a Tuple<long,DateTime> in the bag) then sort the data at a later point.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice idea, BUT I am already running the maximum number of instances of my code in parallel. So I would just be slowing down the overall throughput - but you are correct it speed up a single run. –  ManInMoon Mar 29 '13 at 15:18

The idea of splitting the string is on the right track, but substring is slow. Whenever I split a string, I use the character accessor. yyyyMMddTHHmmssfff Disclaimer: T

public class DateParser1
{
    private static System.String DateFormat="yyMMddTHHmmssfff";

    public static System.DateTime GetDate(System.String SourceString, int Offset=0) // Offset eliminates need for substring
    {
        int Year=0;
        int Month=0;
        int Day=0;
        int Hour=0;
        int Minute=0;
        int Second=0;
        int HourOffset=0;
        int MS=0;
        if(SourceString.Length+Offset<DateFormat.Length) throw new System.Exception(System.String.Format("Date Too Short {0} For {0}",SourceString.Substring(Offset),DateFormat));
        for(int i=0;i<DateFormat.Length;i++)
        {
            System.Char c=SourceString[Offset+i];
            switch(DateFormat[i])
            {
                  case 'y':
                      Year=Year*10+(c-'0');
                      break;
                  case 'M':
                      Month=Month*10+(c-'0');
                      break;
                  case 'd':
                      Day=Day*10+(c-'0');
                      break;
                  case 'T':
                      if(c=='p'||c=='P')
                           HourOffset=12;
                      break;
                  case 'h':
                      Hour=Hour*10+(c-'0');
                      if(Hour==12) Hour=0;
                      break;
                  case 'H':

                      Hour=Hour*10+(c-'0');
                      HourOffset=0;
                      break;
                  case 'm':
                      Minute=Minute*10+(c-'0');
                      break;
                  case 's':
                      Second=Second*10+(c-'0');
                      break;
                  case 'f':
                      MS=MS*10+(c-'0');
                      break;
            }

        }
        if(Year>30) //Change For Your Business Rules
        {
               Year+=1900;
        }
        else
        {
               Year+=2000;
        }
        try
        {
            return new System.DateTime(Year,Month,Day,Hour+HourOffset,Minute,Second,MS);
        }
        catch(System.Exception)
        {
            throw new System.Exception(System.String.Format("Error In Date: {0}/{0}/{0} {0}:{0}:{0}.{0} - {0} {0}",Year,Month,Day,Hour+HourOffset,Minute,Second,MS,DateFormat,SourceString.SubString(Offset,DateFormat.Length)));
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Have you profiled this against the system method? –  Dan Puzey Jun 4 '13 at 15:29

Not sure if this would be any faster, but you could convert your date string into a long and then split it up arithmetically like so:

string dateStr = "20131108134701234"; //yyyyMMddHHmmssfff
long dateLong = long.Parse(dateStr);

int f = (int) (dateLong % 1000);
int s = (int) ((dateLong % 100000 - f) / 1000);
int mi = (int) ((dateLong % 10000000 - s - f) / 100000);
int h = (int) ((dateLong % 1000000000 - mi - s - f) / 10000000);
int d = (int) ((dateLong % 100000000000 - h - mi - s - f) / 1000000000);
int mo = (int) ((dateLong % 10000000000000 - d - h - mi - s - f) / 100000000000);
int y = (int) ((dateLong % 100000000000000000 - mo - d - h - mi - s - f) / 10000000000000);

DateTime dateDT = new DateTime(y, mo, d, h, mi, s, f);

(naive, unoptimised implementation)

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